Publications of Bernard Rentier
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See detailAcute experimental glomerulonephritis induced by the glomerular deposition of circulating polymerid IgA-Concanavalin A complexes
Davin, Jean-Claude ULiege; Dechenne, Charles ULiege; Lombet, Jacques ULiege et al

in Virchows Archiv. A: Pathological Anatomy and Histopathology (1989), 415(1), 7-20

The perfusion of polymeric or secretory IgA-Concanavalin A complexes into the aorta of rats led to a mannose-dependent binding of both IgA and lectin to the glomerular capillary wall, as shown by double ... [more ▼]

The perfusion of polymeric or secretory IgA-Concanavalin A complexes into the aorta of rats led to a mannose-dependent binding of both IgA and lectin to the glomerular capillary wall, as shown by double immunolocalization experiments, by quantitative analysis of the amount of radiolabeled complexes bound per g of kidney, and by blocking experiments with the corresponding carbohydrate. Rats injected with amounts of those complexes as low as 500 ?g developed, one hour later, a focal and segmental proliferative glomerulonephritis characterized by the deposition of injected complexes and of rat C3 and rat fibrin/ fibrinogen in most glomeruli ; focal thrombosis and small areas of necrosis in 10 to 15% of glomeruli, confined to the periphery of a single lobule of the tuft and segmental infiltration of these glomeruli by polymorphonuclear leucocytes and platelets. At the same time, many mesangial cells exhibited a hyperactive appearance, and red blood cells were noted in tubular lumens. In contrast, rats similarly injected with either monomeric IgA-ConA complexes, multimeric or secretory IgA-peanut agglutinin complexes or polymeric or monomeric IgA aggregates of comparable apparent molecular weight did not develop obvious glomerular lesions within one hour. The data indicate that preformed polymeric IgA-ConA complexes can specifically bind to glomerular structures in vivo and trigger acute glomerular lesions locally, analogous to those observed in some glomerular diseases associated with a cryoglobulinemia. [less ▲]

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See detailVaricella-zoster virus infection of adult rat sensory neurons in vitro.
Merville-Louis, M. P.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULiege; Delree, P. et al

in Journal of Virology (1989), 63(7), 3155-60

We report here an in vitro model of neuronal infection by varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Such a model has been achieved by using dissociated adult rat dorsal root ganglia cells infected by cocultivation ... [more ▼]

We report here an in vitro model of neuronal infection by varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Such a model has been achieved by using dissociated adult rat dorsal root ganglia cells infected by cocultivation with VZV-infected MRC5 cells or with cell-free virus. Indirect VZV immunolabeling, in situ hybridization, and neuron-specific immunolabeling demonstrated that VZV infection occurred selectively in neurons. VZV-specific immunolabeling detected a few neurons 1 or 2 days postinfection but not later. Genome detection using cloned VZV DNA probes revealed a hybridization signal primarily with RNA. Within 1 to 6 days postinfection, a progressive increase of VZV-specific hybridization was observed in up to 50% of the neurons. RNAs corresponding to immediate-early, early, and late genes were found, and transcripts of immediate-early gene 63 were particularly abundant. [less ▲]

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See detailPreparation of reproducible alkaline phosphatase-antibody conjugates for enzyme immunoassay using a heterobifunctional linking agent
Jeanson, Antoinette; Cloes, Jean-Michel; Bouchet, Mireille et al

in Analytical Biochemistry (1988), 172(2), 392-396

Conjugates of alkaline phosphatase (AP) and mouse monoclonal immunoglobulins G (IgG) were prepared by means of the heterobifunctional linker, N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate. The efficiency ... [more ▼]

Conjugates of alkaline phosphatase (AP) and mouse monoclonal immunoglobulins G (IgG) were prepared by means of the heterobifunctional linker, N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate. The efficiency of such conjugates can be improved by optimizing the degree of substitution of IgG and AP. We have determined conditions yielding better performing conjugates than those synthesized by methods described previously. Moreover, the results obtained with the technique presented here are quite reproducible with all four monoclonal antibodies tested. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of conjugation procedures for the preparation of monoclonal antibody-enzyme conjugates
Jeanson, Antoinette; Cloes, Jean-Michel; Bouchet, Mireille et al

in Journal of Immunological Methods (1988), 111(2), 261-270

Four monoclonal antibodies belonging to different subclasses and with differing isoelectric points were coupled to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) using various conjugation ... [more ▼]

