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See detailÉrotien, l'érudition hellénistique et la terminologie de la librairie
Marganne, Marie-Hélène ULiege

in Huys, Marc; Swiggers, Pierre (Eds.) Grammar and Language in Ancient Books : Papers Presented to Alfons Wouters on the Occasion of his Retirement (in press)

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See detailPhenotyping of Brassica napus L. plantlets affected during in vitro growth by the presence of epoxiconazole
Durenne, Bastien ULiege; Blondel, Alodie; Ducat, Nathalie et al

in Acta Horticulturae (in press)

Epoxiconazole like others triazole fungicides are known to be persistent in the soil. Several studies using foliar application experiments demonstrated the effect of its triazole metabolite as plant ... [more ▼]

Epoxiconazole like others triazole fungicides are known to be persistent in the soil. Several studies using foliar application experiments demonstrated the effect of its triazole metabolite as plant growth regulator through the anti-gibberellin activity. And notably, the reduction of Brassica napus L. growth can be attributed to the inhibition of gibberellin biosynthesis at the stage of conversion of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid. We describe here an in vitro experiment studying the relationship between epoxiconazole in culture medium (0 mg L⁻¹, 0.120 mg L⁻¹ and 0.200 mg L⁻¹) and the phenotyping (root and shoot growth) of three varieties of winter rapeseeds (Brassica napus L. var. Catalina, var. ES Astrid and var. Toccata). Plantlets fungicide content was quantified using the QuEChERS extraction method following by an automated UHPLC-MS/MS analysis. Results showed that the shoots and roots growth of Brassica napus L. plantlets was significantly inhibited by epoxiconazole at 0.120 mg L⁻¹ independently of the variety. The concentration of 0.200 mg L⁻¹ leaded to necrosis and anthocyanosis symptoms and can be considered as lethal for in vitro growing explants. The huge epoxiconazole absorption by rapeseed plantlets clearly showed a dose-dependent relationship and was closely similar for the three varieties. [less ▲]

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See detailRéduire l’altérité au travers des processus de traduction et de représentation
Leclercq, Bruno ULiege; Smette, Bernard ULiege

in Doctorales. Revue LLA-SHS de Montpellier (in press)

WVO Quine questions the « myth » of an ideal realm of shared meanings which every national language would express in its own way. Against the hope of transparent translations, he insists on the necessity ... [more ▼]

WVO Quine questions the « myth » of an ideal realm of shared meanings which every national language would express in its own way. Against the hope of transparent translations, he insists on the necessity for building equivalences from one language to another through a strategy of reducing the differences in rationality among nations as much as possible. According to Quine, otherness is not insuperable impediment to meeting/encounter and mutual understanding ; by throwing our conceptual schemes on the other communities’ uses/practices – which of course involves some symbolic violence – gaps can always been narrowed. Similarly E. Laclau questions the traditional conception of political representation, which is seen as the transparent process of transmitting someone’s will or interests on another level. For this ideal conception of representation, Laclau substitutes a pragmatic conception which takes in account the irreducible gap between the actors as well as the constitutive opacity of the process of representation : the subject’s will is constituted within the process of representation and through the representative’s productive role. In order to be transposed at the decision-making level, the subject’s interests must be translated by the representative as well as be negotiated with the other represented interests. This implies that the initial will undergoes some identity transformations. [less ▲]

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See detailIPCAPS: an R package for iterative pruning to capture population structure
Chaichoompu, Kridsadakorn ULiege; Abegaz Yazew, Fentaw; Tongsima, Sissades et al

in Bioinformatics : Application Notes (in press)

Resolving population genetic structure is challenging, especially when dealing with closely related populations. Although Principal Component Analysis (PCA)-based methods and genomic var- iation with ... [more ▼]

Resolving population genetic structure is challenging, especially when dealing with closely related populations. Although Principal Component Analysis (PCA)-based methods and genomic var- iation with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widely used to describe shared genetic an- cestry, improvements can be made targeting fine-level population structure. This work presents an R package called IPCAPS, which uses SNP information for resolving possibly fine-level population structure. The IPCAPS routines are built on the iterative pruning Principal Component Analysis (ipP- CA) framework to systematically assign individuals to genetically similar subgroups. Our tool is able to detect and eliminate outliers in each iteration to avoid misclassification. It can be extended to de- tect subtle subgrouping in patients as well. In addition, IPCAPS supports different measurement scales for variables used to identify substructure. Hence, panels of gene expression and methylation data can be accommodated. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbohydrates in Paediatric Parenteral Nutrition
Mesotten, D; Joosten, K; van Kempen, A et al

in Clinical Nutrition (in press)

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See detailHome Parenteral Nutrition in Paediatrics
Hill, S; Ksiaszyk, J; Prell, C et al

in Clinical Nutrition (in press)

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See detailOrganisational aspects of paediatric parenteral nutrition
Puntis, J; Hojsak, I; Ksiazyk, J et al

in Clinical Nutrition (in press)

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See detailEnergy in Paediatric Parenteral Nutrition
Joosten, Koen; Embleton, Nick; Yan, W et al

in Clinical Nutrition (in press)

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See detailVitamins in Paediatric Parenteral Nutrition
Bronski, J; Campoy, C; Braegger, C et al

in Clinical Nutrition (in press)

