Reference : Transition to parenthood of lesbian parents: key processes and clinical implications
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Unpublished conference/Abstract
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/201891
Transition to parenthood of lesbian parents: key processes and clinical implications
English
Scali, Thérèse mailto [Université de Liège > Département de Psychologie > Clinique systémique et psychopathologie relationnelle >]
D'Amore, Salvatore mailto [Université de Liège > Département de Psychologie > Clinique systémique et psychopathologie relationnelle >]
Haxhe, Stéphanie mailto [Université de Liège > > DG : Serv. d'accomp. des étudiants en situation de handicap >]
Duret, Isabelle [Université Libre de Bruxelles - ULB > > > >]
29-Sep-2016
Yes
Yes
International
9th EFTA Congress (European Family Therapy Association)
28 septembre au 1 octobre 2016
European Family Therapy Association
Athens
Greece
[en] parenthood ; same-sex headed families ; artificial insemination
[en] The transition to parenthood is a key process for understanding the development of family relationships in a systemic perspective. This process has been studied mostly in heterosexual families but very few studies focus on families with same-sex families. This exploratory study analyzes the key passages of the transition from 17 lesbian headed families through a quantitative analysis of socio-demographic data, information about the coming-out, pair formation, project of the child, the child's arrival, as well as social and cultural pressures towards family and stressors. The main results show that the decision making to become parents is generally harmonious (70%) between the members of the couple, and only a few had substantial conflicts (17,1%). Moreover, the motivation to become parents seems to be stronger for the mother who carried the child (57, 1%)than for the social mother. The majority of the lesbian mothers reported no medical homophobia (64,3%) Regarding the caregiving tasks, they seem to be equally shared between social and biological mothers. In regards to the child, almost 70% are aware of their parents’ sexual orientation (as only 5.7% are not fully aware). Finally, no changes in the quality of relationship with the family of origin have been found after the birth of the baby. Clinical implications of these results will be discussed.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/201891

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