Publications of Guillaume Gregoire
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailThe Economic Constitution under Weimar. Doctrinal controversies and ideological struggles
Gregoire, Guillaume ULiege

Conference (2021, July 09)

The notion of “economic constitution”, which is today primarily linked to European integration, stems nevertheless from the turbulent interwar period of the Weimar Republic (1919-1933). With a specific ... [more ▼]

The notion of “economic constitution”, which is today primarily linked to European integration, stems nevertheless from the turbulent interwar period of the Weimar Republic (1919-1933). With a specific section dedicated to the “order of economic life”, the Weimar Constitution represents a quite unique constitutional configuration that blends liberal economic principles with social objectives and with a significant number of potentially collectivist provisions. This unstable balance gave rise to an intense doctrinal debate around the concept of Wirtschaftsverfassung. The social-democratic scholars, leaded by Hugo Sinzheimer, advocated a politicization and a democratization of the economy. In an a priori paradoxical move, Schmitt and the conservative legal doctrine radicalized the socialist definition of “economic constitution”… but to better reject it for the Weimar Republic. Instead of this extension of state interventions in the economy (leading to an “economic state”), they called for an authoritarian but self-limiting state that would subordinate the economy to its authority (through cartelization) while preserving a sphere of private economic freedom. Against both these positions, the liberal Franz Böhm carried out a real theoretical coup de force: he endorsed the conservative critique of the “economic state”, but subverted Schmitt’s analysis to propose a truly liberal meaning of the concept of Wirtschaftsverfassung, where the “strong state” has to serve the market order and to apply the principles of the rule of law in the economy. This (neo)liberal meaning of the concept of “economic constitution” has prevailed since the end of the World War II, notably with the European legal and economic integration. But the European economic constitution, built around a market order, seem to have entered a phase of growing opposition. In this respect, the Weimar debates might shed light on our current issues and, who knows, enable dissenting voices to reopen the path to economic democracy. [less ▲]

Full Text
See detailL'économie de Karlsruhe. L’intégration européenne à l’épreuve du juge constitutionnel allemand
Gregoire, Guillaume ULiege

in Courrier Hebdomadaire du CRISP (2021), 2490-2491

With the PSPP ruling of 5 May 2020, the German Federal Constitutional Court (FCC) for the first time openly challenged the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) on the highly political issue of ... [more ▼]

With the PSPP ruling of 5 May 2020, the German Federal Constitutional Court (FCC) for the first time openly challenged the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) on the highly political issue of the European Central Bank (ECB)'s management of the sovereign debt crisis. From the outset, this episode proved crucial for the future of European integration. Based on an in-depth discussion of this decision and the controversies it raised, this Courrier hebdomadaire aims to highlight the economic rationale that underlies the FCC’s legally reasoning. Although very consistent from a legal point of view, the decision is nevertheless ideologically oriented and imbued with neo-classical liberal theories that have shaped the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). This rationale undermines the constitutional principle of the "economic neutrality" of the Basic Law, yet endorsed by the FCC since the early days of the Federal Republic of Germany. Through legal studies, discourse analysis, and theoretical and historical contextualization of the issues at stake, this survey carried out by Guillaume Grégoire provides a broader perspective on the depoliticization of some of the most fundamental economic issues facing our European democracies, which have progressively been constitutionalized and entrusted to the tutelary authority of the supreme judges. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLa juridictionnalisation des controverses monétaires ou l’émergence du juge constitutionnel comme gardien de l’ordre de marché
Gregoire, Guillaume ULiege

Conference (2021, April 08)

L’ordonnancement des politiques monétaires, financières et budgétaires par le droit de l’Union économique et monétaire (UEM), pourtant constitutionnellement avalisé par la Cour constitutionnelle fédérale ... [more ▼]

L’ordonnancement des politiques monétaires, financières et budgétaires par le droit de l’Union économique et monétaire (UEM), pourtant constitutionnellement avalisé par la Cour constitutionnelle fédérale allemande à l’occasion de l’arrêt Maastricht du 12 octobre 1993, a donné lieu, suite à la crise des dettes souveraines, à un déplacement sur le terrain juridictionnel des contestations relatives à ces politiques économiques, amenant notamment les juges de Karlsruhe à s’opposer ouvertement à la doctrine monétaire du « whatever it takes » de la BCE, afin d’imposer au contraire leur Wirtschaftsanschauung, leur propre « vision du monde économique ». La crise des dettes souveraines a pu dès lors servir de catalyseur et de révélateur des référentiels économiques implicites de certaines juridictions suprêmes – et, en premier lieu, de ceux de la Cour constitutionnelle fédérale allemande et de la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne. Se dévoile toutefois, en creux, un certain paradoxe : l’affrontement juridictionnel s’est certes fait, selon Karlsruhe, au nom du principe constitutionnel de démocratie, mais les affaires en cause témoignent au contraire d’une montée en puissance des juridictions suprêmes comme gardien de l’ordre de marché et comme figure émergente d’une nouvelle « épistocratie » économique. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailL'impossible mutualisation des dettes souveraines selon Karlsruhe
Gregoire, Guillaume ULiege

in Revue de l'euro (2021), 55

Although less discussed in the literature, the last part of German Constitutional Court’s decision of May 5th, 2020, concerning the conformity of the PSPP program with regards to the monetary financing ... [more ▼]

