Reference : Emotional regulation impairments following severe traumatic brain injury: an investig...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/149002
Emotional regulation impairments following severe traumatic brain injury: an investigation of the body and facial feedback effects
English
Dethier, Marie mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Psychologie clinique cognitive et comportementale >]
Blairy, Sylvie mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Psychologie clinique cognitive et comportementale >]
Rosenberg, Hannah []
McDonald, Skye []
2013
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Cambridge University Press
19
4
367-379
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1355-6177
1469-7661
Cambridge
United Kingdom
[en] affective symptoms ; emotion ; posture ; facial expression ; anger ; brain injuries
[en] The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body and facial feedback in adults who had suffered from a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in order to gain some understanding of their difficulties in the regulation of negative emotions. Twenty-four participants with TBI and 28 control participants adopted facial expressions and body postures according to specific instructions and maintained these positions for 10 seconds. Expressions and postures entailed anger, sadness, and happiness as well as a neutral (baseline) condition. After each expression/posture manipulation, participants evaluated their subjective emotional state (including cheerfulness, sadness, and irritation). TBI participants were globally less responsive to the effects of body and facial feedback than control participants, F (1, 50) = 5.89, p = .02, η2 = .11. More interestingly, the TBI group differed from the Control group across emotions, F (8,400) = 2.51, p = .01, η2 = .05. Specifically, participants with TBI were responsive to happy but not to negative expression/posture manipulations whereas control participants were responsive to happy, angry, and sad expression/posture manipulations. In conclusion, TBI appears to impair the ability to recognise both the physical configuration of a negative emotion and its associated subjective feeling.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/149002
10.1017/S1355617712001555

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