Reference : Evaluating the psychological impact of practice dispatch-assisted cardiopulmonary ins...
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Poster
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/163930
Evaluating the psychological impact of practice dispatch-assisted cardiopulmonary instructions using the ALERT protocol: preliminary results in Liege dispatching centre.
English
[en] Evaluating the psychological impact of practice dispatch-assisted cardiopulmonary instructions using the ALERT protocol: preliminary results in Liege dispatching centre.
Hirtz, Elodie []
Ghuysen, Alexandre mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences de la santé publique > Réanimation - Urgence extrahospitalière >]
STIPULANTE, Samuel mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > HOPISTALISATION - URGENCES >]
EL-FASSI, Mehdi [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Equipe mobile Sart Tilman >]
Etienne, Anne-Marie mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département Psychologies Cliniques et Systèmes Humains > Psychologie de la santé >]
Jul-2013
Yes
No
International
27th Congress of the EHPS : Well-being, quality of life and caregiving
du 16 juillet 2013 au 20 juillet 2013
European Health Psychology Society
Bordeaux
France
[en] Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) ; Untrained persons ; Posttraumatic disorder
[en] ABSTRACT
Background. The ALERT algorithm, an effective compression-only phone cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) protocol has the potential to help bystanders initiate CPR. This study evaluates the psychological impact of the CPR’s practice on untrained persons (UP).
Methods. This is a quasi experimental longitudinal study (n = 153). We used: demographics data, CPR’ emotional characteristics; the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire ; the Way of Coping Check List and the Impact of Event Scale.
Findings. Two psychological profiles: UP at high risk to develop a post traumatic disorder (higher average scores ; high emotional distress during the CPR) versus UP at low risk.
Discussion. These preliminary results highlight the importance of identifying the psychological profile of the UP. For a CPR, UP at high risk should be treated differently: first, take the time to reduce emotional distress and then only talk about the CPR. This step could
reduce the risk for PTSD
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/163930

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