Publications of Elodie Hut
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See detailThe State of Environmental Migration 2019: A Review of 2018
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege; Castillo Betancourt, Tatiana ULiege; Hut, Elodie ULiege

Book published by Presses universitaires de Liège (2020)

Edited by The Hugo Observatory of the University of Liège, this volume is the ninth in the annual series and the fourth of its kind published with the Presses Universitaires de Liège. The State of ... [more ▼]

Edited by The Hugo Observatory of the University of Liège, this volume is the ninth in the annual series and the fourth of its kind published with the Presses Universitaires de Liège. The State of Environmental Migration aims to provide its readership with the most updated assessments on recent events and evolving dynamics of environmental migration throughout the world. Each year, the editors select the best graduate student work from the course “Environment and Migration” taught by Caroline Zickgraf at the Paris School of International Affairs (PSIA) of Sciences Po. In this edition, the effects on migration and displacement of some of the most dramatic disasters of 2018 are studied, including the Sulawesi earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia, Hurricane Florence and Camp Fire (which was the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California’s history) in the United States, and the Volcán de Fuego eruption in Guatemala. The relationship between progressive environmental changes and migration in the Nepalese Hindu Kush Himalayas, and the effects of armed conflicts on the prevention and management of disaster-induced displacement in Afghanistan are also analysed and discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailCOVID-19, Climate Change and Migration: Constructing Crises, Reinforcing Borders
Hut, Elodie ULiege; Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege; Gemenne, François ULiege et al

Article for general public (2020)

Migration, climate change and public health are three key policy challenges of this early 21st century. Far from being isolated, these challenges are linked with one another, both directly and indirectly ... [more ▼]

Migration, climate change and public health are three key policy challenges of this early 21st century. Far from being isolated, these challenges are linked with one another, both directly and indirectly. The connections between them have never been as apparent as in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic: borders and immobility played a central role in the response, and COVID-19 has been tied to climate change, for instance, with regards to the temporary positive impact of lockdown measures on CO2 emissions. In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, many have suggested that similar measures should be replicated in the fight against climate change, while others have deemed this as misguided and pointed to the potentially counterproductive effects of such claims. Lastly, physical distancing requirements are expected to further complicate responses to climate-related displacement (as recently confirmed in East India and Bangladesh, where Cyclone Amphan struck). In addition to such relationships, a uniting feature of these three phenomena is the way they each have been labelled, perceived, and reacted to from a crisis perspective. Crisis framing is not just about how each topic is covered in the media or discussed in the public eye: crisis narratives translate into, and justify, short-term, ad-hoc responses instead of preemptive, integrated approaches that may be more appropriate given the global and systemic nature of these phenomena. The opposite is equally true: emergency measures (e.g. evacuations, lockdowns, state-of-emergency declarations) can also play a role in creating and exacerbating crises. Moreover, measures in each crisis, whether health, climate or migration-related, have resulted in calls for, or the actual, restriction of migration and mobility, whether to contain the spread of a virus, to lower carbon emissions, or to restrict incoming migration flows deemed massive and/or sudden. [less ▲]

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See detailClimate migration myths
Boas, Ingrid; Farbotko, Carol; Adams, Helen et al

in Nature Climate Change (2019), 9

Misleading claims about mass migration induced by climate change continue to surface in both academia and policy. This requires a new research agenda on ‘climate mobilities’ that moves beyond simplistic ... [more ▼]

Misleading claims about mass migration induced by climate change continue to surface in both academia and policy. This requires a new research agenda on ‘climate mobilities’ that moves beyond simplistic assumptions and more accurately advances knowledge of the nexus between human mobility and climate change. [less ▲]

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See detailLa Géopolitique du changement climatique
Hut, Elodie ULiege

Speech/Talk (2019)

Panel description: Partout dans le monde, les changements climatiques bouleversent les équilibres locaux, entraînant une multiplication des conflits, des mouvements de population et posant des problèmes ... [more ▼]

Panel description: Partout dans le monde, les changements climatiques bouleversent les équilibres locaux, entraînant une multiplication des conflits, des mouvements de population et posant des problèmes d’accès aux ressources. Quelle est l’incidence de ces changements climatiques sur les actions de solidarité internationale ? [less ▲]

