Publications of Marc Vandenheede
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See detailIndividual differences in behavior affect total tract fiber digestibility: the exemple of collared peccary
Borges, R.M.; Nogueira-Filho, S.L.G.; Cairo, P.L.G. et al

in Animal (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (7 ULiège)
See detailHorse housing: active stable and tracks systems - management and practices in Belgium and France
Humbel, Maïlis ULiege; Vandenheede, Marc ULiege; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULiege

in book of abstracts of 70th EAAP Annual Meeting (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (5 ULiège)
See detailLa viande, questions de vies et de morts ?
Clinquart, Antoine ULiege; Vandenheede, Marc ULiege; Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

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See detailLe logement du cheval: implications en termes de bien-être et d’éthique
Mikaeloff, Camille ULiege; Vandenheede, Marc ULiege; Vandenput, Sandrina ULiege

in 42ème Journée de la Recherche Équine "Bien-être des équidés" (2016)

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See detailAxillary temperature measurement: a less stressful alternative for hospitalised cats?
Girod, Maud ULiege; Vandenheede, Marc ULiege; Farnir, Frédéric ULiege et al

in Veterinary Record: Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2016), 178(8), 192

Rectal temperature measurement (RTM) can promote stress and defensive behaviour in hospitalised cats. The aim of this study was to assess if axillary temperature measurement (ATM) could be a reliable and ... [more ▼]

Rectal temperature measurement (RTM) can promote stress and defensive behaviour in hospitalised cats. The aim of this study was to assess if axillary temperature measurement (ATM) could be a reliable and less stressful alternative for these animals. In this prospective study, paired rectal and axillary temperatures were measured in 42 cats, either by a veterinarian or a student. To assess the impact of these procedures on the cat's stress state, their heart rate was checked and a cat stress score (CSS) was defined and graded from 1 (relaxed) to 5 (terrified). A moderate correlation was found between RTM and ATM (r=0.52; P<0.0001). RTM was on average 0.9°C (1.6°F) higher than ATM (P<0.0001), although a wide variation was found in the difference between these two measurements (−2.1°C to 3.6°C (−3.8°F to 6.5°F)). ATM failed to identify hypothermia in 25 per cent of the cases and hyperthermia in 19 per cent of the cases but may be considered less stressful than RTM. Indeed, RTM induced a mildly greater increase in heart rate (+6 bpm; P=0.01) and in CSS (+0.2; P=0.001) than ATM. The results were not affected by operator type. In conclusion, RTM should remain the standard method to obtain accurate temperatures in cats. [less ▲]

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See detailAnimal health and welfare: equivalent or complementary?
Nicks, Baudouin ULiege; Vandenheede, Marc ULiege

in Revue Scientifique et Technique. Office International des Epizooties (2014), 33(1), 91-96

Reflexion about the concepts of "health" and "welfare", applied to domestic animals in comparison with humans.

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See detailRider and horse salivary cortisol levels during competition and impact on performance.
Peeters, Marie ULiege; Closson, Coline; Beckers, Jean-François ULiege et al

in Journal of Equine Veterinary Science (2013), 33(3), 155-160

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See detailRelationships between young stallions's temperament and their behavioral reactions during standardized veterinary examinations.
Peeters, Marie ULiege; Verwilghen, Denis ULiege; Serteyn, Didier ULiege et al

in Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research (2012), 7(5), 311-321

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See detailIMPACT OF THE TEMPERAMENT OF YOUNG STALLIONS ON THEIR STRESS REACTIONS WHEN SUBJECTED TO A STANDARDISED VETERINARY EXAMINATION
Peeters, Marie ULiege; Verwilghen, Denis ULiege; Serteyn, Didier ULiege et al

in Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research (2011, September), 6

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See detailLe stress du cavalier et du cheval en compétition
Peeters, Marie ULiege; Closson, Coline ULiege; Beckers, Jean-François ULiege et al

Poster (2011, February 24)

