Publications of Michaël Gillon
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See detailWASP-167b/KELT-13b: Joint discovery of a hot Jupiter transiting a rapidly-rotating F1V star
Temple, L. Y.; Hellier, C.; Albrow, M. D. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2017), 471(3), 2743-2752

We report the joint WASP/KELT discovery of WASP-167b/KELT-13b, a transiting hot Jupiter with a 2.02-d orbit around a $V$ = 10.5, F1V star with [Fe/H] = 0.1 $\pm$ 0.1. The 1.5 R$_{\rm Jup}$ planet was ... [more ▼]

We report the joint WASP/KELT discovery of WASP-167b/KELT-13b, a transiting hot Jupiter with a 2.02-d orbit around a $V$ = 10.5, F1V star with [Fe/H] = 0.1 $\pm$ 0.1. The 1.5 R$_{\rm Jup}$ planet was confirmed by Doppler tomography of the stellar line profiles during transit. We place a limit of $<$ 8 M$_{\rm Jup}$ on its mass. The planet is in a retrograde orbit with a sky-projected spin-orbit angle of $\lambda = -165^{\circ} \pm 5^{\circ}$. This is in agreement with the known tendency for orbits around hotter stars to be more likely to be misaligned. WASP-167/KELT-13 is one of the few systems where the stellar rotation period is less than the planetary orbital period. We find evidence of non-radial stellar pulsations in the host star, making it a $\delta$-Scuti or $\gamma$-Dor variable. The similarity to WASP-33, a previously known hot-Jupiter host with pulsations, adds to the suggestion that close-in planets might be able to excite stellar pulsations. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the dust environment of long period comets observed with TRAPPIST
Pozuelos Romero, Francisco José ULiege; Jehin, Emmanuel ULiege; Opitom, Cyrielle et al

Poster (2017, April)

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See detailGas and dust production rates of comets 41P and 45P from TRAPPIST
Jehin, Emmanuel ULiege; Opitom, Cyrielle; Moulane, Youssef ULiege et al

Poster (2017, April)

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See detailStudy of comets activity with the TRAPPIST-North telescope
Moulane, Youssef ULiege; Jehin, Emmanuel ULiege; Manfroid, Jean ULiege et al

Poster (2017, April)

TRAPPIST-North (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) is a 60-cm robotic telescope that was installed in May, 2016 at the Oukaimeden Observatory. The project is led by the University of ... [more ▼]

TRAPPIST-North (TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope) is a 60-cm robotic telescope that was installed in May, 2016 at the Oukaimeden Observatory. The project is led by the University of Liège (Belgium) and the Caddi Ayad University of Marrakech (Morocco). TRAPPIST-North (TN) is a twin of TRAPPIST-South (TS) telescope which was installed at the ESO La Silla Observatory in 2010. The TRAPPIST telescopes are dedicated to the detection and characterization of planets orbiting stars other than our Sun (exoplanets) and the study of comets and other small bodies in our solar system. These telescopes have a very sensitive CCD camera with complete sets of cometary narrow band filters in order to measure the production rates of several gas species (OH, NH, CN, C3 and C2 ) and the dust. With TRAPPIST-North we can now also observe comets in the Northem hemisphere. Therefore, with the two telescopes, we can now observe continuously the comets around their orbit. We present in this work our strategy to study the evolution of the activity, chemical composition, dust properties, and coma morphology of several comets per year and of different origins over a wide range of heliocentric distances, and on both sides of perihelion. We will measure the production rates of each daughter molecules using a Haser model, in addition to the Afρ parameter to track the activity and the dust properties will be obtained through Monte Carlo models. We present the first measurements of the production rates and Afρ parameter of comet 41P/Tuttle-Giacobini-Kresak before perihelion (r=1.04 AU) and of comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova after perihelion (r=0.53 AU), that we observed with TRAPPIST telescopes. [less ▲]

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See detailReconnaissance of the TRAPPIST-1 exoplanet system in the Lyman-α line
Bourrier, V.; Ehrenreich, D.; Wheatley, P. J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2017), 599

The TRAPPIST-1 system offers the opportunity to characterize terrestrial, potentially habitable planets orbiting a nearby ultracool dwarf star. We performed a four-orbit reconnaissance with the Space ... [more ▼]