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See detailVenous Access for Paediatric Parenteral Nutrition
Kolacek, S; Puntis, J; Hojsak, I et al

in Clinical Nutrition (in press)

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See detailIron and Trace Element in Paediatric Parenteral Nutrition
Domellof, M; Szitanyi, P; Simchowitz, V et al

in Clinical Nutrition (in press)

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See detailFluid and Electrolytes (Na, Cl and K) in Paediatric Parenteral Nutrition
Jochum, Franck; Moltu, Sissel; SENTERRE, Thibault ULiege et al

in Clinical Nutrition (in press)

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See detailStandard versus individualized parenteral nutrition
Riskin, A; Picaud, J-C; Shamir, R et al

in Clinical Nutrition (in press)

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See detailUn parcours dans la psychologie clinique et la psychiatrie à l’Université de Liège : singularités et originalités
Mormont, Christian ULiege; Englebert, Jérôme ULiege

in Genin, Vincent (Ed.) Deux siècles au service des sciences humaines : Contribution(s) de l’Université de Liège 1817-2017 (in press)

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See detailLes corps saints des catacombes de Rome aux Pays-Bas : acteurs, réseaux, flux
Delfosse, Annick ULiege

in Duhamelle, Christophe; Bacciochi, Stéphane (Eds.) Les corps saints des catacombes dans l’espace de la catholicité à l’âge moderne (XVIIe-XIXe siècles) (in press)

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See detailPer una edizione integrale e analitica dell'incipit della Storia d'Italia di Francesco Guicciardini
Moreno, Paola ULiege

in Laboratoire Italien : Politique et Société (in press)

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See detailPilgrimage Certificates from the Mamluk Period: New Data
Bauden, Frédéric ULiege

in Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies (in press)

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See detailMilk-clotting properties of plant rennets and their enzymatic, rheological and sensory role in cheese making: a Review
Ben Amira, Amal; Besbes, Souhail; Attia, Hamadi et al

in International Journal of Food Properties (in press)

Plant rennets hold an important position amongst various coagulants used in cheese technology. The selection of a suitable plant coagulant is important due to the increasing global demands of cheese ... [more ▼]

Plant rennets hold an important position amongst various coagulants used in cheese technology. The selection of a suitable plant coagulant is important due to the increasing global demands of cheese alongside reduced supply of calf rennet. Thus, a literature synthesis is presented to investigate recent achievements on their functional properties and enzymatic role in cheese making. Efforts have also been done to compare certain rheological and sensory properties of final products, arising from some plant and animal based rennets. In fact, some coagulants such as actinidin or dubiumin produce cheeses with sensory qualities similar to those produced by animal rennet. Others, like ginger, cucumisin or hieronymain proteases contribute to develop very different textures and flavors, due to excessive proteolytic activity and production of bitter peptides. For milk-clotting enzymes with high non-specific action, several improvement strategies have been developed to produce cheeses with sensory properties close to those of animal rennet. For example, the mixture of coagulants (cardosins/chymosin), the selection of appropriate milk or its ultrafiltration, as well as the increase of salting time of cheese during ripening could be efficient ways to improve texture and reduce bitterness. Concerning cheeses with high yield loss, the whey could be used for a traditional production of whey cheese. To conclude, the selection of appropriate plant rennet with high MCA/PA ratio and the optimization of all coagulation parameters play a central role in manufacturing cheese with superior rheological and sensory properties. [less ▲]

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See detailCyanobacteria inhabiting biological soil crusts of a polar desert: Sør Rondane Mountains, Antarctica
Pushkareva, Ekaterina; Pessi, Igor S; Namsaraev, Zorigto et al

in Systematic and Applied Microbiology (in press)

Molecular and morphological methods were applied to study cyanobacterial community composition in biological soil crusts (BSCs) from four areas (two nunataks and two ridges) in the Sør Rondane Mountains ... [more ▼]

Molecular and morphological methods were applied to study cyanobacterial community composition in biological soil crusts (BSCs) from four areas (two nunataks and two ridges) in the Sør Rondane Mountains, Antarctica. The sampling sites serve as control areas for open top chambers (OTCs) which were placed in 2010 at the time of sample collection and will be compared with BSC samples taken from the OTCs in future. Cyanobacterial cell biovolume was estimated using epifluorescence microscopy, which revealed the dominance of filamentous cyanobacteria in all studied sites except the Utsteinen ridge, where unicellular cyanobacteria were the most abundant. Cyanobacterial diversity was studied by a combination of molecular fingerprinting methods based on the 16S rRNA gene (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 454 pyrosequencing) using cyanobacteria specific primers. The number of DGGE sequences obtained per site was variable and, therefore, a high-throughput method was later employed to improve the diversity coverage. Consistent with previous surveys in Antarctica, both methods showed that filamentous cyanobacteria such as Leptolyngbya sp., Phormidium sp. and Microcoleus sp. were dominant in the studied sites. In addition, the studied localities differed in substrate type, climatic conditions and soil parameters, which likely resulted in differences in cyanobacterial community composition. Furthermore, the BSC growing on gneiss pebbles had lower cyanobacterial abundances than BSCs associated to granitic substrates. [less ▲]

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