Reference : THE RESPONSE OF ACETOBACTER SENEGALENSIS TO STRESSORS: A STUDY TOWARDS IMPROVEMENT OF...
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Paper published in a journal
Life sciences : Biotechnology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/146062
THE RESPONSE OF ACETOBACTER SENEGALENSIS TO STRESSORS: A STUDY TOWARDS IMPROVEMENT OF VINEGAR STARTER PRODUCTION
English
Shafiei, Rasoul mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > > >]
Thonart, Philippe mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences de la vie > Biochimie et microbiologie industrielles >]
Apr-2012
Acetic Acid Bacteria
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
2240-2845
Acetic acid bacteria conferance
17-04-2012 to 20-04-2012
[en] starter ; 2-DiGE ; membrane integrity ; viability ; Acetobacter senegalensis
[en] Acetic acid bacteria encounter various harsh conditions during acetic acid fermentation. Ethanol as the main
substrate and acetic acid as the major product at low pH can influence deeply on the cellular functions of acetic
acid bacteria. In previous studies in CWBI, Acetobacter senegalensis was used for production of dried vinegar
starters; however the impact of stressors (ethanol and acetic acid) on A. senegalensis remained unclear. In this
study, different techniques such as flow cytometry, culturability on solid medium and 2-DiGE were used comparatively to investigate the effect of carbon sources of inoculum media on the tolerance of A. senegalensis to
stressors.
Analysis of respiration system by flow cytometric methods showed that the presence of 2% (v/v) acetic acid
in inoculum medium, in one hand, causes 80% of cells to continue to do respiration after a sudden exposure to 1-
3% (v/v) acetic acid in stress media while 89.7% of cells grown in glucose appeared as dead cells after an abrupt
exposure to 3%(v/v) of acetic acid. On the other hand, 59.2% and 49.33% of cells grown in the presence of 2%
(v/v) of acetic acid could maintain their entire membrane integrity after exposure to 1% and 3% (v/v) of acetic acid, respectively.
Inoculum medium contained 5% (v/v) of ethanol as a carbon source enabled about 90% of cells to keep their
growing capacities after a sudden exposure to 3% acetic acid. In contrast, just 40% of cells grown in glucose as a
carbon source maintained their culturability on solid medium after exposure to 1% acetic acid. A similar profile
of culturability was observed for the cells grown in 5% (v/v) ethanol or 2% (v/v) of acetic acid.
A proteomic approach (2-DiGE) was used to analyze proteins expressed in the presence of different carbon sources. Differentially expressed proteins were mainly associated with energy metabolism, carbohydrate metabolisms, folding, sorting and degradation processes. The relative abundance of proteins was extensively different for cell grown in glucose compared with protein contents of
cells grown in ethanol or acetic acid.
In conclusion, production of a cost effective vinegar starter needs a qualified biomass which tolerates ethanol and
acetic acid. Tolerance of A. senegalensis to acetic acid depends to a great extent on the composition of the
medium which cells grow in. In spite of low adaption to acetic acid for cell grown in glucose, using ethanol or
acetic acid in inoculum media renders a physiological state in A. senegelensis which enables it to cope with higher concentration of acetic acid readily, this biomass
has a potential to be used as a starter
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/146062

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