The TRAPPIST-1 system offers the opportunity to characterize terrestrial, potentially habitable planets orbiting a nearby ultracool dwarf star. We performed a four-orbit reconnaissance with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope to study the stellar emission at Lyman-α, to assess the presence of hydrogen exospheres around the two inner planets, and to determine their UV irradiation. We detect the Lyman-α line of TRAPPIST-1, making it the coldest exoplanet host star for which this line has been measured. We reconstruct the intrinsic line profile, showing that it lacks broad wings and is much fainter than expected from the stellar X-ray emission. TRAPPIST-1 has a similar X-ray emission as Proxima Cen but a much lower Ly-α emission. This suggests that TRAPPIST-1 chromosphere is only moderately active compared to its transition region and corona. We estimated the atmospheric mass loss rates for all planets, and found that despite a moderate extreme UV emission the total XUV irradiation could be strong enough to strip the atmospheres of the inner planets in a few billions years. We detect marginal flux decreases at the times of TRAPPIST-1b and c transits, which might originate from stellar activity, but could also hint at the presence of extended hydrogen exospheres. Understanding the origin of these Lyman-α variations will be crucial in assessing the atmospheric stability and potential habitability of the TRAPPIST-1 planets. [less ▲]

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See detailTwo massive rocky planets transiting a K-dwarf 6.5 parsecs away
Gillon, Michaël ULiege; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Van Grootel, Valérie ULiege et al

in Nature Astronomy (2017), 1

HD 219134 is a K-dwarf star at a distance of 6.5 parsecs around which several low-mass planets were recently discovered[SUP]1,2[/SUP]. The Spitzer Space Telescope detected a transit of the innermost of ... [more ▼]

HD 219134 is a K-dwarf star at a distance of 6.5 parsecs around which several low-mass planets were recently discovered[SUP]1,2[/SUP]. The Spitzer Space Telescope detected a transit of the innermost of these planets, HD 219134 b, whose mass and radius (4.5 M[SUB]⊕[/SUB] and 1.6 R[SUB]⊕[/SUB] respectively) are consistent with a rocky composition[SUP]1[/SUP]. Here, we report new high-precision time-series photometry of the star acquired with Spitzer revealing that the second innermost planet of the system, HD 219134c, is also transiting. A global analysis of the Spitzer transit light curves and the most up-to-date HARPS-N velocity data set yields mass and radius estimations of 4.74 ± 0.19 M[SUB]⊕[/SUB] and 1.602 ± 0.055 R[SUB]⊕[/SUB] for HD 219134 b, and of 4.36 ± 0.22 M[SUB]⊕[/SUB] and 1.511 ± 0.047 R[SUB]⊕[/SUB] for HD 219134 c. These values suggest rocky compositions for both planets. Thanks to the proximity and the small size of their host star (0.778 ± 0.005 R[SUB]⊙[/SUB])[SUP]3[/SUP], these two transiting exoplanets — the nearest to the Earth yet found — are well suited for a detailed characterization (for example, precision of a few per cent on mass and radius, and constraints on the atmospheric properties) that could give important constraints on the nature and formation mechanism of the ubiquitous short-period planets of a few Earth masses. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-South transiting exoplanets: WASP-130b, WASP-131b, WASP-132b, WASP-139b, WASP-140b, WASP-141b & WASP-142b
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2017), 465

We describe seven new exoplanets transiting stars of V = 10.1 to 12.4. WASP-130b is a "warm Jupiter" having an orbital period of 11.6 d, the longest yet found by WASP. It transits a V = 11.1, G6 star with ... [more ▼]