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See detailMigration into and within Europe and Security Issues
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege; Hut, Elodie ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

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See detailNavigating between hospitality and hostility. How did EU migration hotspots develop into spaces of migration governance crisis? An analysis of asylum seekers’ experiences in Lesbos Island, Greece
Hut, Elodie ULiege

Conference (2019, June 19)

This paper presents the research objectives and conceptual framework of a PhD thesis being conducted within the context of the MAGYC project. This will be done in accordance with its general objective to ... [more ▼]

This paper presents the research objectives and conceptual framework of a PhD thesis being conducted within the context of the MAGYC project. This will be done in accordance with its general objective to appraise policy responses in light of the “migration crisis” and to assess their efficiency for the long-term governance of migration in the European Union (EU). In particular, the PhD study in question tests the relevance of concepts which are often pertinent in migration studies and human geography – such as “fragmented journeys” (Hammer et al., 1997), “borderscapes”(Bocchi et al. 2005), “non-spaces” (Augé 1992), “immobility” (Conlon 2011) and “liminal spaces” (Papadopoulos et al. 2008) – and the extent to which they may be applied to the current context in the “hotspots”, which we define as spaces of reception, identification, and processing of arrivals established in 2015 by the EU to manage migratory pressure at its external borders. The author suggests that migration hotspots, and specifically the one established in the Greek island of Lesbos, became both a factor and a symbol of the asylum governance crisis at EU and national levels. In order to do so, the study unveils the different expressions of this multifaceted and spatial-temporal crisis based on the personal and collective perceptions and experiences of a range of stakeholders, at the crux of which lie asylum seekers – whom are theoretically “transiting” through Lesbos but who, we will argue, are forced into immobility, or ‘trapped in transit’ as a result of the hotspot policy. This qualitative analysis will be complemented by an assessment of how local populations, humanitarian actors and political authorities at both the national and European level – among other stakeholders – have perceived, reacted to and dealt with the “crisis” through their migrant reception policies and practices, alternating between hospitality and hostility. The paper shall focus on laying down the conceptual framework of this PhD thesis and will include a stakeholder mapping exercise, in order to serve as a basis for subsequent field work and primary data collection in the Greek hotspot of Lesbos (through semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, key informant interviews and field observations). [less ▲]

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See detailAppraising the role of the environment as a shaping element of migrants’ fragmented journeys
Hut, Elodie ULiege

Conference (2019, June 06)

When studying the multi-causality of human (im)mobility, environmental changes are increasingly identified as primary migration or displacement drivers (IDMC, 2019). At the same time, the minimalist ... [more ▼]

When studying the multi-causality of human (im)mobility, environmental changes are increasingly identified as primary migration or displacement drivers (IDMC, 2019). At the same time, the minimalist perspective suggests that the situation is in fact more complex and that environmental drivers interact with economic, social, demographic and political factors in shaping migration decision-making and trajectories (Suhrke, 1993; Hugo, 1996). As such, we must acknowledge the existence of a continuum between the different drivers and patterns of mobility. Focusing on the “new mobilities” paradigm (Sheller and Urry, 2006), which cuts across a wide range of disciplines and centres on the study of the movement itself, rather than on its drivers, it seems relevant to connect the concept of ‘fragmented journeys’ to environmentally-induced mobility. This can be done by interrogating the extent to which environmental factors (both sudden-onset and slow-onset) influence contemporary mixed migration flows and pathways in both space and time, from areas of origin to areas of transit and/or destination, throughout different migration phases, as opposed to analysing them as mere drivers of initial outward mobility. This is the aim of the MIGRADAPT project, which uses the concept of fragmented journeys as one of its founding hypotheses, suggesting that environmental factors (and the perceptions of them), in their interaction with socio-economic factors, play a role throughout migrants’ fragmented journeys to Europe – and more specifically to Belgium. [less ▲]

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See detailLe réchauffement climatique: Quel impact pour les droits humains?
Hut, Elodie ULiege

Speech/Talk (2019)

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See detailSans coopération, pas de gestion des migrations
Hut, Elodie ULiege

Article for general public (2019)

