Publications of Tom De Mil
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailTowards improving the assessment of rainforest carbon: Complementary evidence from repeated diameter measurements and dated wood
Ilondea, Bhely Angoboy; De Mil, Tom ULiege; Hubau, Wannes et al

in Dendrochronologia (2020), 62

We explore whether a growth-ring analysis can produce additional information about carbon budgets in tropical forests. Such forests are characterized by a high number of species and by trees that rarely ... [more ▼]

We explore whether a growth-ring analysis can produce additional information about carbon budgets in tropical forests. Such forests are characterized by a high number of species and by trees that rarely have anatomically distinct annual growth rings, which hampers the application of dendrochronological tools in carbon balance assessments in the tropics. We use forest inventory data and archived annual diameter measurements from the Luki Biosphere Reserve in the southwestern margin of the Congo Basin forest massif. In addition, dated wood data are available from the same location thanks to tag nail traces that allow for the measurement of growth increments over a period of 66 years. We find that precise increment measurements based on dated wood are advisable for small subsets of many less abundant species and for functional species groups characterized by slow growth. The dated wood approach shows that many understory trees with non-periodical rings remain in a steady state for long periods of time. These results suggest a dated wood approach is advisable for studies of growth trajectories of individual trees that might be of importance for carbon assessments in degraded forests. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (12 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailUne forte saisonnalité du climat et de la phénologie reproductive dans la forêt du Mayombe : l’apport des données historiques de la Réserve de Luki en République démocratique du Congo
Ilondea, B. A.; Beeckman, H.; Ouédraogo, D.-Y. et al

in Bois et Forêts des Tropiques (2019), (341), 39-53

En Afrique, la phénologie reproductive des arbres tropicaux, majoritairement annuelle, semble présenter une certaine régularité. Cette étude documente les variations intra- et interannuelles de la ... [more ▼]

En Afrique, la phénologie reproductive des arbres tropicaux, majoritairement annuelle, semble présenter une certaine régularité. Cette étude documente les variations intra- et interannuelles de la phénologie reproductive des arbres de la forêt du Mayombe à partir des données historiques de la Réserve de Luki (République démocratique du Congo). Le diamètre de reproduction des espèces exploitées pour le bois, encore largement méconnu, a été également examiné pour les espèces suffisamment représentées dans les données. Le suivi phénologique de 3 642 arbres appartenant à 158 espèces et 39 familles a été réalisé tous les 10 jours de 1948 à 1957. Les statistiques circulaires ont été utilisées pour tester le synchronisme de la phénologie entre arbres, à l’échelle de la communauté, pour la forêt dans son ensemble, et individuellement pour 87 espèces, dont 35 espèces bien représentées (n ≥ 20 arbres), 16 espèces commerciales et 36 autres espèces. Des régressions logistiques ont permis de déterminer le diamètre de fructification (minimum et régulier) de ces espèces. Pour la majorité des espèces, la floraison était régulière, annuelle et largement saisonnière (81,6 %, 71 espèces). Les pics étaient plus marqués pour la floraison que pour la fructification, plus étalée dans le temps, bien que significativement agrégée temporellement. La majorité des arbres et des espèces fleurissaient entre décembre et février, pendant la petite saison sèche, bien que des fleurs et des fruits étaient observables toute l’année à l’échelle de la communauté. Seules 13 espèces ont montré une relation significative entre le diamètre et la reproduction, parmi lesquelles sept espèces de canopée, cinq de sous-bois et une héliophile. Pour ces espèces, la moyenne du diamètre minimum de reproduction était de 17,3 cm. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailThe persistence of carbon in the African forest understory
Hubau, Wannes; De Mil, Tom ULiege; Van den Bulcke, Jan et al

in Nature Plants (2019)

Quantifying carbon dynamics in forests is critical for understanding their role in long-term climate regulation1–4. Yet little is known about tree longevity in tropical forests3,5–8, a factor that is ... [more ▼]

Quantifying carbon dynamics in forests is critical for understanding their role in long-term climate regulation1–4. Yet little is known about tree longevity in tropical forests3,5–8, a factor that is vital for estimating carbon persistence3,4. Here we calculate mean carbon age (the period that carbon is fixed in trees7) in different strata of African tropical forests using (1) growthring records with a unique timestamp accurately demarcating 66 years of growth in one site and (2) measurements of diameter increments from the African Tropical Rainforest Observation Network (23 sites). We find that in spite of their much smaller size, in understory trees mean carbon age (74 years) is greater than in sub-canopy (54 years) and canopy (57 years) trees and similar to carbon age in emergent trees (66 years). The remarkable carbon longevity in the understory results from slow and aperiodic growth as an adaptation to limited resource availability9–11. Our analysis also reveals that while the understory represents a small share (11%) of the carbon stock12,13, it contributes disproportionally to the forest carbon sink (20%). We conclude that accounting for the diversity of carbon age and carbon sequestration among different forest strata is critical for effective conservation management14–16 and for accurate modelling of carbon cycling4. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 88 (25 ULiège)