We describe seven new exoplanets transiting stars of V = 10.1 to 12.4. WASP-130b is a "warm Jupiter" having an orbital period of 11.6 d, the longest yet found by WASP. It transits a V = 11.1, G6 star with [Fe/H] = +0.26. Warm Jupiters tend to have smaller radii than hot Jupiters, and WASP-130b is in line with this trend (1.23 Mjup; 0.89 Rjup). WASP-131b is a bloated Saturn-mass planet (0.27 Mjup; 1.22 Rjup). Its large scale height coupled with the V = 10.1 brightness of its host star make the planet a good target for atmospheric characterisation. WASP-132b is among the least irradiated and coolest of WASP planets, being in a 7.1-d orbit around a K4 star. It has a low mass and a modest radius (0.41 Mjup; 0.87 Rjup). The V = 12.4, [Fe/H] = +0.22 star shows a possible rotational modulation at 33 d. WASP-139b is the lowest-mass planet yet found by WASP, at 0.12 Mjup and 0.80 Rjup. It is a "super-Neptune" akin to HATS-7b and HATS-8b. It orbits a V = 12.4, [Fe/H] = +0.20, K0 star. The star appears to be anomalously dense, akin to HAT-P-11. WASP-140b is a 2.4-Mjup planet in a 2.2-d orbit that is both eccentric (e = 0.047) and with a grazing transit (b = 0.93) The timescale for tidal circularisation is likely to be the lowest of all known eccentric hot Jupiters. The planet's radius is large (1.4 Rjup), but uncertain owing to the grazing transit. The host star is a V = 11.1, [Fe/H] = +0.12, K0 dwarf showing a prominent 10.4-d rotational modulation. The dynamics of this system are worthy of further investigation. WASP-141b is a typical hot Jupiter, being a 2.7 Mjup, 1.2 Rjup planet in a 3.3-d orbit around a V = 12.4, [Fe/H] = +0.29, F9 star. WASP-142b is a typical bloated hot Jupiter (0.84 Mjup, 1.53 Rjup) in a 2.1-d orbit around a V = 12.3, [Fe/H] = +0.26, F8 star. [less ▲]

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See detailSeven temperate terrestrial planets around the nearby ultracool dwarf star
Gillon, Michaël ULiege; Triaud, Amaury; Demory, Brice-Olivier et al

in Nature (2017), 542

One focus of modern astronomy is to detect temperate terrestrial exoplanets well-suited for atmospheric characterisation. A milestone was recently achieved with the detection of three Earth-sized planets ... [more ▼]

One focus of modern astronomy is to detect temperate terrestrial exoplanets well-suited for atmospheric characterisation. A milestone was recently achieved with the detection of three Earth-sized planets transiting (i.e. passing in front of) a star just 8% the mass of the Sun 12 parsecs away. Indeed, the transiting configuration of these planets combined with the Jupiter-like size of their host star - named TRAPPIST-1 - makes possible indepth studies of their atmospheric properties with current and future astronomical facilities. Here we report the results of an intensive photometric monitoring campaign of that star from the ground and with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our observations reveal that at least seven planets with sizes and masses similar to the Earth revolve around TRAPPIST-1. The six inner planets form a near-resonant chain such that their orbital periods (1.51, 2.42, 4.04, 6.06, 9.21, 12.35 days) are near ratios of small integers. This architecture suggests that the planets formed farther from the star and migrated inward. The seven planets have equilibrium temperatures low enough to make possible liquid water on their surfaces. [less ▲]

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See detailStrong XUV irradiation of the Earth-sized exoplanets orbiting the ultracool dwarf TRAPPIST-1
Wheatley, Peter J.; Louden, Tom; Bourrier, Vincent et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2017), 465

We present an XMM-Newton X-ray observation of TRAPPIST-1, which is an ultracool dwarf star recently discovered to host three transiting and temperate Earth-sized planets. We find the star is a relatively ... [more ▼]

We present an XMM-Newton X-ray observation of TRAPPIST-1, which is an ultracool dwarf star recently discovered to host three transiting and temperate Earth-sized planets. We find the star is a relatively strong and variable coronal X-ray source with an X-ray luminosity similar to that of the quiet Sun, despite its much lower bolometric luminosity. We find L_x/L_bol=2-4x10^-4, with the total XUV emission in the range L_xuv/L_bol=6-9x10^-4. Using a simple energy-limited model we show that the relatively close-in Earth-sized planets, which span the classical habitable zone of the star, are subject to sufficient X-ray and EUV irradiation to significantly alter their primary and perhaps secondary atmospheres. Understanding whether this high-energy irradiation makes the planets more or less habitable is a complex question, but our measured fluxes will be an important input to the necessary models of atmospheric evolution. [less ▲]

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See detailSearching for Rapid Orbital Decay of WASP-18b
Wilkins, Ashlee N.; Delrez, Laetitia ULiege; Barker, Adrian J. et al

in Astrophysical Journal. Letters (2017), 836

The WASP-18 system, with its massive and extremely close-in planet, WASP-18b (M [SUB] p [/SUB] = 10.3M [SUB] J [/SUB], a = 0.02 au, P = 22.6 hr), is one of the best-known exoplanet laboratories to ... [more ▼]

