Publications of Aurelia Hubert
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See detailActive faulting at the western tip of the Gulf of Corinth, Greece, from high-resolution seismic data
Beckers, Arnaud ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Beck, Christian et al

in Marine Geology (2015)

The Gulf of Corinth is one of the fastest-spreading intra-continental rifts on Earth. GPS data indicate that the rift is currently opening in a NNE-SSW direction, with a rate of extension reaching up to ... [more ▼]

The Gulf of Corinth is one of the fastest-spreading intra-continental rifts on Earth. GPS data indicate that the rift is currently opening in a NNE-SSW direction, with a rate of extension reaching up to 16 mm yr-1 in its westernmost part. Although the rest of the offshore rift has been well studied, the western tip of the rift is still poorly explored. We present an accurate map of submarine faults in this area based on two high-resolution seismic reflection surveys (single channel sparker). In the eastern part of the studied area, the sedimentary infill is affected by the known North Eratini, South Eratini and West Channel faults. Further to the west, the seafloor is mostly flat, and is bounded to the north by the normal, south-dipping, Trizonia fault. To the north, the shallower part of the Gulf shows to the east a diffuse pattern of normal and strike-slip deformation which is replaced to the west by a 7.5 km long SE striking strike-slip fault zone, called the Managouli fault zone. To the westernmost tip of the Gulf, in the Nafpaktos Basin, two fault sets with different strikes are encountered; the one with aNE-SW strike exhibits a clear strike-slip component. The western tip of the Gulf of Corinth is the only part of the Corinth Rift where convincing evidence for strike-slip movement has been found. This fault pattern is likely related to the complex deformation occurring at the diffuse junction at the western tip of the Rift between three crustal blocks: Continental Greece, Peloponnese, and the Ionian Island-Akarnia block. [less ▲]

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See detailExamples of Subaqueous Paleoseismological Techniques from Turkey and Iceland: With Special Emphasis on the Importance of Constructing Precise Sediment Chronologies
Avsar, Ulas; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Jonsson, S. et al

in American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2014, abstract (2014, December)

Subaqueous paleoseismological techniques have proved their potential to contribute to the paleoseismological investigations. Sedimentary records of past earthquakes have been mostly represented in ... [more ▼]

Subaqueous paleoseismological techniques have proved their potential to contribute to the paleoseismological investigations. Sedimentary records of past earthquakes have been mostly represented in lacustrine environments by multi-location coeval mass-wasting deposits and/or soft-sediment deformations. More recently, records of increased sediment influx due to seismically-triggered landslides in lake catchments have been explored by several researchers as well. The most commonly used argument in subaqueous paleoseismology is the temporal correlation between observed sedimentary events and historical earthquakes in the region. This requires precise and robust sediment chronologies, especially if the target is to evaluate earthquake recurrence. Here, we present lacustrine paleoseismological examples from the North Anatolian Fault (NAF, Turkey) and the Húsavík-Flatey Fault (HFF, Iceland). The examples from Turkey illustrate the application of regional time-stratigraphic correlations between proxy records to improve sediment chronologies. The sedimentary records of the lakes along the NAF were successfully correlated with the precisely dated cave deposits and varved lake sediments, which significantly improved the sediment chronologies. On the other hand, the investigations in Iceland benefit from the well-established tephrochronology in the region. Precise sediment chronologies do not only allow us to evaluate the long-term seismic behavior in a region (i.e., earthquake recurrence), but also to improve our understanding of the consequences of earthquakes on lacustrine sedimentation. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Corinth Rift Laboratory, Greece (CRL): A Multidisciplinary Near Fault Observatory (NFO) on a Fast Rifting System
Bernard, P; Lyon-Caen, H.; Deschamp, A. et al

in AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts (2014, December)

The western rift of Corinth (Greece) is one of the most active tectonic structures of the euro-mediterranean area. Its NS opening rate is 1.5 cm/yr ( strain rate of 10-6/yr) results into a high ... [more ▼]