La question migratoire a constitué un facteur décisif en faveur du « Brexit » en 2016. Les débats internes concernant l’adoption du Pacte global sur les migrations en décembre dernier ont quant à eux ... [more ▼]

La question migratoire a constitué un facteur décisif en faveur du « Brexit » en 2016. Les débats internes concernant l’adoption du Pacte global sur les migrations en décembre dernier ont quant à eux provoqué la chute du gouvernement Michel en Belgique. Quelles leçons en tirer  ? [less ▲]

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See detailMigrant-e-s: quel accueil?
Hut, Elodie ULiege

Speech/Talk (2019)

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See detailMaking Migration Work for Adaptation. A Belgian Appraisal (The MIGRADAPT Project)
Hut, Elodie ULiege

Conference (2018, November 15)

In the dichotomy between migrants and refugees/asylum-seekers, the former are typically cast as economically motivated, and set apart from refugees fleeing war and persecution. Yet environmental changes ... [more ▼]

In the dichotomy between migrants and refugees/asylum-seekers, the former are typically cast as economically motivated, and set apart from refugees fleeing war and persecution. Yet environmental changes are increasingly a part of complex migration journeys calling into question the distinction made between migrants and refugees. At the same time, in international negotiations on climate change, migration is increasingly presented as a possible adaptation strategy to the impacts of climate change. However, only few studies exist to show under which conditions migration could actually be a feasible adaptation strategy, and none of them address migration to Belgium. This is the goal of the MIGRADAPT project. This paper sets the theoretical framework of this project which is delineated into two major components; 1) To analyse the role of environmental factors as influencing traditional migration drivers throughout migrants fragmented journeys (with a particular attention to perceptions), and 2) To understand under which socio-economic and political conditions migrants in Belgium can support the adaptation and resilience of their communities of origin. [less ▲]

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See detailReducing Disaster Displacement Risk in Southern Africa: Opportunities and Challenges
Hut, Elodie ULiege

Conference (2018, October 17)

The 2014-2016 El Nino-related drought, the 2014 Malawi floods, and the 2017 Cyclone Dineo are examples of disasters that have displaced hundreds of thousands of people across the Southern African region ... [more ▼]

The 2014-2016 El Nino-related drought, the 2014 Malawi floods, and the 2017 Cyclone Dineo are examples of disasters that have displaced hundreds of thousands of people across the Southern African region in the recent years. Most disaster responses so far have been reactive rather than preemptive, highlighting the need to promote resilience and preparedness in the face of both slow-onset and sudden-onset disasters. Whilst on the global level governance frameworks are being pushed to improve the integration of climate and disaster-induced displacement across the world (e.g. the Platform for Disaster Displacement, the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss & Damage’s Task Force on Displacement, the soon-to-be-adopted Global Compact on Migration, as well as global instruments of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction - SFDRR), implementation at the local and regional scales remains slow and challenging. This paper will take stock of the initiatives that have been introduced at the national and regional levels to prevent and better manage disaster displacement in the Southern African region, measure their success, and interrogate the opportunity to further mainstream displacement into the four priorities for action of the SFDRR, the underlying objectives being to improve the decision-making capacity of policy-makers and practitioners in the sub-region, as well as to reduce the overall vulnerability of Southern African populations to disaster risk. This paper will include a desk study and qualitative interviews with representatives from national and local governments, regional and international organisations, as well as the research community. It will provide concrete recommendations on how the SADC region could best prepare evacuations, implement early warning systems and document disaster displacement, as well as improve the coordination of national and regional disaster risk reduction mechanisms (strategies and policies) as far as human mobility is concerned. This paper will further seek to advocate for the comprehensive integration of displaced populations throughout the disaster risk management cycle, in order to build the resilience of both displaced people and their host communities across SADC. [less ▲]

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See detailMaking Migration Work for Adaptation. A Belgian Appraisal (The MIGRADAPT Project)
Hut, Elodie ULiege

Conference (2018, July 03)

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See detailThe State of Environmental Migration 2018: A review of 2017
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege; Hut, Elodie ULiege; Gemenne, François ULiege

Book published by Presses universitaires de Liège (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (4 ULiège)