The WASP-18 system, with its massive and extremely close-in planet, WASP-18b (M [SUB] p [/SUB] = 10.3M [SUB] J [/SUB], a = 0.02 au, P = 22.6 hr), is one of the best-known exoplanet laboratories to directly measure Q‧, the modified tidal quality factor and proxy for efficiency of tidal dissipation, of the host star. Previous analysis predicted a rapid orbital decay of the planet toward its host star that should be measurable on the timescale of a few years, if the star is as dissipative as is inferred from the circularization of close-in solar-type binary stars. We have compiled published transit and secondary eclipse timing (as observed by WASP, TRAPPIST, and Spitzer) with more recent unpublished light curves (as observed by TRAPPIST and Hubble Space Telescope) with coverage spanning nine years. We find no signature of a rapid decay. We conclude that the absence of rapid orbital decay most likely derives from Q‧ being larger than was inferred from solar-type stars and find that Q‧ ≥ 1 × 10[SUP]6[/SUP], at 95% confidence; this supports previous work suggesting that F stars, with their convective cores and thin convective envelopes, are significantly less tidally dissipative than solar-type stars, with radiative cores and large convective envelopes. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst limits on the occurrence rate of short-period planets orbiting brown dwarfs
He, Matthias Y.; Triaud, Amaury H. M. J.; Gillon, Michaël ULiege

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2017), 464

Planet formation theories predict a large but still undetected population of short-period terrestrial planets orbiting brown dwarfs. Should specimens of this population be discovered transiting relatively ... [more ▼]

Planet formation theories predict a large but still undetected population of short-period terrestrial planets orbiting brown dwarfs. Should specimens of this population be discovered transiting relatively bright and nearby brown dwarfs, the Jupiter-size and the low luminosity of their hosts would make them exquisite targets for detailed atmospheric characterisation with JWST and future ground-based facilities. The eventual discovery and detailed study of a significant sample of transiting terrestrial planets orbiting nearby brown dwarfs could prove to be useful not only for comparative exoplanetology but also for astrobiology, by bringing us key information on the physical requirements and timescale for the emergence of life. In this context, we present a search for transit-signals in archival time-series photometry acquired by the Spitzer Space Telescope for a sample of 44 nearby brown dwarfs. While these 44 targets were not particularly selected for their brightness, the high precision of their Spitzer light curves allows us to reach sensitivities below Earth-sized planets for 75% of the sample and down to Europa-sized planets on the brighter targets. We could not identify any unambiguous planetary signal. Instead, we could compute the first limits on the presence of planets on close-in orbits. We find that within a 1.28 day orbit, the occurrence rate of planets with a radius between 0.75 and 3.25 R$_\oplus$ is {\eta} < 67 $\pm$ 1%. For planets with radii between 0.75 and 1.25 R$_\oplus$, we place a 95% confident upper limit of {\eta} < 87 $\pm$ 3%. If we assume an occurrence rate of {\eta} = 27% for these planets with radii between 0.75 and 1.25 R$_\oplus$, as the discoveries of the Kepler-42b and TRAPPIST-1b systems would suggest, we estimate that 175 brown dwarfs need to be monitored in order to guarantee (95%) at least one detection. [less ▲]

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See detailWater loss from terrestrial planets orbiting ultracool dwarfs: implications for the planets of TRAPPIST-1
Bolmont, E.; Selsis, F.; Owen, J. E. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2017), 464

Ultracool dwarfs (UCD; $T_{\rm eff}<\sim3000~$K) cool to settle on the main sequence after $\sim$1 Gyr. For brown dwarfs, this cooling never stops. Their habitable zone (HZ) thus sweeps inward at least ... [more ▼]

Ultracool dwarfs (UCD; $T_{\rm eff}<\sim3000~$K) cool to settle on the main sequence after $\sim$1 Gyr. For brown dwarfs, this cooling never stops. Their habitable zone (HZ) thus sweeps inward at least during the first Gyr of their lives. Assuming they possess water, planets found in the HZ of UCDs have experienced a runaway greenhouse phase too hot for liquid water prior to entering the HZ. It has been proposed that such planets are desiccated by this hot early phase and enter the HZ as dry worlds. Here we model the water loss during this pre-HZ hot phase taking into account recent upper limits on the XUV emission of UCDs and using 1D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. We address the whole range of UCDs but also focus on the planets recently found around the $0.08~M_\odot$ dwarf TRAPPIST-1. Despite assumptions maximizing the FUV-photolysis of water and the XUV-driven escape of hydrogen, we find that planets can retain significant amounts of water in the HZ of UCDs, with a sweet spot in the $0.04$-$0.06~M_\odot$ range. We also studied the TRAPPIST-1 system using observed constraints on the XUV-flux. We find that TRAPPIST-1b and c may have lost as much as 15 Earth Oceans and planet d -- which might be inside the HZ -- may have lost less than 1 Earth Ocean. Depending on their initial water contents, they could have enough water to remain habitable. TRAPPIST-1 planets are key targets for atmospheric characterization and could provide strong constraints on the water erosion around UCDs. [less ▲]

