Publications of Dominique MORSOMME
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See detailListening to a dysphonic speaker in noise may impede children’s spoken language processing in a realistic classroom setting
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege; Kob, Malte et al

in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools (in press)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate children’s processing of dysphonic speech in a realistic classroom setting, under the influence of added classroom noise. Method: Normally developing 6 ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate children’s processing of dysphonic speech in a realistic classroom setting, under the influence of added classroom noise. Method: Normally developing 6-year-old primary-school children performed two listening tasks in their regular classrooms: a phoneme discrimination task to assess speech perception, and a sentence-picture matching task to assess listening comprehension. Speech stimuli were played back in either a normal or an impaired voice quality. Children performed the tasks in the presence of induced classroom noise at signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) between +2 and +9 dB. Results: Children’s performance in the phoneme discrimination task decreased significantly when the speaker’s voice was impaired. The effect of voice quality on sentence-picture matching depended on task demands: easy sentences were processed more accurately in the impaired-voice condition than in the normal-voice conditions. SNR effects are discussed in light of methodological constraints. Conclusions: Listening to a dysphonic teacher in a noisy classroom may impede children’s perception of speech, particularly when phonological discrimination is needed to disambiguate the speech input. Future research regarding the interaction of voice quality and task demands is necessary. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Acoustic Voice Quality Index version 03.01 in French and the Voice Handicap Index
Pommée, Timothy; Maryn, Youri; FINCK, Camille ULiege et al

in Journal of Voice (in press), 34(4), 646164610

Summary: Objectives. The Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI) version 03.01 is a tool for quantitative assessment of the overall severity of dysphonia. Its computation includes six acoustic parameters ... [more ▼]

Summary: Objectives. The Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI) version 03.01 is a tool for quantitative assessment of the overall severity of dysphonia. Its computation includes six acoustic parameters, which are all carried out by the freeware Praat. It is based on the recordings of a sustained vowel and a part of a text read aloud. The psychometric qualities of this tool have been confirmed by numerous publications in various languages, including French. However, studies investigating the correlation between tools for objective vocal assessment and voice-related quality of life show inconsistent results. Hence, the aim of this study was to contribute to the debate in measuring the correlations between the AVQI 03.01 score computed on French samples and the Voice Handicap Index. Methods. The data of 78 patients was used, collected during initial vocal assessment and stored in the ENT caseload of the University Hospital of Liège. We measured the Spearman rank-order correlation between the VHI total and sub-scores and the scores computed by the AVQI 03.01 on French samples. Eventually, we measured the correlation between the diagnostic decisions (“normophonia” vs “dysphonia”) of both tools using Cramer’s phi. Results. The Spearman correlation between the AVQI 03.01 score and the total VHI score, when controlling for age, is moderate (rs = .62, p < .0001). The correlations between the AVQI 03.01 score and the functional, emotional and physical sub-scores of the VHI are similarly moderate (rs = .643, .543 and .514, respectively, p <.0001). The correlation between the diagnostic decisions (“normophonia” vs “dysphonia”) by both tools is also moderate (φ = .52, p = .000). Conclusions. This study allows to keep things in perspective: even though AVQI 03.01 scores are moderately correlated with the VHI total and sub-scores, one has to keep in mind that they measure two different things. The AVQI 03.01 assesses the overall voice quality in terms of acoustic parameters, whereas the VHI assesses the multi-determined impact on the patient’s everyday life situations. Both results should thus be equally taken into account, as part of a comprehensive vocal assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailNoise and a speaker’s impaired voice quality disrupt spoken language processing in school-aged children: Evidence from performance and response time measures
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege; Kob, Malte et al

in Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research (2020)