The western rift of Corinth (Greece) is one of the most active tectonic structures of the euro-mediterranean area. Its NS opening rate is 1.5 cm/yr ( strain rate of 10-6/yr) results into a high microseismicity level and a few destructive, M>6 earthquakes per century, activating a system of mostly north dipping normal faults. Since 2001, monitoring arrays of the European Corinth Rift Laboratory (CRL, www.crlab.eu) allowed to better track the mechanical processes at work, with short period and broad band seismometers, cGPS, borehole strainmeters, EM stations, …). The recent (300 kyr) tectonic history has been revealed by onland (uplifted fan deltas and terraces) and offshore geological studies (mapping, shallow seismic, coring), showing a fast evolution of the normal fault system. The microseismicity, dominated by swarms lasting from days to months, mostly clusters in a layer 1 to 3 km thick, between 6 and 9 km in depth, dipping towards north, on which most faults are rooting. The diffusion of the microseismicity suggests its triggering by pore pressure transients, with no or barely detected strain. Despite a large proportion of multiplets, true repeaters seem seldom, suggesting a minor contribution of creep in their triggering, although transient or steady creep is clearly detected on the shallow part of some majors faults. The microseismic layer may thus be an immature, downward growing detachment, and the dominant rifting mechanism might be a mode I, anelastic strain beneath the rift axis , for which a mechanical model is under development. Paleoseismological (trenching, paleoshorelines, turbidites), archeological and historical studies completed the catalogues of instrumental seismicity, motivating attempts of time dependent hazard assessment. The Near Fault Observatory of CRL is thus a multidisciplinary research infrastructure aiming at a better understanding and modeling of multiscale, coupled seismic/aseismic processes on fault systems. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence for Holocene bottom-currents erosion in the Western Gulf of Corinth, Greece
Beckers, Arnaud ULiege; Beck, Christian; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege

Poster (2014, September 10)

The Gulf of Corinth, Greece, is connected to the Ionian Sea through a 62 m deep sill. Strong tidal currents have been measured above this sill, what could potentially induce bottom-current erosion in the ... [more ▼]

The Gulf of Corinth, Greece, is connected to the Ionian Sea through a 62 m deep sill. Strong tidal currents have been measured above this sill, what could potentially induce bottom-current erosion in the Gulf. Seismic reflexion data allowed us to identify this present-day expected seafloor erosion in a wide area, as well as erosional unconformities and a wide channel between 100 and 300 m below sea level. These features highlight the possible occurrence of strong bottom-currents since the last sea level rise. [less ▲]

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See detailEarthquake imprints on 400 years of marine sedimentation in the western Gulf of Corinth, Greece
Beckers, Arnaud ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Beck, Christian et al

Poster (2014, August 18)

The Corinth rift is one of the fastest spreading rifts on Earth. In the western tip of the Rift, no major historical earthquake (Mw≥6) is known for the last 300 yrs, while the geodetic extension rate is ... [more ▼]

The Corinth rift is one of the fastest spreading rifts on Earth. In the western tip of the Rift, no major historical earthquake (Mw≥6) is known for the last 300 yrs, while the geodetic extension rate is the highest of the whole Corinth Rift. The question of seismic hazard is consequently particularly relevant. In this framework, we investigated the offshore sediments in order to look for sedimentary signature of past earthquakes. 12 short gravity cores have been retrieved in different environments: two shelves (40 and 100 m deep), one sub-basin (180 m deep) and the deep Gulf axis (330 m deep). The cores are 0.5 to 0.85 m long, permitting to analyze up to 400 yrs of sedimentation. Several sedimentological analyses have been performed: magnetic susceptibility, grain-size, XRF, ASM. Chronology is based on 137Cs and 210Pb decay. In parallel, an in-depth analysis of existing and newly found documents has been done to re-interpret macroseismic intensity fields of historical earthquakes and to build an updated earthquake catalogue for the area. These new data allowed us to estimate a macroseismic intensity threshold for submarine slope failures in the area, based on 16 reported events. Sedimentary events have been identified in all cores. On the first shelf, despite a visually homogenous, silty, sedimentation, 3 events have been highlighted by high resolution grain-size analysis and 210Pb decay profile’s disturbances. The upper one could be a back-wash flow tsunami deposit. On the second shelf, 4 high-concentration density flow deposits occurred with a recurrence time of ~58 yrs. In the canyon and in the sub-basin, sandy turbidites occurred with recurrence times of ~26 and ~56 years respectively. The possible seismic origin of these deposits is discussed based on their sedimentary characteristics and the macroseismic intensities assessed for the sediments source areas for each core location. [less ▲]