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See detailRossiter-McLaughlin models and their effect on estimates of stellar rotation, illustrated using six WASP systems
Brown, D. J. A.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Doyle, A. P. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2017), 464

We present new measurements of the projected spin--orbit angle $\lambda$ for six WASP hot Jupiters, four of which are new to the literature (WASP-61, -62, -76, and -78), and two of which are new analyses ... [more ▼]

We present new measurements of the projected spin--orbit angle $\lambda$ for six WASP hot Jupiters, four of which are new to the literature (WASP-61, -62, -76, and -78), and two of which are new analyses of previously measured systems using new data (WASP-71, and -79). We use three different models based on two different techniques: radial velocity measurements of the Rossiter--McLaughlin effect, and Doppler tomography. Our comparison of the different models reveals that they produce projected stellar rotation velocities ($v \sin I_{\rm s}$) measurements often in disagreement with each other and with estimates obtained from spectral line broadening. The Bou\'e model for the Rossiter--McLaughlin effect consistently underestimates the value of $v\sin I_{\rm s}$ compared to the Hirano model. Although $v \sin I_s$ differed, the effect on $\lambda$ was small for our sample, with all three methods producing values in agreement with each other. Using Doppler tomography, we find that WASP-61\,b ($\lambda=4^\circ.0^{+17.1}_{-18.4}$), WASP-71\,b ($\lambda=-1^\circ.9^{+7.1}_{-7.5}$), and WASP-78\,b ($\lambda=-6^\circ.4\pm5.9$) are aligned. WASP-62\,b ($\lambda=19^\circ.4^{+5.1}_{-4.9}$) is found to be slightly misaligned, while WASP-79\,b ($\lambda=-95^\circ.2^{+0.9}_{-1.0}$) is confirmed to be strongly misaligned and has a retrograde orbit. We explore a range of possibilities for the orbit of WASP-76\,b, finding that the orbit is likely to be strongly misaligned in the positive $\lambda$ direction. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of the potential of the new Belgo-Moroccan telescope TRAPPIST-North for high-precision exoplanet transit photometry
Barkaoui, Khalid; Gillon, Michaël ULiege; Benkhaldoun, Zouhair et al

in Journal of Physics: Conference Series (2017), 869(1),

We present the observation of a transit of the exoplanet TrES-3b by the newly commissioned robotic telescope TRAPPIST-North located at Oukaimeden Observatory (Morocco). The obtained light curve reaches a ... [more ▼]

We present the observation of a transit of the exoplanet TrES-3b by the newly commissioned robotic telescope TRAPPIST-North located at Oukaimeden Observatory (Morocco). The obtained light curve reaches a photometric precison 600 ppm. Its Bayesian analysis with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code enables us to refine the radius of the planet to Rp = 1.346+0.065 -0.050 RJup. These results demonstrate the high potential of TRAPPIST-North for high-photometry of exoplanet transits. © Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailHubble Case Studies of Transiting Giant Exoplanets
Wilkins, Ashlee N.; Deming, Drake; Barker, Adrian et al

in American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts \#229 (2017)

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See detailFrom Dense Hot Jupiter to Low Density Neptune: The Discovery of WASP-127b, WASP-136b and WASP-138b
Lam, K. W. F.; Faedi, F.; Brown, D. J. A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2017), 599

We report three newly discovered exoplanets from the SuperWASP survey. WASP-127b is a heavily inflated super-Neptune of mass 0.18Mj and radius 1.35Rj. This is one of the least massive planets discovered ... [more ▼]

