Publications of Caroline Zickgraf
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See detailFuture Flows : Forecasting and Responding to Environmental Migration
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2018)

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See detailClimate change induced-migration
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference (2018, October 16)

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See detailMigration, Changement Climatique et l’Environnement en Afrique de l’Ouest
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (1 ULiège)
See detailClimate change and Migration
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (1 ULiège)
See detailInternal to Cross-border Displacement in Multi-Risk and Slow-Onset Contexts
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference (2018, July 20)

Internal to Cross-border Displacement in Multi-Risk and Slow-Onset Contexts – Dr Caroline Zickgraf (The Hugo Observatory, University of Liège, Belgium) Displacement presents a complex issue that is far ... [more ▼]

Internal to Cross-border Displacement in Multi-Risk and Slow-Onset Contexts – Dr Caroline Zickgraf (The Hugo Observatory, University of Liège, Belgium) Displacement presents a complex issue that is far too often overly simplified, both in terms of knowledge about its drivers and outcomes and in terms of responding political solutions. Drivers are often articulated in the singular and, specifically, as conflict forces people to flee their homes. Whereas previous research and grey literature tends to isolate risks (conflict, armed violence, natural disasters) and subsequent displacement outcomes (internal or cross-border displacement), research findings highlight the important linkages among drivers, trajectories, and outcomes. A single force rarely alone causes displacement and trajectories do not respect traditional distinctions between internal and cross-border displacement, particularly in porous borderlands such as West Africa’s ECOWAS region. Therefore, this presentation asserts that displacement scenarios should be considered as risks combine to force people to flee their homes internally and across national borders while challenging singular or binary characterizations of human mobility. Taking the particular lens of environment and climate change-related displacement, which currently account for more new internal displacement than conflict (IDMC 2018), we present two key aspects to consider: a) displacement in slow-onset environmental change contexts and b) the importance of multi-risk scenarios in driving displacement. The former presents a particular challenge as the influence of environment (sea-level rise, desertification, drought, etc.) becomes difficult to disentangle from other social, economic, demographic and political influences. Resulting from this conceptual marsh, people are often labeled as ‘economic’ or ‘labour’ migrants as they move away from their homes seeking better opportunities. The environmental aspects underpinning these movements become obscured along with their protection needs. The latter, multi-risk scenarios, need also be highlighted because of the geographical concurrence of risks. While commonly sudden-onset disasters are linked to displacement, such hazards frequently occur in the same areas as slow-onset disasters. Flooding plagues many coastal populations that are concomitantly menaced by sea-level rise and coastal erosion. Thus, separating these drivers and their attached displacement reveals only a portion of the bigger picture of how people’s migratory decisions and mobility outcomes take shape. Finally, this presentation pushes for complexity to be recognized not only in terms of displacement drivers, but also in the ways that the scientific community and policymakers approach the characterization of displacement journeys and outcomes. We argue against teleological narratives that assume a linear process of movement and present evidence regarding the dynamic geopolitical movement of displaced persons. [less ▲]

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See detailGender and Migration
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, July 13)

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See detailClimate Change and Migration
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, July 12)

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See detailClimate Change/Environmental Refugees : Towards a Possible Definition
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (1 ULiège)
See detailL’immobilité et l’environnement
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference (2018, February 09)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (1 ULiège)
See detailImmobility
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

in Gemenne, François; McLeman, Robert (Eds.) Routledge Handbook on Environmental Displacement and Migration (2018)

This chapter provides a review of what we know about immobility in environmental migration studies.

Detailed reference viewed: 289 (21 ULiège)
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See detailThe Fish Migrate and so Must We’: the Relationship between International and Internal Environmental Mobility in a Senegalese Fishing Community
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

in Journal of International Relations (2018), 16

In 2008, the UN designated Saint-Louis “the city most threatened by rising sea levels in the whole of Africa”. The people of Guet Ndar, a densely populated fishing quarter, are coping with environmental ... [more ▼]

In 2008, the UN designated Saint-Louis “the city most threatened by rising sea levels in the whole of Africa”. The people of Guet Ndar, a densely populated fishing quarter, are coping with environmental challenges on two fronts: 1) coastal erosion and intensifying storms have destroyed sea-front homes, and, 2) overfishing and climate change’s maritime impacts are making local fishing less feasible as a livelihood strategy. Based on a local fieldwork, this paper examines Guet Ndarian migration as an adaptive response to environmental risks and more specifically climate change: 1) through the intensification of fishing migration to Mauritania, and 2) through home construction on the mainland away from the encroaching sea. Although these population movements respond to different environmental challenges, this paper identifies their enmeshment as the former facilitates the latter. Furthermore, it embeds these migratory dynamics in their socio-economic context and applies mobility and transnational paradigms to environmentally vulnerable areas. [less ▲]

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See detailThe State of Environmental Migration 2018: A review of 2017
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege; Hut, Elodie ULiege; Gemenne, François ULiege

Book published by Presses universitaires de Liège (2018)

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See detailPeople moved and will move again
Gemenne, François ULiege; De Longueville, Florence ULiege; De Bruyckere, Luka ULiege et al

Conference (2017, December 11)

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See detailPeople moved and will move again
Gemenne, François ULiege; De Longueville, Florence ULiege; De Bruyckere, Luka ULiege et al

Conference (2017, November 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (1 ULiège)
See detailClimate Change, Health and (Im)mobility: Regional Evidence of El Niño
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (1 ULiège)
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See detailMigration under Extreme Climate Change
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2017)

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See detailGlobal assessment of impacts on migration and security issues
Richardson, Katy; Bradshaw, Catherine; Lewis, Kirsty et al

Report (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (6 ULiège)
See detailThe State of Environmental Migration 2017: A Review of 2016
Gemenne, François ULiege; Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege; Debruyckere, Luka

Book published by Presses universitaires de Liège (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 ULiège)