Although less discussed in the literature, the last part of German Constitutional Court’s decision of May 5th, 2020, concerning the conformity of the PSPP program with regards to the monetary financing prohibition of the Member States and the no bail-out clause (Art. 123 and 125 TFEU) contains statements of fundamental importance for the future of European integration. The Karlsruhe judges endeavored indeed to render meaningless a primary law provision potentially allowing for the sharing, among the central banks of the Eurosystem, of the risks of losses due to a possible sovereign default - risk sharing which would involve a “monetary mutualization” of national public debts. But they also undermined this possibility in the future, even in the event of an express amendment of the treaties. At a time of so-called “Keynesian” inflection of the German government and parliament – aiming to handle the economic consequences of the Coronavirus health crisis –, this jurisprudence imbued with neo-classical and monetarist theses poses however real challenges, both for the German constitutional balance and for the stability of the Economic and Monetary Union. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (7 ULiège)
See detailLes parlements ont-ils encore leur mot à dire sur l’économie ?
Gregoire, Guillaume ULiege

Diverse speeche and writing (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLe plan de relance européen face au risque de Karlsruhe
Gregoire, Guillaume ULiege

Article for general public (2020)

Le plan de relance de 750 milliards d'euros proposé par Ursula Von der Leyen, qui prolonge la proposition Macron-Merkel, cherche à contourner la décision des juges de Karlsruhe qui empêche l’Allemagne de ... [more ▼]

Le plan de relance de 750 milliards d'euros proposé par Ursula Von der Leyen, qui prolonge la proposition Macron-Merkel, cherche à contourner la décision des juges de Karlsruhe qui empêche l’Allemagne de participer à une “mutualisation monétaire” des dettes nationales. Si ce projet échoue, c’est la survie même de la zone euro qui est compromise, risquant de se fracturer sous la pression des marchés financiers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 136 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLa politique monétaire de la BCE au coeur de la guerre des juges et du conflit de souveraineté
Gregoire, Guillaume ULiege

Article for general public (2020)

"Le juriste Guillaume Grégoire observe dans une tribune au « Monde » que la décision de la Cour constitutionnelle allemande à l’encontre de la BCE souligne à la fois le conflit entre les juridictions ... [more ▼]

"Le juriste Guillaume Grégoire observe dans une tribune au « Monde » que la décision de la Cour constitutionnelle allemande à l’encontre de la BCE souligne à la fois le conflit entre les juridictions européennes et le déficit de démocratie de la gouvernance économique dans l’Union" [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 132 (9 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailNaturalisme économique et suprématie du juge constitutionnel : un renforcement mutuel ?
Gregoire, Guillaume ULiege

Conference (2019, July 04)

Sous l’influence de diverses théories situées au confluent des sciences juridique, économique et politique, un phénomène de constitutionnalisation progressive de certaines options de politique économique ... [more ▼]

