Publications of Arnaud D'Argembeau
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See detailThe impact of age on the temporal compression of daily life events in episodic memory
Folville, Adrien ULiege; Jeunehomme, Olivier ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege et al

in Psychology and Aging (in press)

While age differences in episodic memory are well documented, the impact of age on the structure of memories for real-world events has not been investigated in detail. Recent research has shown that the ... [more ▼]

While age differences in episodic memory are well documented, the impact of age on the structure of memories for real-world events has not been investigated in detail. Recent research has shown that the continuous flow of information that constitutes daily life events is compressed in episodic memory, such that the time needed to mentally replay an event is shorter than the actual event duration. To examine whether this process of temporal compression of prior experience in episodic memory is affected by aging, we asked young and older adults to engage in a series of events that simulated daily life activities while their experience was automatically recorded using a wearable camera. Subsequently, participants were asked to mentally replay these events in as much detail as possible and then to verbally report recalled contents and to rate the subjective qualities of their memories. Results revealed that the rates of temporal compression of events during mental replay were similar in young and older adults. In both age groups, rates of temporal compression were predicted by the density of recalled moments of prior experience per unit of time of the actual event duration. Interestingly, however, the number of recalled moments predicted the subjective vividness of memories in young but not in older adults. Taken together, these results suggest that the process of temporal compression of events in episodic memory is unaffected by age but that the subjective experience of memory vividness becomes less tied to recalled moments that represent the unfolding of events. [less ▲]

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See detailImagination and self-referential thinking
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege

in Abraham, A. (Ed.) The Cambrige handbook of the imagination (2020)

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See detailZooming in and out on one’s life: autobiographical representations at multiple time scales
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2020), 32(11), 2037-2055

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See detailEvent segmentation and the temporal compression of experience in episodic memory
Jeunehomme, Olivier ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege

in Psychological Research (2020), 84

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See detailDeciphering the Relationship between Objective and Subjective Aspects of Recollection in Healthy Aging
Folville, Adrien ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege

in Memory (2020), 28(3), 362-373

Although healthy aging has been related to a decline in recollection as indexed by objective measures, the subjective experience of recollection sometimes remains stable. To date, however, these age ... [more ▼]

Although healthy aging has been related to a decline in recollection as indexed by objective measures, the subjective experience of recollection sometimes remains stable. To date, however, these age-related differences have only been examined using aggregated data across trials. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between subjective and objective measures of recollection on a trial-by-trial basis to determine whether the magnitude of this relationship was similar in young and older adults. Young and older participants were presented with pictures that were associated with descriptive labels at encoding. At retrieval, they were cued with the labels and were asked to rate the vividness of their memory for the associated picture and to recall as many details of the picture as possible. On average, older adults assigned higher vividness ratings but recalled fewer episodic details than young adults. Mixed-effects modeling revealed that the relationship between subjective (vividness) and objective (number of recalled details) recollection across trials was stronger in young than in older participants. These findings provide evidence that older adults not only retrieve fewer episodic details but also rely on these details to a lesser extent than young adults for judging the subjective quality of their memories. [less ▲]

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See detailA gist orientation before retrieval impacts the objective content but not the subjective experience of episodic memory
Folville, Adrien ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege

in Consciousness and Cognition (2020)

A gist retrieval-orientation decreases one’s ability to remember objective details from past experiences. Here, we examined whether a gist retrieval-orientation manipulation can impact both the objective ... [more ▼]

A gist retrieval-orientation decreases one’s ability to remember objective details from past experiences. Here, we examined whether a gist retrieval-orientation manipulation can impact both the objective and subjective aspects of remembering. Young participants took part in two cued-recollection tasks in which they studied pictures associated with labels; at retrieval, from the labels, they evaluated the vividness of their memories of the corresponding pictures, and recalled picture details. Before retrieval, participants were submitted either to a gist or a control retrieval-orientation (one per task). Results revealed that the amount of recalled details was lower following the gist condition while vividness ratings did not differ between the two retrieval orientations. Critically, the amount of recalled details predicted the corresponding vividness ratings to a similar extent in the gist and control conditions, thus suggesting that recollected memory traces in the gist condition were still rich enough to be judged as subjectively vivid. [less ▲]

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See detailValidating ‘belief in occurrence’ for future autobiographical events.
Scoboria, Alan; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Ernst, Alexandra ULiege et al

in Psychology of Consciousness: Theory, Research, and Practice (2020), 7

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See detailAge-related differences in the neural correlates of vivid remembering
Folville, Adrien ULiege; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege; Delhaye, Emma ULiege et al

in NeuroImage (2020), 206

When recollecting events, older adults typically report similar memory vividness levels as young adults, while they actually retrieve fewer episodic details. This suggests that young and older adults use ... [more ▼]