Purpose: Our aim was to investigate isolated and combined effects of speech-shaped noise (SSN) and a speaker’s impaired voice quality on spoken language processing in first-grade children. Method: In ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Our aim was to investigate isolated and combined effects of speech-shaped noise (SSN) and a speaker’s impaired voice quality on spoken language processing in first-grade children. Method: In individual examinations, 53 typically developing children aged 5 to 6 years performed a speech perception task (phoneme discrimination) and a listening comprehension task (sentence-picture matching). Speech stimuli were randomly presented in a 2x2 factorial design with the factors noise (no added noise vs. SSN at 0 dB signal-to-noise ratio) and voice quality (normal voice vs. impaired voice). Outcome measures were task performance and response time (RT). Results: SSN and impaired voice quality significantly lowered children’s performance and increased RTs in the speech perception task, particularly when combined. Regarding listening comprehension, a significant interaction between noise and voice quality indicated that children’s performance was hindered by SSN when the speaker’s voice was impaired but not when it was normal. RTs in this task were unaffected by noise or voice quality. Conclusions: Results suggest that speech signal degradations caused by a speaker’s impaired voice and background noise generate more processing errors and increased listening effort in young school-aged children. This finding is vital for classroom listening and highlights the importance of ensuring teachers’ vocal health and adequate room acoustics. [less ▲]

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See detailJamais sans ma voix
Morsomme, Dominique ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2020)

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See detailDe l'usage de la paille en presbyphonie. Evidence-Based Practice en logopédie: Mise en pratique de la démarche dans le domaine des troubles de la voix
Morsomme, Dominique ULiege

Scientific conference (2020, January 10)

EBP : Vignettes cliniques en voix chez l’adulte Prof. Dominique Morsomme, logopédiste, Clinique Psychologique et Logopédique de Liège, Belgique La démarche d’Evidence-Based Practice dans le domaine de la ... [more ▼]

EBP : Vignettes cliniques en voix chez l’adulte Prof. Dominique Morsomme, logopédiste, Clinique Psychologique et Logopédique de Liège, Belgique La démarche d’Evidence-Based Practice dans le domaine de la prise en charge des troubles de la voix s’avère parfois complexe tant les interventions subissent l’influence de multiple facteurs. En effet, l’application d'une même technique peut varier d’un vocologiste à l’autre, d'un patient à l’autre, d’un environnement à l’autre et ainsi influer le résultat final. Nous présentons une capsule vidéo parmi cinq. Cette série a pour objectif d'aider le clinicien à accomplir sa démarche EBP en clinique journalière. La présentation traitera de l’usage et de l'efficacité d’exercices de constriction du tractus vocal dans la rééducation d'un patient dysphonique. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of noise and impaired voice quality on spoken language processing in school-aged children: Preliminary results of a systematic review
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Remacle, Angélique ULiege; Durieux, Nancy ULiege et al

Poster (2020, January 10)

At school, children often face challenging listening conditions due to high noise levels or because they are exposed to dysphonic speakers. To date, no comprehensive review has evaluated how this might ... [more ▼]

At school, children often face challenging listening conditions due to high noise levels or because they are exposed to dysphonic speakers. To date, no comprehensive review has evaluated how this might affect spoken language processing (SLP). Our aim was to systematically review the literature on the effects of noise and/or impaired voice quality on regular school-aged children's SLP. Eligibility was restricted to studies that assessed 6-18 year-old children’s performance and response times in listening tasks presented in noise and/or an impaired voice quality. We searched Medline/Ovid, PsycINFO/Ovid, Eric/Ovid, and Scopus up to August 2018. Risk of bias was determined using an adapted version of the NIH Quality Assessment Tool for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies. We classified and discussed findings in the light of three SLP components: speech perception, listening comprehension, and auditory working memory. We identified 24 eligible studies on the effect of noise (n=14), impaired voice (n=8), and the combination of noise and impaired voice (n=2). Sixteen of these studies were evaluated to be of good quality, eight of fair quality. For each SLP component, there was evidence for the disruptive effect of either noise or impaired voice on task performance or response times. However, there was no indication of an interaction between noise and impaired voice. Results from our systematic review suggest that acoustic degradations may impede children’s speech perception, comprehension of spoken language, and ability to retain speech-encoded information. This has important implications for the educational setting and highlights the need for improved listening conditions in learning spaces. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat did you say? Children’s spoken language processing in noise and speaker’s poor voice
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege; Kob, Malte et al

Conference (2019, December 10)

The rational of this study was to assess separate and combined effects of background noise and speaker’s impaired voice quality (i.e. dysphonia) on children’s spoken language processing. Fifty-three 5-6 ... [more ▼]