Four monoclonal antibodies belonging to different subclasses and with differing isoelectric points were coupled to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) using various conjugation procedures. The conjugates were tested by enzyme immunoassay and their efficiency was characterized by the antibody and enzyme concentrations needed to obtain an arbitrary OD value. The suitability of antibody for conjugation through NH2 groups was tested by fluorodinitrobenzene (FDNB). HRP conjugates were produced by two variants of the sodium periodate procedure and two variants of the glutaraldehyde method, as well as by the heterobifunctional linker N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)pro-pionate (SPDP). Two of the four antibodies were coupled by a third variant of the periodate method, through their carbohydrate moieties. The periodate-mediated conjugations, using sugar moieties on the enzyme, provided the most efficient HRP conjugates, regardless of the antibody subclass or isoelectric point. The glutaraldehyde procedures consistently gave the worst results. AP conjugates were prepared using the same methods. The most efficient and reproducible AP conjugates with all four monoclonal antibodies were obtained using the SPDP procedure. The efficiency of the other methods differed from one antibody to another. [less ▲]

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See detailElucidation of non-parallel EIA curves
François-Gérard, C.; Gérard, Paul ULiege; Rentier, Bernard ULiege

in Journal of Immunological Methods (1988), 111(1), 59-65

Quantitative determinations by EIA can be only obtained by reverse regression when linear portions of sample and standard curves are parallel. However, analysis of complex biological fluids often yields ... [more ▼]

Quantitative determinations by EIA can be only obtained by reverse regression when linear portions of sample and standard curves are parallel. However, analysis of complex biological fluids often yields sigmoid curves displaying lower slopes, thus invalidating any quantitative interpretation. We hypothesized that this phenomenon was due to a competition effect between the target (for example an antigen) and related molecules for the binding sites (for example a capture antibody) immobilized onto the solid phase. This has been confirmed experimentally using various target-to-competitor ratios and formulated as a mathematical model. The slope decrease in target detection was related to the proportion of competitor, not in a linear, but in an exponential manner. This mathematical model has been computerized and can be used to correct aberrant sample curves provided the relevant parameters have been previously determined in the same systems. A competition effect should be suspected whenever non-parallel EIA sigmoid slopes are obtained. [less ▲]

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See detailLe système immunitaire : principes généraux
Rentier, Bernard ULiege

in Journal de Pharmacie de Belgique (1988), 43(3), 185-211

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See detailSet up of an easy selective method for the isolation of hybrid hybridomas. Evidence for the production of heterobifunctional monoclonal antibodies
Cloes, Jean-Michel; Calberg-Bacq, Claire-Michelle; François, C. et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1988), 96

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See detailAssembly of enveloped RNA viruses - Chapter 7 Assembly of Coronaviridæ
Dubois-Dalcq, Monique; Holmes, Kathryn V; Rentier, Bernard ULiege

Book published by Springer Verlag (1984)

This book is a collection of critical reviews about a diverse group of virus families with two features in common: the stable repository of genetic information in each virus is RNA, and each virus ... [more ▼]

This book is a collection of critical reviews about a diverse group of virus families with two features in common: the stable repository of genetic information in each virus is RNA, and each virus modifies and appropriates a particular patch of the eukaryotic cell membrane system to complete its structure. The reviews take the reader from the level of virus genome structure and expression through the quaternary interactions between virus-specified elements and cellular components that cooperate to produce virus particles. There are spectacular illustrations in this volume, but it is much more than a picture gallery. Reading widely in this book can be an effective antidote to overspecialization: in these pages, you are likely to learn much about viruses and about cells that you didn't know before; you'll discover illuminating parallels between diverse virus families; you'll come away with a sharpened awareness of important things that are still to be learned. Memphis, Tenn. , Summer 1984 David W. Kingsbury Preface This book was written at the suggestion of Dr. David W. Kingsbury made at a work­ shop on viruses organized by the Multiple Sclerosis Society in Aspen, Colorado, U. S. A. , three years ago. Originally, we had thought to focus on the morphological aspects of viral assembly. Later, during our discussions on the process of budding of enveloped RNA viruses, it became evident that we should include biochemical data in our review and correlate them with the structural aspects of virus maturation. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of DNA photosensitization mediated by promazine derivatives on transcription in vitro
Decuyper, J.; Piette, Jacques ULiege; Rentier, Bernard ULiege et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1984), 92(2), 18

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See detailNatural infection of Swiss mice by the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV). 2. Studies on the pathway of infection
Hainaut, P.; Vaira, Dolorès ULiege; Calberg-Bacq, Claire-Michelle et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1984), 92(1), 28

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See detailAcute and persistent viral infections of differentiated nerve cells
Dubois-Dalcq, Monique; Rentier, Bernard ULiege; Hooghe-Peters, Elisabeth L. et al

in Reviews of Infectious Diseases (1982), 4(5), 999-1014

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See detailFibronectin promotes rat Schwann cell growth and motility
Baron-Van Evercooren, Anne; Kleinman, Hinda K.; Seppa, H. E. et al

in Journal of Cell Biology (1982), 93(1), 211-216

Techniques are now available for culturing well characterized and purified Schwann cells. Therefore, we investigated the role of fibronectin in the adhesion, growth, and migration of cultured rat Schwann ... [more ▼]