When recollecting events, older adults typically report similar memory vividness levels as young adults, while they actually retrieve fewer episodic details. This suggests that young and older adults use episodic details differently to calibrate their vividness judgements. Capitalizing on the idea that remembering reactivates brain regions that initially processed details at encoding, the current fMRI study sought to examine these age-related changes in the basis of vivid recollection. At encoding, young and older adults saw pictures associated with labels and these labels were then used as retrieval cues for recalling the associated pictures and making memory vividness judgments. Results showed that highly vivid memories were associated with greater activity in the precuneus in young than older adults. Furthermore, the direct comparison between encoding and retrieval patterns of activity using Representational Similarity Analyses revealed stronger item-specific reactivation in the posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex in young than older adults. Taken together, these results provide new evidence that aging is associated with reduced reinstatement of activity in brain regions that processed the encoding of complex stimuli, but older individuals judge these impoverished memory representations as subjectively vivid. [less ▲]

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See detailDrowsiness or mind-wandering? Fluctuations in ocular parameters during attentional lapses
Stawarczyk, David ULiege; François, Clémentine; Wertz, Jérôme et al

in Biological Psychology (2020), 156

Two independent lines of evidence suggest that drowsiness and mind-wandering share common neurocognitive processes indexed by ocular parameters (e.g., eyeblink frequency and pupil dynamics). Mind ... [more ▼]

Two independent lines of evidence suggest that drowsiness and mind-wandering share common neurocognitive processes indexed by ocular parameters (e.g., eyeblink frequency and pupil dynamics). Mind-wandering and drowsiness frequently co-occur, however, such that it remains unclear whether observed oculometric variations are related to mind-wandering, drowsiness, or a mix of both. To address this issue, we assessed fluctuations in mind-wandering and sleepiness during a sustained attention task while ocular parameters were recorded. Results showed that oculometric variations during mind-wandering were fully explained by increased sleepiness. However, mind-wandering and sleepiness had additive deleterious effects on performance that were not fully explained by ocular parameters. These findings suggest that oculometric variations during task performance reflect increased drowsiness rather than processes specifically involved in mind-wandering, and that the neurocognitive processes indexed by oculometric parameters (e.g., regulatory processes of the locus coeruleus norepinephrine system) do not fully explain how mind-wandering and sleepiness cause attentional lapses. [less ▲]

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See detailAutobiographical memory and future thinking
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege

Conference (2019, November 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (1 ULiège)
See detailA gist orientation before retrieval impacts the objective content but not the subjective experience of recollection
Folville, Adrien ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege

Poster (2019, October 03)

Gist retrieval-orientation manipulations can experimentally decrease one’s ability to recollect objective details of past experience (Rudoy et al., 2009). Recent evidence further suggest that the quantity ... [more ▼]

Gist retrieval-orientation manipulations can experimentally decrease one’s ability to recollect objective details of past experience (Rudoy et al., 2009). Recent evidence further suggest that the quantity of recollected details strongly predicts the associated subjective memory experience (i.e., vividness) (Folville et al., 2019). Whether a gist retrieval-orientation manipulation can hinder both the objective and subjective aspects of episodic recollection remains unknown, however. To examine this question, young participants were tested in two experimental sessions. During each session, they took part to a cued-recollection task in which they studied pictures associated with descriptive labels. Before retrieval, participants were submitted either to a gist or a control retrieval-orientation (one per session). At retrieval, they were presented with the labels alone and they were asked to evaluate the subjective vividness of their memories of the pictures and to recall as many pictures details as they could. Results revealed that the amount of recalled details was lower following the gist than the control condition while the rates of vividness did not differ between the two manipulations. Critically, the amount of recalled details predicted the corresponding vividness ratings on a trial-by-trial basis and the magnitude of this relationship was similar in the gist and control conditions. These findings show that gist-retrieval-orientation manipulations can experimentally decrease the amount of retrieved episodic details but that recollected memory traces are still rich enough to be judged as subjectively vivid. [less ▲]

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See detailMémoire autobiographique et projection dans le futur
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege

Conference (2019, September 28)

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (3 ULiège)
See detailImagining one’s personal future: mechanisms of episodic future thinking
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege

Scientific conference (2019, July 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (1 ULiège)
See detailThe impact of age on the temporal compression of daily-life events in episodic memory
Folville, Adrien ULiege; Jeunehomme, Olivier ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege et al

Poster (2019, June 06)

Recent evidence suggests that the dynamic flow of information that constitutes daily-life events is remembered as moments of prior experience separated by temporal gaps. To date, however, how aging ... [more ▼]