The rational of this study was to assess separate and combined effects of background noise and speaker’s impaired voice quality (i.e. dysphonia) on children’s spoken language processing. Fifty-three 5-6 year-old children individually performed a speech perception task and a listening comprehension task in a 2x2 factorial design with the factors noise (no noise / noise at 0 dB signal-to-noise ratio) and voice quality (normophonic speaker/dysphonic speaker). We measured children’s task performance and response times (RT) in these tasks. Noise and impaired voice significantly lowered performance and prolonged RT in speech perception, especially when combined. For listening comprehension, we found a significant interaction between noise and voice quality on task performance: Noise lowered performance, but only in the case of the dysphonic voice. Results highlight that noise and impaired voice may negatively affect children’s spoken language processing in different processing areas, with the effect being most pronounced when the two factors occur together. This has relevance for the educational setting, because classrooms are typically noisy and there is a high prevalence of voice problems among teachers. [less ▲]

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See detailEntretenir sa voix
Morsomme, Dominique ULiege

Scientific conference (2019, December 04)

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See detailVocal beauty: a mediating variable in the negative stereotyping of dysphonic speakers
Verduyckt, Ingrid; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege

in Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology (2019)

Context: A range of studies have consistently shown that listeners associate negative psychosocial characteristics to speakers with dysphonia. The reasons why have not formerly been explored. A better ... [more ▼]

Context: A range of studies have consistently shown that listeners associate negative psychosocial characteristics to speakers with dysphonia. The reasons why have not formerly been explored. A better understanding of the mechanisms behind this negative stereotype could help to develop attitude- changing measures towards voice disorders. Aim: We want to explore if the negative psychosocial stereotype linked to dysphonia is due to dys- phonia’s negative impact on perceived vocal beauty. Methods: A group of naïve listeners was asked to listen to female voice samples with varying degrees of dysphonia according to the Grade (G) of the GRBAS scale, and then to rate the perceived degree of vocal beauty for each voice on a visual analogue scale. They were also asked to infer personal charac- teristics of each speaker on a set of 21 Bipolar semantic scales. Results: Mediation analyses showed that G significantly and negatively predicts perceptions of vocal beauty (p < .001) and that vocal beauty in its turn was significantly and positively predicting inferences of negative psychosocial characteristics in the speakers (p<.001). When vocal beauty was partialled out, the negative impact of G was diminished or even cancelled. Conclusion: Our results show that in female speakers, the negative impact of dysphonia on the attri- bution of speakers’ personal characteristic is explained by the negative impact of dysphonia on per- ceived vocal beauty. Our results support the hypothesis that the beauty stereotype underlies the negative biases existing towards dysphonic speakers. We suggest that clinicians should be aware of this mechanism when promoting awareness about dysphonia. [less ▲]

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See detailChildren’s perception of degraded speech at normal vs. fast speech rate
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege; Kob, Malte et al

in Ochmann, Martin (Ed.) Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, integrating 4th EAA Euroregio 2019 (2019, September 12)

This study investigated the effect of degraded listening conditions and speech rate on children’s answer accuracy and response time in a speech perception task. Fifty-three normally-developing children ... [more ▼]

This study investigated the effect of degraded listening conditions and speech rate on children’s answer accuracy and response time in a speech perception task. Fifty-three normally-developing children (aged 5-6 years) listened to 72 pseudo-word pairs presented at two different speech rates (normal and fast) and four different listening conditions (normal voice in silence [control], dysphonic voice in silence, normal voice in speech-shaped noise (SSN) at 0 dBA SNR, and dysphonic voice in SSN at 0 dBA SNR). The participants had to decide whether the pseudo-words were the same (e.g. /filam/ - /filam/) or different (e.g. /mafin/ - /nafin/). For either speech rate, degraded listening conditions were found to significantly decrease answer accuracy. Regarding response time, speech rate interacted with listening condition: At fast as opposed to normal speech rate, children responded slower to normal voice in SSN but faster to the three other listening conditions. Our findings suggest that speech signal degradations may disrupt children’s speech perception even at normal speed. Speech rate might influence the extent of listening effort associated with adverse listening conditions. A good quality and adequate transmission of the speech signal may help children to listen effectively. [less ▲]

