Reference : Increasing organic cotton production in Benin West Africa with a supplementary food s...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Agriculture & agronomy
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/155628
Increasing organic cotton production in Benin West Africa with a supplementary food spray product to manage pests and beneficial insects
English
Mensah, Robert K. mailto [Australian Cotton Research Institute > > NSW Department Primary Industries > >]
Vodouhê, Davo Simplice mailto [Organisation Béninoise pour la promotion de l'Agriculture Biologique > > > >]
SANFILIPPO, Damien [Pesticide Action Network > > > >]
Assogba, Sonagnon Claude-Gervais mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > > Doct. sc. agro. & ingé. biol.]
2012
International Journal of Pest Management
Taylor & Francis Ltd
58
1
53-64
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0967-0874
1366-5863
[en] Organic cotton is considered a high-value crop in Benin, West Africa, but problems of high costs and reduced yield arising from the lack of effective pest control have left cotton farmers with low profit margins. We have developed a novel supplementary food spray product (Benin Food Product, BFP) to attract and retain beneficial insects on these crops to improve the management of pests. Applications of BFP to organic cotton, with and without other biological control agents, attracted and increased the densities of predatory insects, significantly reducing pest insect numbers and producing higher yields than in cotton treated with neem extract or in cotton that was untreated. In economic
terms, the average gross profit margin on the BFP-treated plot was 125,340 FCFA (French Communaute Financie`re
Africaine; USA $1 ¼ 483 FCFA) with 80,248, 89,450 and 968 FCFA on plots treated with neem extract, synthetic insecticides, and no control agent, respectively. These results clearly show that a supplementary food spray, combined with biological pesticides such as neem extract, sugar, and nuclear polyhedrosis virus, could have a positive economic impact on organic cotton production in Benin.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/155628
10.1080/09670874.2011.645905

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Restricted access
Increasing organic cotton production paper 2012.pdfPublisher postprint2.8 MBRequest copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.