Recent evidence suggests that the dynamic flow of information that constitutes daily-life events is remembered as moments of prior experience separated by temporal gaps. To date, however, how aging impacts this process of compression of past experience in episodic memory has received little attention. To examine this question, young and older adults incidentally engaged in daily-life activities while wearing a wearable camera. Subsequently, participants were cued with pictures taken by the wearable camera and were asked to mentally relive corresponding events in as much detail as possible. Results revealed that rates of temporal compression of events when remembering were similar in young and older adults. In both groups, these rates of compression were higher when remembering goal-directed actions compared to spatial displacements. Furthermore, the amount of detail within recalled moments did not differ between age-groups. Taken together, these results support the view that episodic memories represent the unfolding of events as compressed short-time slices of past experience. Our findings also suggest that these mechanisms of compression remain stable with increasing age which highlights the importance of using ecological approaches that capture the complexity of real-life events to examine age-related changes in episodic memory. [less ▲]

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See detailMémoire et représentation de soi: du passé au futur.
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege

Conference (2019, May 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 ULiège)
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See detailDefining ourselves: Past and future self-defining events increase the accessibility of psychological self-concepts
Garcia Jimenez, Claudia ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege

Poster (2019, May 14)

Recent research suggests that the retrieval of self-defining memories (SDMs)—the memories of the most important events in our lives—influences an individual’s current sense of self and identity, notably ... [more ▼]

Recent research suggests that the retrieval of self-defining memories (SDMs)—the memories of the most important events in our lives—influences an individual’s current sense of self and identity, notably by increasing the tendency to conceptualize oneself in relation to psychological traits. In addition to being supported by such memories, our current sense of self may also be nourished by the anticipation of meaningful future events—referred to as self-defining future projections (SDFPs). To test this hypothesis, this study examined how SDFPs and SDMs modulate the current sense of self and identity. Three groups of participants wrote a description of a SDFP, a SDM or a non-self-related control topic, following which they had to provide ten stable aspects of their identity in the form of statements beginning with "I am". Participants engaging in SDFP and SDM descriptions generated significantly more psychological self-statements than those in the control condition. These results suggest that the act of projecting oneself into meaningful future events modulates the current sense of self to the same extent as autobiographical memory retrieval, by increasing the accessibility of psychological, trait-like self-conceptions. [less ▲]

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See detailOlder adults do not always rely on the amount of episodic details when judging the subjective quality of their memories
Folville, Adrien ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege

Poster (2019, May 14)

Although healthy aging is related to a decline in recollection asindexed by objective measures, the subjective experience of recollection remains stable.To date, however, studies have only examined these ... [more ▼]

Although healthy aging is related to a decline in recollection asindexed by objective measures, the subjective experience of recollection remains stable.To date, however, studies have only examined these age-related effects using aggregated data across trials, such that the relationship between subjective and objective measures of recollection on a trial-by-trial basis remains unknown. To address this question, young and older adults performed a cued recollection task of pictures that wereassociated with descriptive labels at encoding. At retrieval, participants were cued with the labels and were asked to rate the vividness of their memory of the picture and to recall as many details of the picture as they could.Multilevelanalyses revealed that, across trials, the relationship between subjective (vividness) and objective (free recall) recollection was stronger in young than inolder participants.However, when requested to recall the content of the picture before assessing vividness, older adults calibrated their subjective judgements on the amount of retrieved details to the same extent as young adults. These results provide evidence that older adults not only retrieve fewer episodic details but also rely on these details to a lesser extent than young adults for judging the subjective quality of their memories. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (5 ULiège)
See detailThe impact of age on the temporal compression of daily-life events in episodic memory
Folville, Adrien ULiege; Jeunehomme, Olivier ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege et al

Poster (2019, May 14)

Recent evidence suggests that the dynamic flow of information that constitutes daily-life events is remembered as moments of prior experience separated by temporal gaps. To date, however, how aging ... [more ▼]

Recent evidence suggests that the dynamic flow of information that constitutes daily-life events is remembered as moments of prior experience separated by temporal gaps. To date, however, how aging impacts this process of compression of past experience in episodic memory has received little attention. To examine this question, young and older adults incidentally engaged in daily-life activities while wearing a camera. Subsequently, participants were cued with pictures taken by the wearable camera and were asked to mentally relive corresponding events in as much detail as possible. Results revealed that rates of temporal compression of events when remembering were similar in young and older adults. In both groups, these rates of compression were higher when remembering goal-directed actions compared to spatial displacements. Furthermore, the amount of detail within recalled moments did not differ between age-groups. Taken together, these results support the view that episodic memories represent the unfolding of events as compressed short-time slices of past experience. Our findings also suggest that these mechanisms of compression remain stable with increasing age which highlights the importance of using ecological approaches that capture the complexity of real-life events to examine age-related changes in episodic memory. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (8 ULiège)
See detailInfluence of self-relevance on memory for future event simulations.
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege

Conference (2019, March 08)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 ULiège)