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See detailImitating dysphonic Voice: A suitable Technique to create Speech Stimuli for Spoken Language Processing Tasks?
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Remacle, Angélique ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege

in Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology (2019)

The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of imitated dysphonic voice samples for their application in listening tasks investigating the impact of speakers’ voice quality on spoken language ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of imitated dysphonic voice samples for their application in listening tasks investigating the impact of speakers’ voice quality on spoken language processing. A female voice expert recorded speech samples (sustained vowels and connected speech) in her normal voice and while imitating a dysphonic voice. Voice characteristics, authenticity, and consistency of the two voice qualities were evaluated by means of acoustic measurements (Acoustic Voice Quality Index [AVQI], Jitter, Shimmer, Harmonics-to-Noise Ratio [HNR]) and perceptual evaluation (GRBAS scale, consistency, and authenticity rated by five Speech-Language-Pathologists). Based on acoustic and perceptual assessments, the degree of voice impairment for the imitated dysphonic voice was found to be moderate to severe. Roughness and asthenia were the predominant perceptual features. The perceptual rating indicated a high consistency and acceptable authenticity of the imitated dysphonic voice. Results suggest that an imitation of dysphonic voice quality may closely resemble the voice characteristics typically found in dysphonic patients. The voice samples validated here shall be applied in future listening tasks and may promote our understanding of how dysphonic speech is processed. [less ▲]

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See detailCan dysphonia be mimicked authentically? An acoustic and perceptual evaluation of imitated dysphonic speech samples
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Remacle, Angélique ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege

Conference (2019, August 28)

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a healthy speaker can authentically imitate dysphonia. Mimicked dysphonic speech samples were assessed acoustically and perceptually. Evaluation was ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a healthy speaker can authentically imitate dysphonia. Mimicked dysphonic speech samples were assessed acoustically and perceptually. Evaluation was based on recordings of sustained vowels and connected speech produced by a female voice therapist. The speaker first used her normal voice and then mimicked a dysphonic voice. Acoustic assessment was performed with Praat (AVQI, Jitter, Shimmer, and HNR). Perceptual assessment was conducted by five Speech Language Pathologists. After listening to the speaker’s normophonic and mimicked dysphonic samples, they performed GRBAS ratings as well as authenticity and consistency ratings using a four-point scale. Results showed a moderate to severe degree of voice impairment for the mimicked dysphonic voice, with an AVQI score of 6.8. The mimicked dysphonic voice was predominantly perceived as rough (Median = 3) and asthenic (Median = 3). Authenticity and consistency were rated as acceptable and high respectively. This indicates that the speaker’s imitation of dysphonic voice was realistic and that she successfully maintained the same voice quality throughout the recording. Regarding the applications, we argue that imitation of dysphonic voice performed by a voice expert may be a useful method for investigating the effects of dysphonic voice on listeners’ spoken language processing. Speech samples validated in this study shall be used for future listening experiments and may improve our understanding of how speakers’ voice quality affects the listening experience. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of the Acoustic Voice Quality Index version 03.01 in the French language
Pommée, Timothy; Maryn, Youri; FINCK, Camille ULiege et al

Poster (2019, August 19)

Summary: Objectives. The Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI) version 03.01 is a tool for quantitative assessment of the overall severity of dysphonia. Its computation includes six acoustic parameters ... [more ▼]