Techniques are now available for culturing well characterized and purified Schwann cells. Therefore, we investigated the role of fibronectin in the adhesion, growth, and migration of cultured rat Schwann cells. Double-immunolabeling shows that, in primary cultures of rat sciatic nerve, Schwann cells (90%) rarely express fibronectin, whereas fibroblasts (10%) exhibit a granular cytoplasmic and fibrillar surface-associated fibronectin. Secondary cultures of purified Schwann cells do not express fibronectin. Exogenous fibronectin has a small effect on promoting the adhesion of Schwann cells to the substrate and does not significantly affect cell morphology, but it produced a surface fibrillar network on fibronectin on the secondary Schwann cells. Tritiated thymidine autoradiography revealed that addition of fibronectin to the medium, even at low concentrations, markedly stimulates Schwann cell proliferation, in both primary and secondary cultures. In addition, when cell migration was measured in a Boyden chamber assay, fibronectin was found to moderately, but clearly, stimulate directed migration or chemotaxis. [less ▲]

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See detailEtude de l'infection rougeoleuse in vitro et de sa persistance dans les cellules nerveuses en culture
Rentier, Bernard ULiege

in Bulletin de l'Institut Pasteur (1981), 79(2), 107-170

Measles virus can infect neurons in culture. In mouse fetal neurons, infection is spontaneously persistent. Reactivation occurs very rarely. In human fetal neurons, infection is persistent if cells are ... [more ▼]

Measles virus can infect neurons in culture. In mouse fetal neurons, infection is spontaneously persistent. Reactivation occurs very rarely. In human fetal neurons, infection is persistent if cells are cultured in human serum. However, if serum-free medium is used, infection becomes lytic and productive.Latency in mouse neurons is apparently due to the species barrier while latency in human neurons is induced by anti-measles virus antibodies contained in the serum. This might explain the difference between measles encephalitis and subacute sclerosing panencepalitis (SSPE), with presence of anti-measles antibody in the brain in the latter and not in the former. [less ▲]

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See detailStructure and behavior of rat primary and secondary Schwann cells in vitro
Dubois-Dalcq, Monique; Rentier, Bernard ULiege; Baron-Vanevercooren, Anne et al

in Experimental Cell Research (1981), 131(2), 283-297

The structure and motility of isolated rat primary (I) Schwann cells (SC) have been compared to that of subcultured (II) SC during and after mitotic stimulation. I SC contain myelin components which ... [more ▼]

The structure and motility of isolated rat primary (I) Schwann cells (SC) have been compared to that of subcultured (II) SC during and after mitotic stimulation. I SC contain myelin components which persist for 2 weeks in serum-free medium while they rapidly disappear in medium containing serum and high glucose concentration. These components were never detected in II SC. Both I SC and II SC after their mitotic phase are spindle-shaped, contain many intermediate and actin filaments, have no basement membrane but show intense migratory and undulatory activities. Rare fibroblasts in I cultures are recognized by their extremely variable shape, the presence of Thy 1.1 antigen in their membrane and their intense edge ruffling alternating with abrupt translocation. In contrast, I SC movements consist of intracellular translocation of nuclei along SC processes, which retract and extend constantly, and in slow rhythmic undulation episodes (2.3 ± 0.2/min) alternating with migration at 135 ± 50 μ/h. The total number of these episodes per day in serum-free medium is rigorously identical for different cells (166.3 ± 0.2) and this uniformity of frequency suggests a genotypic basis. Cycles, consisting of an undulation episode followed by a resting interval, have mean durations of 8.6 ± 4.1 min and a sharp peak of occurrence at 6 min, with exponential distribution of the longer periods. Motility of II SC is considerably inhibited during mitotic stimulation by cholera toxin and a pituitary extract while SC phenotype has changed to a flat multipolar cell with prominent Golgi and ribosomes. Migration is reduced to 24 ± 2 μ/h and only 2% of the SC show pulsations of the same periodicity as the I SC undulations. A dramatic increase in pulsation frequency occurs 6–12 h after removal of mitogenic factors when 80% of II SC start pulsating twice as fast for 2–3 days. When mitoses cease, SC quickly recover their SC phenotype with rhythmic undulations while migration speed increased to 92 ± 20 μ/h. Thus, in spite of dramatic modification of shape, structure and behavior during mitotic stimulation, SC subsequently recover their unique motility pattern which might be essential for their myelinating function [less ▲]