We report three newly discovered exoplanets from the SuperWASP survey. WASP-127b is a heavily inflated super-Neptune of mass 0.18Mj and radius 1.35Rj. This is one of the least massive planets discovered by the WASP project. It orbits a bright host star (V = 10.16) of spectral type G5 with a period of 4.17 days.WASP-127b is a low density planet which has an extended atmosphere with a scale height of 2500+/-400 km, making it an ideal candidate for transmission spectroscopy. WASP-136b and WASP-138b are both hot Jupiters with mass and radii of 1.51 Mj and 1.38 Rj, and 1.22 Mj and 1.09 Rj, respectively. WASP-136b is in a 5.22-day orbit around an F9 subgiant star with a mass of 1.41 Msun and a radius of 2.21 Rsun. The discovery of WASP-136b could help constraint the characteristics of the giant planet population around evolved stars. WASP-138b orbits an F7 star with a period of 3.63 days. Its radius agrees with theoretical values from standard models, suggesting the presence of a heavy element core with a mass of 10 Mearth. The discovery of these new planets helps in exploring the diverse compositional range of short-period planets, and will aid our understanding of the physical characteristics of both gas giants and low density planets. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-157b, a Transiting Hot Jupiter Observed with K2
Močnik, T.; Anderson, D. R.; Brown, D. J. A. et al

in Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (2016), 970

We announce the discovery of the transiting hot Jupiter WASP-157b in a 3.95-d orbit around a V = 12.9 G2 main-sequence star. This moderately inflated planet has a Saturn-like density with a mass of $0.57 ... [more ▼]

We announce the discovery of the transiting hot Jupiter WASP-157b in a 3.95-d orbit around a V = 12.9 G2 main-sequence star. This moderately inflated planet has a Saturn-like density with a mass of $0.57 \pm 0.10$ M$_{\rm Jup}$ and a radius of $1.06 \pm 0.05$ R$_{\rm Jup}$. We do not detect any rotational or phase-curve modulations, nor the secondary eclipse, with conservative semi-amplitude upper limits of 250 and 20 ppm, respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-92b, WASP-93b and WASP-118b: Three new transiting close-in giant planets
Hay, K. L.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Doyle, A. P. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2016), 463

We present the discovery of three new transiting giant planets, first detected with the WASP telescopes, and establish their planetary nature with follow up spectroscopy and ground-based photometric ... [more ▼]

We present the discovery of three new transiting giant planets, first detected with the WASP telescopes, and establish their planetary nature with follow up spectroscopy and ground-based photometric lightcurves. WASP-92 is an F7 star, with a moderately inflated planet orbiting with a period of 2.17 days, which has R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.461 ± 0.077R[SUB]J[/SUB] and M[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.805 ± 0.068M[SUB]J[/SUB]. WASP-93b orbits its F4 host star every 2.73 days and has R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.597 ± 0.077R[SUB]J[/SUB] and M[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.47 ± 0.029M[SUB]J[/SUB]. WASP-118b also has a hot host star (F6) and is moderately inflated, where R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.440 ± 0.036R[SUB]J[/SUB] and M[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.514 ± 0.020M[SUB]J[/SUB] and the planet has an orbital period of 4.05 days. They are bright targets (V = 13.18, 10.97 and 11.07 respectively) ideal for further characterisation work, particularly WASP-118b, which is being observed by K2 as part of campaign 8. The WASP-93 system has sufficient angular momentum to be tidally migrating outwards if the system is near spin-orbit alignment, which is divergent from the tidal behaviour of the majority of hot Jupiters discovered. [less ▲]

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See detailMonitoring of comets activity and composition with the TRAPPIST-North Telescope
Moulane, Youssef ULiege; Jehin, Emmanuel ULiege; Opitom, Cyrielle et al

Poster (2016, November 16)

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See detailTRAPPIST-Nord
Jehin, Emmanuel ULiege; Gillon, Michaël ULiege; Benkhaldoun, Zouhair et al

in Ciel (Le) (2016)

Un nouveau télescope a été inauguré à l’observatoire de L’Oukaimeden au Maroc en présence de chercheurs de l’université Cadi Ayyad de Marrakech et d’astronomes de l’université de Liège. Cet observatoire ... [more ▼]

Un nouveau télescope a été inauguré à l’observatoire de L’Oukaimeden au Maroc en présence de chercheurs de l’université Cadi Ayyad de Marrakech et d’astronomes de l’université de Liège. Cet observatoire se trouve dans l’Atlas marocain à 2 750 m d’altitude et bénéficie de plus de 250 nuits claires par an. Il abrite déjà plusieurs télescopes d’universités étrangères. Il s’agit de TRAPPIST-Nord, un télescope jumeau de celui qui a été installé en 2010 à l’observatoire de La Silla au Chili et qui a récemment fait parler de lui avec la découverte d’un des systèmes planétaires les plus proches contenant des planètes terrestres potentiellement habitables. [less ▲]

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