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See detailUnderstanding of the diversity of earthquake turbiditic flows in a single lake: the case of the Lake Hazar on the East Anatolian Fault
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Hage, Sophie ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege et al

Poster (2014, August)

The East Anatolian Fault (EAF) is a major left-lateral strike-slip fault accommodating with the conjugate North Anatolian Fault the westward extrusion of the Anatolian Plate away from the Arabia-Eurasia ... [more ▼]

The East Anatolian Fault (EAF) is a major left-lateral strike-slip fault accommodating with the conjugate North Anatolian Fault the westward extrusion of the Anatolian Plate away from the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. The East Anatolian Fault ruptured over most of its length during the 19th century in a series of magnitude ~7 earthquakes. During the 20th century this fault was less active with only two events of magnitude greater than 6. This absence of large earthquakes has resulted in relatively little attention being paid to the East Anatolian Fault compared to the North Anatolian Fault, which has ruptured during the last century in several earthquakes of Ms~7. To constrain the seismic history of the East Anatolian Fault in its central part, we focus on the Hazar Lake, occupying a 20 km long pull-apart basin. Short cores and long sedimentary cores were collected at three different sites to retrieve a paleoseismic record. Small correlative coarse-grained sedimentary events are identified in all cores. The age of the events is inferred combining radiocarbon and radionuclide (137 Cs and 210Pb) dating. We present here detailed analyses of three sedimentary events assigned respectively to the historical earthquakes occurring in 1789, 1513-1514, 1285. The source of the sedimentary events is different at the three sites. We combine X-ray imagery, magnetic susceptibility, grain-size and XRF measurements with thin section analysis to investigate the nature of sedimentary events. The analyses show first that the three sedimentary events are different. The magnitude of the terrigenous signal varies significantly. Second the correlative events have a different expression at the three sites. So each site has a different and specific sensitivity. In particular, an individual event can be composed of several coarse-grained sub-events of different magnitude with a time lapse in between greater than a week. The latter is reveals by the presence of bioturbation in particular by chironomids in individual thin sand layers. Thin section also shows that subevents are gradded. Each coarse-grained layer is thus a separated turbiditic flow. The site with the highest sensitivity is the one located near the near-shore steep submarine southern slopes overhanged by the steep subaerial slopes of the Hazar Mountains. The rivers draining the Hazar Mountains are ephemeral and provide a restricted sedimentary supply. In addition, seismic reflection data show that the submarine slopes do not to accumulate a significant sedimentary load. However on these steep slopes, an earthquake intensity of 6 or less is enough to trigger a slope failure and the associated turbiditic flow. We conclude that the different sub-events at this site may record a complete earthquake sequence, i.e the main-shock and its foreshocks and aftershocks. [less ▲]

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See detailHARBIYE AQUEDUCT: A RECORD OF PAST EARTHQUAKES
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Degée, Hervé ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege et al

Poster (2014, August)