Summary: Objectives. The Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI) version 03.01 is a tool for quantitative assessment of the overall severity of dysphonia. Its computation includes six acoustic parameters, which are all carried out using the freeware Praat. It is based on the recordings of a sustained vowel and a part of a text read aloud. In order to obtain a time balance between the sustained vowel and the continuous speech, Barsties and Maryn (2015) have found that — for the Dutch sample — 34 syllables have to be read aloud. The aim of this preliminary study was to determine how many syllables of a commonly used text in the French-speaking part of Belgium should be used to reach the same time balance. Methods. In order to identify the optimal part of the text to be taken into account for the AVQI’s computation, we first looked for the phonemic contents of different extracts in comparison to the phonemic frequencies in the French language. We then confirmed our choice on a larger sample from the database of the University Hospital of Liège (n=162). Therefore, we manually measured the duration of each recording’s concatenated voiced segments. The descriptive data of these lengths was then used to confirm the optimal length of the text extract to be used. This extract allows to obtain a time balance of the running speech sample with the central three seconds of the sustained vowel. Results. 27 syllables were found to be the most appropriate duration of the text to be read aloud, in order to balance out the time analysed for both the sustained vowel and the continuous speech. The median duration of the concatenated voiced segments for the 162 recordings is three seconds (interquartile range: 0.76 seconds), which is well-balanced with the three seconds of the sustained vowel. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Acoustic Voice Quality Index version 03.01 in French and the Voice Handicap Index
Pommée, Timothy; Maryn, Youri; FINCK, Camille ULiege et al

Poster (2019, August 19)

Summary: Objectives. The Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI) version 03.01 is a tool for quantitative assessment of the overall severity of dysphonia. Its computation includes six acoustic parameters ... [more ▼]

Summary: Objectives. The Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI) version 03.01 is a tool for quantitative assessment of the overall severity of dysphonia. Its computation includes six acoustic parameters, which are all carried out by the freeware Praat. It is based on the recordings of a sustained vowel and a part of a text read aloud. The psychometric qualities of this tool have been confirmed by numerous publications in various languages, including French. However, studies investigating the correlation between tools for objective vocal assessment and voice-related quality of life show inconsistent results. Hence, the aim of this study was to contribute to the debate in measuring the correlations between the AVQI 03.01 score computed on French samples and the Voice Handicap Index. Methods. The data of 78 patients was used, collected during initial vocal assessment and stored in the ENT caseload of the University Hospital of Liège. We measured the Spearman rank-order correlation between the VHI total and sub-scores and the scores computed by the AVQI 03.01 on French samples. Eventually, we measured the correlation between the diagnostic decisions (“normophonia” vs “dysphonia”) of both tools using Cramer’s phi. Results. The Spearman correlation between the AVQI 03.01 score and the total VHI score, when controlling for age, is moderate (rs = .62, p < .0001). The correlations between the AVQI 03.01 score and the functional, emotional and physical sub-scores of the VHI are similarly moderate (rs = .643, .543 and .514, respectively, p <.0001). The correlation between the diagnostic decisions (“normophonia” vs “dysphonia”) by both tools is also moderate (φ = .52, p = .000). Conclusions. This study allows to keep things in perspective: even though AVQI 03.01 scores are moderately correlated with the VHI total and sub-scores, one has to keep in mind that they measure two different things. The AVQI 03.01 assesses the overall voice quality in terms of acoustic parameters, whereas the VHI assesses the multi-determined impact on the patient’s everyday life situations. Both results should thus be equally taken into account, as part of a comprehensive vocal assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of a virtual environment for learning vocal skills
Remacle, Angélique ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege

Conference (2019, June 25)

In health care, there is incredible potential for new technologies (AR, VR…) in both the medical and psychological fields. For their application as diagnostic and treatment tools, scientific validation is ... [more ▼]

In health care, there is incredible potential for new technologies (AR, VR…) in both the medical and psychological fields. For their application as diagnostic and treatment tools, scientific validation is essential with respect to evidence-based practice. The scientific approach is 1) to assess the benefits of such new technologies over other existing methods, and 2) to detect potential adverse effects (e.g. cybersickness for VR technologies). This presentation focuses on the validation of a VR environment within the field of speech therapy, which is designed for teachers’ voice care. During the training sessions, the application is used to help teachers acquire appropriate vocal skills and practice these skills in a simulated teaching context. [less ▲]

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See detailTout ce que vous avez toujours voulu savoir sur les immobilités cordales sans jamais oser le demander !
FINCK, Camille ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege

Scientific conference (2019, May 16)

En clinique journalière, nous rencontrons fréquemment des patients souffrant de troubles de la mobilité laryngée. La mise au point de ce type de troubles s’avère plus complexe qu’il n’y paraît, ce qui ... [more ▼]

