Reference : Emotional Facial Expression Recognition and Expressivity in Type I and Type II Alcoho...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/149013
Emotional Facial Expression Recognition and Expressivity in Type I and Type II Alcohol Dependent Patients
English
Dethier, Marie mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Psychologie clinique cognitive et comportementale >]
El Hawa, Maya []
Duchateau []
Blairy, Sylvie mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Psychologie clinique cognitive et comportementale >]
2014
Journal of Nonverbal Behavior
Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
38
1
89-105
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0191-5886
1573-3653
[en] Alcohol dependence ; emotional facial expression ; interpersonal relationship quality ; nonverbal competence ; typology
[en] Objective: Alcohol dependent patients (ADs) are known to encounter severe interpersonal problems. Nonverbal communication skills are important for the development of healthy relationships. The present study aimed to explore emotional facial expression (EFE) recognition and posed and spontaneous EFE expressivity in male ADs divided into two groups according to Cloninger’s typology and the impact of their interpersonal relationship quality on the potential nonverbal deficits.
Method: Twenty type I ADs, twenty-one type II ADs, and twenty control participants took part in an EFE recognition task and an EFE expressivity task that considered personal emotional events (spontaneous expressivity) and EFE in response to a photo or word cue (posed expressivity). Coding was based on judges’ ratings of participants’ emotional facial expressions. Participants additionally completed a questionnaire on interpersonal relationship quality.
Results: No difference between the three groups emerged in the EFE recognition task. Type II ADs showed heightened deficits compared with type I ADs in EFE expressivity: Judges perceived less accurate posed EFE in response to a cue word and less intense and positive spontaneous EFE in type II ADs compared to control participants. In addition, type II ADs reported more relationship difficulties compared to both type I ADs and control participants. These interpersonal relationship difficulties were related to some of the EFE expressivity deficits of AD-IIs.
Conclusions: This study underlines the important differences between the interpersonal functioning of AD subtypes.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/149013
10.1007/s10919-013-0161-1

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