This paper presents a detailed analysis of Harbiye aqueduct (Hatay, Turkey). The region is situated at the junction of two major faults (East Anatolian fault and the Dead Sea fault) and is well known for ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a detailed analysis of Harbiye aqueduct (Hatay, Turkey). The region is situated at the junction of two major faults (East Anatolian fault and the Dead Sea fault) and is well known for his important historic seismicity. The aqueduct is located close to Antioch on the Orontes (known as Antakya). The city was founded in the third century BC. Harbiye aqueduct is characterized by different stages of building (Benjelloun et al., submitted). A phase is dated to Caligula period. After the 37 AD earthquake, the aqueduct was rebuilt. We noticed the presence of two dissociated travertine and a changing of masonry material. We also observed several damages and repair structures dating from Roman time. We assume that our observations are the results of one or more earthquakes. Since the construction of the aqueduct, historical seismic records mention 13 earthquakes that provoked severe damages in the city of Antioch (Guidoboni et al. 1994, Al-Tarazi, 1999, Över et al. 2002). The last one occurred in 1872 (M=7.2). In order to test our hypothesis, we modelled the structure of the aqueduct by using FineLg, a software developed at University of Liege. The seismic signals were chosen in the European Strong-motion database (Ambraseys et al., 2002) according the following criteria: a bedrock station (to avoid site effect), a strike-slip fault mechanism and a distance between the station and the epicenter around 20-30 km. The aqueduct is located at about 25 km of the Dead Sea Fault. We tested several magnitudes for the purpose of estimate the magnitude of the earthquake(s) which destroy(s) the studied aqueduct. Our results highlight the bond between the magnitude, the damage and the weakness area of this type of structure. [less ▲]

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See detailThe paleoearthquake record of the Cinarcık Segment of the North Anatolian Fault in the Marmara Sea (Turkey) and its implication regarding past historical rupture scenario across the Marmara Sea
Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Drab, Laureen; Albini, P et al

Scientific conference (2014, July 07)

Istanbul and its 12 million inhabitants borders the Marmara Sea, a submarine pull-apart basin related to the North Anatolian Fault (NAF), a major strike slip fault that ruptures in M>7 earthquakes ... [more ▼]

Istanbul and its 12 million inhabitants borders the Marmara Sea, a submarine pull-apart basin related to the North Anatolian Fault (NAF), a major strike slip fault that ruptures in M>7 earthquakes. Constraining the recurrence rate of M>7 earthquakes that threaten the megacity is problematic because the active faults are submarine. For assessing past submarine earthquake ruptures of the Cinarcik Fault Segment located just south of Istanbul, we studied two sedimentary cores and identified seismoturbidites related to historical ruptures. Earthquake related turbidites are identified in both cores, based on their distinctive sedimentological and geochemical signatures. The seismoturbidites recorded in one of the core named Klg04 are inferred to record only mass wasting events related to the rupture on the Cinarcik Segment because of its specific geomorphological location. To constrain the seismoturbidites chronology, we combine short-lived radionuclide, radiocarbon and paleoinclination data. The first four seismoturbidites recorded match the 1894, 1509, 14th century and 989 historical earthquakes. The obtained age model allows us to discuss past historical rupture scenario across the Marmara Sea. The fact that the 1766 earthquakes are not recorded is further discussed based on new macroseismic intensity data and sedimentary records East of the Cinarcik Basin. [less ▲]

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See detailSpatiotemporal distribution of last 500 yrs turbidites in the Western Gulf of Corinth, Greece: implications for the characterization of historical earthquakes
Beckers, Arnaud ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Beck, Christian et al

Poster (2014, July 01)

The Corinth rift is one of the fastest spreading rifts on Earth. 10 earthquakes of magnitude greater than 6 occurred during the last century. The question of seismic hazard is consequently particularly ... [more ▼]

The Corinth rift is one of the fastest spreading rifts on Earth. 10 earthquakes of magnitude greater than 6 occurred during the last century. The question of seismic hazard is consequently particularly relevant. Despite a long earthquake catalogue, estimations of earthquake hazard remain problematic because of the difficulty to associate each historical event to one of the many active faults mapped in the area. Consequently, combining seismology, history and paleoseismology in an interdisciplinary approach is here necessary and is the goal of the ANR-SISCOR project. In this framework, we investigated the offshore sediments in order to (1) better constraint the length of the active offshore faults, and (2) look for sedimentary signature of historical earthquakes. 600 km of high resolution seismic reflexion data have been acquired during two surveys and 12 short gravity cores have been retrieved. The latters are 0.5 to 1 m long, allowing us to analyze about 500 yrs of sedimentation. Two new faults potentially able to trigger M>5.5 earthquakes have been mapped in the northern part of the gulf based on seismic data. Sedimentary events (turbidites sensu lato) have been identified in some cores, essentially in the deep basin and in a 180m-deep sub-basin close to the northern coast. The comparison with the critically reviewed historical records shows that some of these events could have been triggered by historical earthquakes. The link between these potential earthquakes sedimentary signatures, historical events and active faults is discussed based on intensity maps and our new active fault map. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Amik Lake in Southern Turkey over the last 4000 years, a new paleoseismological record of ruptures along the Northern Dead Sea Fault
Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; El Ouahabi, Meriam ULiege; Lebeau, Hèlène et al