En clinique journalière, nous rencontrons fréquemment des patients souffrant de troubles de la mobilité laryngée. La mise au point de ce type de troubles s’avère plus complexe qu’il n’y paraît, ce qui peut compliquer le choix du traitement qui en découle. Les troubles de la mobilité laryngée peuvent être uni- ou bilatéraux. Leurs origines sont diverses. En effet, les atteintes peuvent être neurogènes, mécaniques, ou encore musculaires et articulaires. Les plaintes des patients varient en fonction du type d’immobilité, de l’étiologie de celle-ci, du temps écoulé depuis l’installation de la pathologie, du sujet lui-même et du contexte communicationnel dans lequel il évolue tant sur le plan professionnel que privé. Les plaintes concernent la qualité vocale et/ou des difficultés respiratoires et/ou des troubles de la déglutition. Les solutions thérapeutiques sont diverses et varient en fonction de l’étiologie, du pronostic, de l’importance du ou des troubles fonctionnels touchant les 3 fonctions laryngées (déglutition, phonation, respiration) : de l’abstention thérapeutique, à l’expectative armée et à la rééducation orthophonique, aux gestes chirurgicaux réputés plus invasifs mais qui doivent pouvoir être proposés rapidement (médialisations par voie externe ou injection, injections de toxine botulinique, cordotomies laser, réinnervation sélective ou non sélective, trachéotomie) L’atelier débutera par un récapitulatif anatomophysiologique de l’innervation et des fonctions laryngées. Les pathologies principales seront ensuite décrites (atteintes neurogènes uni- et bilatérales, atteinte du nerf laryngé supérieur, ankyloses articulaires). Ensuite, nous présenterons quatre vignettes cliniques détaillées incluant l’anamnèse, le mode d’installation du trouble, les vidéo-laryngo-stroboscopies, les échantillons sonores de lecture de texte, les résultats aux diverses mesures du bilan vocal à savoir fréquence fondamentale, niveau de pression sonore, phonétogramme, niveaux de pression sous glottique estimée, et temps maximum phonatoire ainsi que les scores à l’échelle d’auto- évaluation de l’impact psycho-social du trouble. Après chaque vignette, la parole sera donnée au public afin de clarifier l’idée qu’il se fait du diagnostic, la manière dont il interprète la plainte à la lumière des divers résultats, le pronostic de récupération qu’il émet ou non, les types d’examen(s) complémentaire(s) qu’il choisit ainsi que les arguments qu’il développe pour étayer ses choix thérapeutiques. Nous terminerons l’atelier par une discussion plus théorique sur les traitements proposés à l’heure actuelle, à la lumière des récentes publications sur le sujet. Nous porterons une attention particulière aux séances de rééducation logopédique : Quand et dans quels cas les propose-t-on ? Quelle efficacité pouvons-nous en attendre ? [less ▲]

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See detailL'analyse prosodique: outil d'objectivation de l'efficacité thérapeutique dans le cadre de la féminisation vocale?
Blanckaert, Ellen ULiege; Mertens, Piet; Pillot-Loiseau, Claire et al

Poster (2019, May 15)

Objectifs Bien que l’intonation constitue une variable pertinente pour la perception de la féminité vocale (Hancock et al., 2014 ; Hillenbrand et al., 2009) force est d’admettre que cette composante ... [more ▼]

