Reference : Elevated atmospheric CO2 influences ammonia oxidiser community structure and net nitr...
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Unpublished conference/Abstract
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
Life sciences : Phytobiology (plant sciences, forestry, mycology...)
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/94531
Elevated atmospheric CO2 influences ammonia oxidiser community structure and net nitrification
English
Carnol, Monique mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences et gestion de l'environnement > Ecologie végétale et microbienne >]
Malchair, Sandrine mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences et gestion de l'environnement > Ecologie végétale et microbienne >]
Sep-2003
No
No
International
Structure and Function of Soil Microbiota
du 18 septembre 2003 au 20 septembre 2003
Marburg
Allemagne
[en] climate change ; opent top chambers ; nitrification ; ammonia oxidizing bacteria ; PCR-DGGE ; Nitrosomonas
[en] The control of soil nitrogen (N) availability under elevated atmospheric CO2 is central to predicting changes in ecosystem carbon storage and primary productivity. The effects of elevated CO2 on belowground processes have so far attracted limited research and they are assumed to be controlled by indirect effects through changes in plant physiology and chemistry. In this study, we investigated the effects of a 4-year exposure to elevated CO2 (ambient + 400 μmol mol-1) in open top chambers under Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) on net nitrification and the community of ammonia-oxidising bacteria.
Net nitrate production was significantly increased for soil from the elevated CO2 treatment in the field when incubated in the laboratory under elevated CO2, but there was no effect when incubated under ambient CO2. Net nitrate production of the soil originating from the ambient CO2 treatment in the field was not influenced by laboratory incubation conditions. These results indicate that a direct effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on soil microbial processes might take place. Molecular analysis of the ammonia-oxidising bacteria from the same soils before laboratory incubation was investigated using a PCR-based approach targeting the 16S rRNA gene of beta-subgroup ammonia oxidisers. After specific PCR, DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) and sequence analysis were used to determine ammonia-oxidiser community structure. First results indicate the disappearance of Nitrosospira clusters I, II and III under elevated CO2 but also call for systematic analysis of replicates to take into account methodological and sample variability.
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/94531

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