Poster (2014, June 30)

The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake occupying the central part of a pull-apart basin. The Basin is crossed by The Dead Sea Fault (DSF), a major neotectonic structure in the Middle ... [more ▼]

The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake occupying the central part of a pull-apart basin. The Basin is crossed by The Dead Sea Fault (DSF), a major neotectonic structure in the Middle East extending from the Red Sea in the south to the East Anatolian Fault Zone in the north. Around the Amik Basin, continuous human occupation is attested since 6000-7000 BC. Indeed the low-lying Amuq plain is covered by tell settlements first explored by Robert Braidwood in the 1930s. Our objective in this presentation is to look at major paleo-environmental changes recorded in the Amik Lake over the last 4000 years and in particular its potential paleoseimic sedimentary record. The lake has been drained and progressively dried up since the mid-50s so that it is not watered during the summer season and constitutes a unique opportunity to collect sediment records. Sediments were collected at 1 cm to 2 cm intervals in a trench and in cores up to a depth of 5 meters in the clay deposits. A diverse array of complementary methods is applied to study the records: magnetic susceptibility, grain size, organic matter and inorganic carbon (L.O.I), XRD mineralogy, XRF geochemistry, carbon geochemistry and clay mineralogy. The age of the record is constrained combining radionuclide and radiocarbon dating. The sedimentary record shows large earthquake related structural disturbances and smaller siliciclastic sedimentary events. The siliciclastic input would be related to enhanced detritical sedimentation related to earthquake shaking. The latter is further investigated looking at intensities and shake maps related to the last 19th century M>7 earthquakes in the area and landslide prone area in the lake catchment. [less ▲]

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See detailPaléosismologie marine et failles actives dans le golfe de Corinthe (Grèce)
Beckers, Arnaud ULiege; Beck, Christian; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege et al

Scientific conference (2014, May 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (6 ULiège)
See detailContribution of a new active faults map and sedimentary cores to the characterization of seismogenic sources in an interdisciplinary approach (Western Gulf of Corinth, Greece)
Beckers, Arnaud ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Beck, Christian et al

Conference (2014, April 28)

The Corinth rift is one of the fastest spreading rifts on Earth. 5 earthquakes of magnitude greater than 5.8 occurred during the last 40 years. The question of seismic hazard is consequently particularly ... [more ▼]

The Corinth rift is one of the fastest spreading rifts on Earth. 5 earthquakes of magnitude greater than 5.8 occurred during the last 40 years. The question of seismic hazard is consequently particularly relevant. Despite a long earthquake catalogue, estimations of earthquake hazard remain problematic because of the difficulty to associate each historical event to one of the many active faults mapped in the area. Consequently, combining seismology, history and paleoseismology in an interdisciplinary approach is here necessary and is the goal of the ANR-SISCOR project. In this framework, we investigated the offshore sediments in order to (1) better constraint the length of the active offshore faults, and (2) look for sedimentary signature of historical earthquakes. 600 km of high resolution seismic reflexion data have been acquired during two surveys and 12 short gravity cores have been retrieved. The latters are 0.5 to 1 m long, allowing us to analyze about 500 yrs of sedimentation. Two new faults potentially able to trigger M>5.5 earthquakes have been mapped in the northern part of the gulf based on seismic data. Sedimentary events (turbidites and mud flows) have been identified in some cores, essentially in the deep basin and in a 180m-deep sub-basin close to the northern coast. The comparison with the critically reviewed historical records shows that some of these events could have been triggered by historical earthquakes. The link between these potential earthquakes sedimentary signatures, historical events and active faults is discussed based on intensity maps and our new active fault map. [less ▲]