Objectifs Bien que l’intonation constitue une variable pertinente pour la perception de la féminité vocale (Hancock et al., 2014 ; Hillenbrand et al., 2009) force est d’admettre que cette composante prosodique est peu voire non abordée de manière objective lors de l’évaluation de l’efficacité thérapeutique. En effet, qu’il s’agisse du bilan vocal initial, d’évolution ou de fin de prise en charge, l’évaluation de la prosodie constitue un parent pauvre dont l’abord perceptif s’avère subjectif et non étayé. Notre objectif est, par conséquent, de recourir à un outil d’analyse automatique de la prosodie, sur base d’un modèle perceptif, et de juger de la pertinence du profil prosodique ainsi obtenu pour objectiver l’efficacité thérapeutique d’une prise en charge en féminisation vocale. Matériel et méthode Notre étude de cas porte sur une femme transgenre dont la prosodie est régulièrement évaluée au fil de sa prise en charge pour féminisation vocale. Pour ce faire, nous recourons à des tâches de lecture, langage semi-spontané et spontané et les analysons à l’aide de Praat (Boersma et Weenink, 2018) et Prosogram (Mertens, 2004) afin d’élaborer les profils prosodiques correspondants. Nous procédons ensuite à la comparaison des profils obtenus au fil de la rééducation ainsi que pré et post prise en charge. Résultats et discussion L’étude étant en cours, nous gageons que les données stylisées montreront des différences significatives entre le début, le décours et la fin de la prise en charge, à savoir : réduction du pourcentage de syllabes statiques, majoration de la trajectoire totale des variations intra- et inter-syllabiques, réduction de la proportion de phonation et allongement de la durée des noyaux vocaliques. Notre discussion portera sur la plus-value qu’apportent ces variables dans le cadre du bilan vocal (Dejonckere et al., 2001 ; Morsomme et Estienne, 2006). Conclusion L’intérêt de notre démarche est d’adjoindre simultanément au bilan vocal une dimension perceptive et une analyse objective de la prosodie. Le profil prosodique ainsi obtenu pourrait à terme contribuer à l’évaluation de l’efficacité thérapeutique de même qu’à la structuration de la prise en charge des personnes en réassignation de genre. L’analyse relevant d’une procédure automatique, cette démarche serait de surcroît aisément implémentable en clinique journalière. Cependant, dans la mesure où nous nous attendons à d’importantes variations inter-individuelles, nos résultats se devront d’être éprouvés auprès d’une plus vaste population. Références bibliographiques BOERSMA, P., & WEENINK, D. Praat : Doing phonetics by computer, version 6.0.43 [Computer program]. En ligne : http://www.praat.org ; 2018. DEJONCKERE, PH., BRADLEY, P., CLEMENTE P, CORNUT, G., CREVIER-BUCHMAN, L., FRIEDRICH, G., VAN DE HEYNING, P., REMACLE, M., & WOISARD, V. A basic protocol for functional assessment of voice pathology, especially for investigating the efficacy of (phonosurgical) treatments and evaluating new assessment techniques. Guideline elaborated by the Committee on Phoniatrics of the European Laryngological Society (ELS). European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology, 258, 2001, 77-82. HANCOCK, A., COLTON, L., & DOUGLAS, F., Intonation and gender perception : Applications for transgender speakers. Journal of Voice, Vol. 28, 2014, 203-209. HILLENBRAND, J.M., & CLARK, M.J., The role of F0 and formant frequencies in distinguishing the voices of men and women. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, Vol. 71, 2009, 1150-1166. MERTENS, P. Un outil pour la transcription de la prosodie dans les corpus oraux. Traitement automatique des langues, Vol. 45/2, 2004, 109-130. MORSOMME, D., & ESTIENNE, F., Le bilan de voix. In F., Estienne, Les bilans de langage et de voix, Masson, 2006. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen the most important working tool is impaired: dysphonia among teachers.
Morsomme, Dominique ULiege

Conference (2019, March 22)

Once graduated from University, teachers' vocal load will double upon the beginning of their career. Their training does not sufficiently prepare teachers for the vocal demands that come with long ... [more ▼]

Once graduated from University, teachers' vocal load will double upon the beginning of their career. Their training does not sufficiently prepare teachers for the vocal demands that come with long teaching hours at schools. The first three years of a teacher's career represent a critical period in terms of vocal resistance. Teachers face three challenges for which a powerful voice is essential: (1) management of the class, (2) transmission of knowledge, persuasiveness and (3) intelligibility in noisy environments. Nevertheless, teachers who develop voice disorders often hesitate to seek professional help. They might think that it is normal to have a hoarse voice at the end of a teaching week. They might even convince themselves that hoarseness is a sign of effective teaching practice. But untreated voice problems increase the risk of vocal fold lesions. Once a teacher is diagnosed with a voice disorder, we differentiate between vocal misuse and vocal overuse. In case of misuse, vocal motor behaviour will be analysed in order to understand the dysfunctional phonation patterns causing the problem. In case of overuse, the degree of the teacher's vocal resistance will be thoroughly analyzed. Guided by the speech-language pathologist / vocologist, the teacher explores his/her vocal capacity, recognizes its limits, and learns to use his precious tool in a healthy manner. [less ▲]