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See detailScanning and transmission electron microscopy study of antibody-dependent lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity on measles virus-infected cells
Rentier, Bernard ULiege; Wallen, William C.

in Infection and Immunity (1980), 30(1), 303-315

The structural events related to antibody-dependent lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity (ADLC) have been studied on measles virus-infected cells using human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and anti ... [more ▼]

The structural events related to antibody-dependent lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity (ADLC) have been studied on measles virus-infected cells using human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and anti-measles virus serum. The first event in ADLC was a recognition process occurring within 15 min after contact between the infected cells and lymphocytes. Plasma membrane and microvilli of adsorbed PBL were specifically attached to virus-induced ridges over nucleocapsids and to viral buds. After 30 min, a fraction of adsorbed PBL (K cells) changed shape and extended long filipodia toward the target cells which, in turn, showed long villi contacting the PBL. At 4 h, when cytotoxicity as measured by chromium release was maximum, K cells had flattened and numerous blebs and ruffles formed on their surface. The K-cell alterations varied in intensity with the type of measles-infected target cell, but frequently the K cells appeared irreversibly damaged. T- and non-T-cell fractions were separated, and in situ erythrocyte rosettes were used as markers for subpopulations which were easily recognized by scanning electron microscopy. Most of the cytotoxic K cells were identified as non-T cells carrying Fc receptors for immunoglobulin G. However, a small subpopulation of cells bearing both sheep erythrocyte and Fc receptors was also found to be involved in ADLC by chromium release assay as well as by electron microscopy. Some of these interacting T cells extended a long uropod on the target cell, but their intracellular structure remained unaltered through ADLC, in contrast with the other T cells and the non-T killer cells. This suggests that perhaps some T killer cells might remain functional after the cytotoxic interaction with a target cell. [less ▲]

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See detailBehavior and structure of rat primary and secondary Schwann cells in vitro
Dubois-Dalcq, Monique; Rentier, Bernard ULiege; Baron, A. et al

in Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology (1980), 39(3), 350

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See detailAttempt to isolate infectious agent from bone-marrow of patients with multiple sclerosis
Wallen, William C.; Sever, John L.; McFarlin, Dale E. et al

in Lancet (1979), 314(8139), 414-415

An infectious ætiology for multiple sclerosis (MS) has been postulated but none of the agents putatively associated with the disease have, as yet, been proven to be causative.1-4 The reported5 isolation ... [more ▼]

An infectious ætiology for multiple sclerosis (MS) has been postulated but none of the agents putatively associated with the disease have, as yet, been proven to be causative.1-4 The reported5 isolation of an infectious agent from bone-marrow aspiration of patients with MS prompted us to attempt recovery of an agent from our MS patients. We were unable to isolate an agent from seven MS patients with similar cell lines and procedures. There is no apparent reason for our inability to do so. However, we did find an adventitious agent(s) in two commercial sources of Hela cells. Although not initially apparent, this agent(s) became active upon incubation with either MS-patient or control bone-marrow cells and induced large syncytia when passed to other Hela cells. [less ▲]

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See detailElectron microscopic study of measles virus infection: unusual antibody-triggered redistribution of antigens on giant cells
Hooghe-Peters, Elisabeth L.; Rentier, Bernard ULiege; Dubois-Dalcq, Monique

in Journal of Virology (1979), 29(2), 666-676

Vero cells infected with measles virus fuse to form multinucleated cells which incorporated virus- specific antigens in their membrane. The distribution of these antigens was analyzed after a brief ... [more ▼]

Vero cells infected with measles virus fuse to form multinucleated cells which incorporated virus- specific antigens in their membrane. The distribution of these antigens was analyzed after a brief treatment with human anti-measles immunoglobulin G, using autoradiography and immunoperoxidase labeling combined with transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Virus-specific antigens were distributed over the entire surface of giant cells treated at 4°C with human anti-measles immunoglobulin G and labeled Protein A. When cells were shifted to 37°C, labeled antigen-antibody complexes were redistributed in two stages. Patch formation occurred in 5 to 15 min. Later, antigen- antibody complexes became concentrated in a paracentral "ring" rather than typical caps. Patch formation occurred in the presence of metabolic inhibitors, whereas ring formation was inhibited by metabolic inhibitors. These rings contained membrane folds, villi, and viral buds, whereas the rest of the membrane was smooth. In addition, shedding, endocytosis of antigen-antibody complexes, and reexpression of antigens were observed. Antibodies to nonviral membrane antigens induced the same pattern of redistribution. Infected cells treated with anti-measles Fab' fragments maintained a homogeneous distribution of label throughout the experiments. In conclusion, intact immunoglobulins, but not Fab' fragments, were able to induce a dramatic redistribution of viral antigen on the membrane of giant cells infected with measles virus. [less ▲]

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