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See detailA semi-quantitative method to estimate organic matter content of lake sediments using ITRAX micro-XRF core scanner data
Avsar, Ulas; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Jónsson, S. et al

in EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts 16 (2014, April)

Organic matter (OM) content of lake sediments may provide valuable information about the past depositional processes and environments. It is most commonly obtained by loss-on-ignition (LOI550) method ... [more ▼]

Organic matter (OM) content of lake sediments may provide valuable information about the past depositional processes and environments. It is most commonly obtained by loss-on-ignition (LOI550) method, which is based on burning the OM in sediments at 550 °C for 4 hours. In addition to LOI550, OM content of sediments can be determined by total organic carbon (TOC) measurements by elemental analyzers. LOI550 is a simple and inexpensive method by which upto 50 samples can be measured per day. However, it is not reliable for sediments containing OM less than 8-10%. TOC measurements, on the other hand, can be reliable for sediments containing minor amounts of OM, ~1% or even less. However, TOC measurements are more expensive and require more pre-treatments such as carbonate removal and grinding etc. For both methods, it is unlikely to achieve measurement resolution more than 5 mm. ITRAX micro-XRF core scanner, which can provide variations of 15-20 elements along sediment cores, can reach measurement increments as fine as 0.2 mm. Even though ITRAX can produce high-resolution data in relatively short times with minor labour, the produced data suffers from a major weakness. OM content, particle size-distribution, mineralogical and density variations may significantly affect the results. This study illustrates how this weakness can be used to estimate OM content of sediments at resolutions that cannot be achieved by conventional LOI550 and TOC methods. A total of 19 m-long sediment cores from four lakes in Turkey and one lake in Iceland were scanned by ITRAX at 0.5-2.0 mm resolution. OM content of the sediments was quantified by 970 LOI550 and 490 TOC measurements at 1-2 cm increments. Multiple regression analysis was utilized to generate formulas specific to each lake in order to estimate the measured OM content values by ITRAX data. Accordingly, the generated formulas successfully provided estimations with correlation coefficient values (r2) around 0.95. Even if the formulas were generated based on the measurements at 10 cm increments, the original OM content values (i.e., at 1-2 cm increments) could be estimated with correlation coefficient values around 0.85. The current results show that millimetre-scale OM content approximations can be obtained by this method. [less ▲]

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See detailPaleoenvironmental record of the Amik Basin (Amuq Plain, Southern Turkey) over the last 4000 years
Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; El Ouahabi, Meriam ULiege; Lebeau, Hélène ULiege et al

Poster (2014, February 04)

Continous human occupation is attested in the Amik Basin since 6000-7000 BC. The low-lying Amuq plain is covered by tell settlements first explored by Robert Braidwood in the 1930s. The Basin also is ... [more ▼]

Continous human occupation is attested in the Amik Basin since 6000-7000 BC. The low-lying Amuq plain is covered by tell settlements first explored by Robert Braidwood in the 1930s. The Basin also is crossed by The Dead Sea Fault (DSF), a major neotectonic structure in the Middle East extending from the Red Sea in the south to Turkey in the north. The study focuses on the sedimentary record of the Amik Lake occupying the central part of the Basin. Our objective is to constrain major paleo-environmental changes in the area over the last 4000 years and assess possible human impact. The lake has been drained and progressively dried up since the mid-50s so that it is not watered during the summer season and constitutes a unique opportunity to collect sediment records. Sediments were collected at 1 cm to 2 cm intervals in a trench and in cores up to a depth of 5 meters in the clay deposits. A diverse array of complementary methods is applied to study the records: magnetic susceptibility, grain size, organic matter and inorganic carbon (L.O.I), XRD mineralogy, XRF geochemistry, carbon geochemistry. The age of the record is constrained combining radionuclide and radiocarbon dating. The record shows two intense phases of soil erosion with enrichments in Chromium and Nickel. The most recent erosion phase might be linked with enhanced development during the Roman and the growth of the Antioch City. The oldest one would occur around 3000 BC. The record also allows reconstructing past lake level variations and discusses the results in comparison with variations of the Dead Sea. [less ▲]