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See detailDe l'intérêt du profil prosodique dans le bilan vocal : aspects méthodologiques
Blanckaert, Ellen ULiege; Mertens, Piet; Pillot-Loiseau, Claire et al

Conference (2019, January 31)

Objectifs : Bien que l’évaluation de la prosodie soit abordée dans le cadre du bilan vocal, force est d’admettre qu’il s’agit d’une évaluation globale, basée sur la perception subjective du clinicien, en ... [more ▼]

Objectifs : Bien que l’évaluation de la prosodie soit abordée dans le cadre du bilan vocal, force est d’admettre qu’il s’agit d’une évaluation globale, basée sur la perception subjective du clinicien, en l’absence de tout étayage. Notre objectif est par conséquent d’aborder la prosodie de manière objective et de comparer les profils prosodiques obtenus à partir de différentes productions de parole continue (comptage, lecture, langage semi-spontané). Ceci afin de déterminer quelles tâches s’avèrent les plus pertinentes. A terme, ces dernières pourraient être intégrées à l’analyse du comportement vocal. Matériel et méthode : La méthodologie est abordée via l’étude d’un jeune adulte normophonique, non professionnel de la voix. Nous recourons à Praat et Prosogram afin d’élaborer le profil prosodique. Résultats et discussion : Nous constatons d’emblée que le profil prosodique est influencé par la nature des tâches produites en termes de variabilité mélodique. Ainsi, la tâche de comptage induit uniquement des glissandi descendants alors que les autres tâches génèrent des glissandi diversifiés (ascendants et descendants). Quant à la trajectoire totale intra- et inter-syllabique, elle s’avère supérieure pour la lecture d’un dialogue (17.1 demi-tons / seconde), le récit semi-spontané (13.6) et la lecture de phrases (12.5) comparativement à la tâche de comptage (5.8). Conclusion : L’intérêt de notre démarche est d’accroître l’écologie du bilan vocal tout en lui adjoignant une analyse perceptive de la prosodie. A terme, le profil prosodique pourrait également contribuer à l’évaluation de l’efficacité thérapeutique et s’avérer particulièrement pertinents lors de l’évaluation et de la prise en charge des patients en réassignation de genre. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effect of impaired speaker’s voice and noise on children's spoken language processing
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege; Kob, Malte et al

Poster (2019, January 11)

Background – Past studies indicate that listening to either impaired voice or against background noise may compromise children’s ability to process spoken language. However, the interaction of both ... [more ▼]

Background – Past studies indicate that listening to either impaired voice or against background noise may compromise children’s ability to process spoken language. However, the interaction of both factors remains largely unknown. Aim – The aim of this study was to investigate single and combined effects of impaired speaker’s voice and noise on spoken language processing in children (aged 5-6). Methods – First-grade primary school children (n = 53) individually performed two listening tasks: A Minimal-Pair Discrimination task assessing speech perception and a Sentence-Picture Matching Task assessing listening comprehension. Speech stimuli were presented in four conditions: (C1) normal voice and no noise, (C2) imitated impaired voice and no noise, (C3) normal voice and speech-shaped noise, and (C4) imitated impaired voice and speech-shaped noise. Task score per condition was calculated as measure of performance. Results – Irrespective of task, children performed significantly lower when stimuli were presented in a combination of impaired voice and noise (C4) as compared to any other condition. The presence of only one adverse factor (C2 or C3) lowered performance in the speech perception task but not the listening comprehension task. Discussion – Results suggest that when processing speech, young school-aged children are highly vulnerable to the combined effect of impaired speaker’s voice and noise. This could be due to increased auditory masking and reduced cognitive capacity available for linguistic processing. With only a single adverse factor present, children seem able to still use semantic or syntactic context cues for correct interpretation. However, performance drops when such cues are unavailable. Conclusion – Favorable listening conditions may be crucial for children’s processing of spoken language and positive learning outcomes. Particularly in the educational context, where listening is affected by voice quality and noise, measures should be taken to enhance the transmission of the speech signal and reduce noise. [less ▲]

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