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See detailLa relation entre peur et bien-être chez les animaux de production
Vandenheede, Marc ULiege

in Beata, Claude (Ed.) La peur. De l'animal à l'humain, de l'éthologie à la pathologie. (2011)

Fear is a basic emotion shared by humans and most animals that meet veterinarians. This book gathers the proceedings of the "Zoopsy 2011" congress, where veterinarians and other health professionals ... [more ▼]

Fear is a basic emotion shared by humans and most animals that meet veterinarians. This book gathers the proceedings of the "Zoopsy 2011" congress, where veterinarians and other health professionals talked about fear. The article speaks about the relationships between fear and welfare in farmed animals. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison between blood serum and salivary cortisol concentrations in horses using an adrenocorticotropic hormone challenge
Peeters, Marie ULiege; Sulon, Joseph; Beckers, Jean-François ULiege et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2011), 43(4), 487-493

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See detailCan we predict troubles during horse clinical examination by a simple test?
Peeters, Marie ULiege; Godfroid, Sandra; Sulon, Joseph et al

Poster (2010, August 03)

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See detailAssessment of stress level in horses during competition using salivary cortisol: preliminary studies
Peeters, Marie ULiege; Sulon, Joseph; Serteyn, Didier ULiege et al

in Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research (2010, July), 5(4), 216

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See detailGaseous emissions from weaned pigs raised on different floor systems
Cabaraux, Jean-François ULiege; Philippe, François-Xavier ULiege; Laitat, Martine ULiege et al

in Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment (2009), 130

Gaseous emissions from agriculture contribute to a number of environmental effects. Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are greenhouse gases taking part to the global problem of ... [more ▼]

Gaseous emissions from agriculture contribute to a number of environmental effects. Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are greenhouse gases taking part to the global problem of climate change. Ammonia (NH3) emissions are responsible of soil acidification and eutrophication and contribute also to indirect emissions of N2O. This work evaluated the influence of the type of floor on the emissions of these gases in the raising of weaned pigs. Two trials were carried out. In the first trial, the animals were kept either on fully slatted floor or on straw-based deep litter and, in the second one, either on fully slatted floor or on sawdust-based deep litter. For each trial and on each type of floor, 2 successive batches of weaned pigs were raised without changing the litter or emptying the slurry pit between the 2 batches. The rooms were automatically ventilated to maintain a constant ambient temperature. The performance of the animals was not significantly different according to the floor type. In trial 1, the nitrogen contents of the straw deep litter (including the substrate) and slurry were respectively 276 and 389 g pig-1. In trial 2, the sawdust deep litter and slurry nitrogen contents were respectively 122 and 318 g pig-1. Raising pigs on straw deep litter produced proportionately around 100% more NH3 than raising pigs on slatted floor (0.61 vs. 0.31 g NH3-N d-1 per pig; P<0.05). Differences in CO2, H2O and CH4 emissions were not significant between systems. Raising pigs on sawdust deep litter produced also proportionately more NH3 (+52%; 0.55 vs. 0.36 g NH3-N d-1 per pig; P<0.01) but also more CO2 (+25%; 427 vs. 341 g d-1 per pig; P<0.001) and H2O (+65%; 981 vs. 593 g d-1 per pig; P<0.001) and less CH4 (-40%; 0.52 vs. 0.86 g d-1 per pig; P<0.001) than raising pigs on slatted floor. Practically no N2O emission was observed from rooms with slatted floor while the N2O emissions were 0.03 and 0.32 g N2O-N d-1 per pig for the straw and sawdust deep litter respectively. The warming potential of the greenhouse gases (N2O + CH4), were about 22, 34 and 168 g CO2 equivalents per day and per pig on fully slatted floor, straw or sawdust deep litter respectively. In conclusion, pollutant gas emissions from rearing of weaned pig seem lower with fully slatted plastic floor system than with deep litter systems [less ▲]

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See detailAnalyse des modalités d'utilisation d'un distributeur automatique de concentré (DAC)
Wavreille, José; Remience, Virginie; Canart, Bernard et al

in Compte-rendu des 41ème Journées de la Recherche Porcine en France (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (3 ULiège)