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See detailMarine paleoseismology in the Western Gulf of Corinth (Greece) for the last 500 years
Beckers, Arnaud ULiege; Mortier, Clément; Beck, Christian et al

Scientific conference (2014, January 15)

Related to the Gulf of Corinth rifting, five earthquakes of magnitude greater than 5.8 occurred in the last 35 years. Consequently, the question of earthquake (EQ) hazard is particularly relevant. Onland ... [more ▼]

Related to the Gulf of Corinth rifting, five earthquakes of magnitude greater than 5.8 occurred in the last 35 years. Consequently, the question of earthquake (EQ) hazard is particularly relevant. Onland, paleoseismological data are scarce and offshore data were absent before the present study. We investigated recent sediments bounding three well-defined major seismogenic faults. We retrieved 12 gravity cores from 50 to 85 cm long in three distinct sites: the southern shelf (40 to 50 m deep), a 180 m deep sub-basin, and a transect from the southern coast to the center of the gulf. We performed grain size analysis, magnetic susceptibility, loss on ignition and geochemical (X-Ray Fluorescence) measurements on cores from each site. We sought to identify layers potentially attributed to EQ-related processes like liquefaction and tsunamis for the sites on the shelves or mass transport and turbidity currents for the basins. Chronology is based on 137Cs (Atmospheric Nuclear Experiments) and 210Pb decay. Considering sedimentation rates estimates in these areas, the longer cores record about 500 years of sedimentary archives. On the southern shelf, 3 coarser layers have been identified at identical depth in 3 cores. 210Pb decay show erosion just under the first event that we attributed to the 1995 tsunami (backwash flow deposit). In the 180m deep sub-basin, among 3 clear grain-size peaks, two have been attributed to the 1817 Aegion EQ and the 1660 Galaxidi EQ. In last site, 10 “events” (grain-size and Zr/Rb peaks) have been identified in the deepest part of the transect 4 on the shelf. Their analysis is in progress, as well as paleomagnetic measurements. [less ▲]

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See detailA 3400 year lacustrine paleoseismic record from the North Anatolian Fault, Turkey: Implications for bimodal recurrence behavior
Avsar, Ulas; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; De Batist, Marc et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2014), 41(2), 377-384

High-resolution physical, geochemical, and geochronological analyses on the sedimentary sequence of Yeniçağa Lake, located in a fault-bounded basin along the North Anatolian Fault, reveal fingerprints of ... [more ▼]

High-resolution physical, geochemical, and geochronological analyses on the sedimentary sequence of Yeniçağa Lake, located in a fault-bounded basin along the North Anatolian Fault, reveal fingerprints of paleoearthquakes. A robust sediment chronology, spanning the last 3400 years, is constructed by radiocarbon dating and time-stratigraphical correlation with the precisely dated Sofular Cave speleothem record. Yeniçağa sedimentary sequence contains 11 seismically induced event deposits characterized by siliciclastic-enriched intervals. Some of the event deposits are also associated with implications of sudden lake deepening, which may be related to coseismic subsidence. The paleoearthquake series having an average recurrence interval of ca. 260 years are interrupted by two possible seismic gaps of ca. 420 and 540 years. [less ▲]

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See detailSeismically-triggered organic-rich layers in recent sediments from lake Gollukoy (North Anatolian Fault, Turkey
Avşar, Ulaş; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; De Batist, Marc et al

in Quaternary Science Reviews (2014), 103

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (15 ULiège)
See detailLate Quaternay sedimentation and active faulting in the Western tip of the Gulf of Corinth, Greece
Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Beckers, Arnaud ULiege; Beck, Christian et al

