Reference : From wood charcoals to trees: pitfalls and successes of the taxonomic identification ...
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Poster
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
Life sciences : Phytobiology (plant sciences, forestry, mycology...)
Arts & humanities : Archaeology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/162913
From wood charcoals to trees: pitfalls and successes of the taxonomic identification in tropical contexts
English
Morin-Rivat, Julie mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Laboratoire de Foresterie des régions trop. et subtropicales >]
De Weerdt, Joëlle [Musée royal de l'Afrique centrale > > Biologie du Bois > >]
Hubau, Wannes [University of Leeds > Faculty of Environment > School of Geography > >]
Tshibamba, John [University of Kisangani - DRC > > > >]
Doucet, Jean-Louis [Université de Liège - ULiège > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Laboratoire de Foresterie des régions trop. et subtropicales >]
Beeckman, Hans [Musée royal de l'Afrique centrale > > Biologie du Bois > >]
7-Feb-2014
A0
No
No
National
19th National Symposium of Applied Biological Sciences
7 February 2014
Gembloux
Belgique
[en] wood charcoal ; anthracology ; Central Africa ; tropical forest ; paleoecology ; palaeoenvironment ; archaeology ; human impact ; environmental reconstruction
[en] So as to document the past history of tropical forests, several palaeoenvironmental proxies have been used. For instance, charcoals from soil deposits provide a local signal of the evolution of the vegetation together with snapshots of human interactions with the environment. As charcoal analyses are rare in tropical contexts, here we aim at presenting the different aspects of charcoal studies through their pitfalls and successes as well as the needs for further research. Charcoal analysis (anthracology) is a discipline initially from archaeobotany that consists in the analysis of pieces of charred wood primarily found in archaeological contexts but also in natural soil layers. Its goal is to identified the species that burnt during the past through the observation of the charred wood structure. Indeed carbonization, as the incomplete combustion of the ligneous material, preserves the wood structure. The identifications obtained through microscopic observations allow assessing past uses of wood and human impacts on the forest landscape. However, issues typically tropical exist: difficulties related to fieldwork accessibility, to sampling, to soil processing so as to collect the charcoals, difficulties related to the taxonomic identification because of the huge number of species and of the limited number of anatomical descriptions. New developments are nonetheless emerging for Central Africa with original anatomical descriptions, identification protocols and visual keys.
FRIA - Fonds pour la formation à la Recherche dans l'Industrie et dans l'Agriculture ; FRFC - Fonds de la Recherche Fondamentale Collective ; EraNet Biodiversa - CoForChange project
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/162913

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Restricted access
20140207_Poster_NSABS_Gembloux_Morin-Rivat_et_al.pdfAuthor postprint4.33 MBRequest copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.