Poster (2013, November 06)

The Gulf of Corinth is one of the fastest-spreading intracontinental rifts on Earth. Present day kinematics (GPS data) indicates an opening direction oriented NNE-SSW and an opening rate increasing ... [more ▼]

The Gulf of Corinth is one of the fastest-spreading intracontinental rifts on Earth. Present day kinematics (GPS data) indicates an opening direction oriented NNE-SSW and an opening rate increasing westward from 11 mm y-1 in the central part to 16 mm y-1 in the westernmost part. A significant part of the deformation is localized offshore, where the fault geometry was not well known yet. The high extension rate would imply a high seismic hazard if faults are not creeping. We propose an accurate map of submarine faults in the western extremity of the Gulf of Corinth. The map is based on two high-resolution seismic reflection surveys (single channel sparker) performed aboard HCMR’s R/V ALKYON, within the frame of SISCOR ANR Project. About 600 km of seismic lines were acquired, with a 200 msTWTT maximum penetration down to what we infer to represent the MIS 5 discontinuity. Depocenters location is controlled by river deltas where up to 75m of post-LGM sediments are stored. Numerous, up to 15m thick, mass transport deposits fill the central and eastern parts. In the eastern part, the sedimentary infill is faulted by the known North Eratini, South Eratini and West Channel faults. At the longitude of the Trizonia Island, the seafloor in mainly horizontal and the only fault is the south dipping Trizonia fault. Between the Trizonia Island and the Mornos Delta, the shallower northern part of the gulf shows a diffuse pattern of deformation with faults striking mainly E-W and ESE-WNW. It shows south and north dipping normal faults, strike-slip faults, as well as an inherited basement relief. To the West, three young grabens have been identified, striking NE-SW and W-E. The northern, 6 km long, fault in this grabens system shows a clear strike-slip component (fig.1). [less ▲]

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See detailPotential paleoseismological records in the Western Gulf of Corinth sediments (Greece) for the last 500 years
Beckers, Arnaud ULiege; Mortier, Clément; Beck, Christian et al

Conference (2013, November 06)

Related to the Gulf of Corinth rifting, five earthquakes of magnitude greater than 5.8 occurred in the last 35 years. Consequently, the question of earthquake (EQ) hazard is particularly relevant. Onland ... [more ▼]

Related to the Gulf of Corinth rifting, five earthquakes of magnitude greater than 5.8 occurred in the last 35 years. Consequently, the question of earthquake (EQ) hazard is particularly relevant. Onland paleoseismological data are scarce and offshore data were absent before the present study. We investigated recent sediments bounding three well-defined major seismogenic faults: Aegion, Trizonia and Psathopyrgos faults. We retrieved 12 gravity cores from 50 to 85 cm long in three distinct sites: the southern shelf (40 to 50 m deep), a 180 m deep sub-basin, and a transect from the southern coast to the center of the gulf. Chronology is based on 137Cs (Atmospheric Nuclear Experiments) and 210Pb decay for two sites (Aegion and Trizonia). Considering sedimentation rates estimates in these areas, the longer cores record about 500 years of sedimentary archives. We performed granulometry, magnetic susceptibility, loss on ignition and geochemical (X-Ray Fluorescence) measurements on cores from each site. Some samples were observed with a binocular to identify the nature of the grains. We sought to identify layers potentially attributed to EQ-related processes like liquefaction and tsunamis for the sites on the shelves or mass transport and turbidity currents for the basins. In Aegion, 3 coarser layers have been identified at identical depth in 3 cores across the scarp. 210Pb decay show erosion just under the first event, that we attributed to the 1995 tsunami (backwash deposit) (figure). In the Trizonia Sub-Basin, among 3 clear grain-size peaks, two have been attributed to the 1817 Aegion EQ and the 1660 Galaxidi EQ. In Psathopyrgos, 10 “events” (grain-size and Zr/Rb peaks) have been identified in the deepest part of the transect and at least 2 on the shelf. Their analysis is in progress. [less ▲]

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