Sous l’influence de diverses théories situées au confluent des sciences juridique, économique et politique, un phénomène de constitutionnalisation progressive de certaines options de politique économique peut être constaté depuis quelques décennies, principalement au niveau de l’Union européenne. Notre hypothèse de travail est que ce processus, qui participe d’une radicalisation de la théorie de l’État de droit dans la sphère économique, pourrait s’expliquer, à tout le moins en partie, par la perméabilité du droit à un certain naturalisme qui imprègne différents courants de la science économique. Or, cette posture naturaliste, importée dans la sphère politico-juridique en tant qu’instrument de légitimation de certains choix économiques, pourrait, selon nous, induire autant que procéder de la montée en puissance politique des juridictions constitutionnelles. Autrement dit, les deux mouvements de consécration constitutionnelle d’une conception naturaliste de l’économie et d’institutionnalisation du juge constitutionnel en organe suprême de l’ordre juridique, s’ils ne se recouvrent pas entièrement, se renforceraient cependant mutuellement. D’une part, là où les théories économiques restent, en tant que théories à prétention scientifique, exposées au critère poppérien de falsifiabilité, la prétendue naturalité des axiomes et hypothèses à la base de ces théories et, par extension, des principes découlant de celles-ci implique au contraire le postulat de leur irréfutabilité. L’« irrévisabilité » (certes relative) des normes constitutionnelles consacrerait alors, dans le champ juridique, l’irréfutabilité supposée des principes dégagés par ces théories naturalistes. L’invocation, dans le champ politico-juridique, de la naturalité de certains principes dégagés par ces théories économiques justifie dès lors leur sanctuarisation constitutionnelle et la délégation de leur protection à une institution supra-législative, supposée neutre et objective : le juge constitutionnel. De ce fait, cette perméabilité du droit au naturalisme défendu par certains courants de la science économique peut expliquer ex ante, partiellement à tout le moins, la montée en puissance politique des juridictions constitutionnelles au sein des ordres juridiques contemporains. D’autre part, ce naturalisme économique constitue, ex post, un puissant levier de légitimation du mécanisme de contrôle de constitutionnalité – et du transfert du pouvoir suprême du législateur vers le juge constitutionnel qu’il induit –, même lorsque l’établissement de ce contrôle ne procède pas, au départ, de ce naturalisme. Face à l’impossibilité logique de justifier le contrôle de constitutionnalité – et le transfert de souveraineté qu’il implique – sur le fondement du principe démocratique , le recours au naturalisme libéral – tant celui du marché que celui des droits de l’homme – constitue un moyen particulièrement efficace de légitimation d’une institution fondée, dans la tradition continentale du moins, sur les principes de neutralité, d’impartialité et d’objectivité qui nimbent le pouvoir politique inhérent à la fonction juridictionnelle. La légitimité du juge constitutionnel résiderait ainsi dans une capacité à protéger et à garantir certains principes prétendument naturels (en l’occurrence économiques) face à l’arbitraire inhérent au pouvoir, fût-il démocratique. Cependant, si cette hypothèse se vérifie, ces considérations nous amèneront alors à interroger le paradoxe de cette (auto)légitimation naturaliste du juge constitutionnel à l’intérieur d’ordres juridiques continuant formellement de se revendiquer, implicitement ou explicitement, démocratiques. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (14 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLe marché, instance disciplinaire des États dans le cadre de l’Union économique et monétaire : des théories économiques aux cadres juridiques
Gregoire, Guillaume ULiege

in Politeia. Revue semestrielle de droit constitutionnel comparé (2019), 35

The Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) is based on an original asymmetry between its monetary (centralised) pillar and its economic and budgetary (decentralised) pillar. The latter is structured around a ... [more ▼]

The Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) is based on an original asymmetry between its monetary (centralised) pillar and its economic and budgetary (decentralised) pillar. The latter is structured around a specific normative triptych: financial accountability of Member States through the triple prohibition of budgetary solidarity, monetary financing and privileged access to financial institutions; economic coordination through the Broad Economic Policy Guidelines; budgetary coercion through the Stability and Growth Pact as well as the excessive deficit procedure. This original architecture is based on a specific logic: establishing the market as a veridictional and disciplinarizing body for States. By deepening the framework for the monitoring and control of Member States’ economic and budgetary policies, on the one hand, and by establishing financial assistance mechanisms subject to strict conditionality, on the other hand, the reforms introduced in the aftermath of the sovereign debt crisis are in line with the logic of market-based disciplinarization of the Member States. However, by inducing an evolution in the ultimate sanction of this market disciplinary logic, they actually change the relationship between the State and the market and, therefore, transform the very meaning of the concept of “market” in the EMU legal framework. The latter would have moved from a Hayekian understanding – according to which it exists only as a concrete reality whose functioning could never be successfully corrected by external intervention – to an understanding closer to the original ordoliberalism, according to which the market would represent an ideal-type (i.e. an abstract hypothetical norm) guaranteed in the last resort by the public authority itself. This evolution of the EMU legal framework then leads us to question, on the one hand, the conformity of these reforms with the primary EU law and, on the other hand, the implicit reasons for this legal enshrinement of the market disciplinary logic. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 138 (43 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLe contrôle de l'intégration européenne à l'aune du principe démocratique : le cas du Tribunal constitutionnel fédéral allemand
Gregoire, Guillaume ULiege

in Miny, Xavier; Quintart, Aurélie; Cordier, Quentin (Eds.) et al The Strong, the Weak and the Law. Proceedings of the 6th ACCA Conference held in Liege on June 23, 2017 (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (15 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailEntre la constitutionnalisation et l’expertalisation du droit économique, quelle place pour la démocratie ?
Gregoire, Guillaume ULiege

Conference (2018, June 11)

A partir d’une illustration topique (l’affaire Outright Monetary Transactions (OMT), qui a vu s’opposer la CJUE et le Bundesverfassungsgericht sur la question de la conformité des politiques monétaires de ... [more ▼]

A partir d’une illustration topique (l’affaire Outright Monetary Transactions (OMT), qui a vu s’opposer la CJUE et le Bundesverfassungsgericht sur la question de la conformité des politiques monétaires de la Banque centrale européenne aux traités de l’Union européenne lors de la crise des dettes souveraines), la contribution proposée vise à mettre en évidence comment le double phénomène de constitutionnalisation et d’expertalisation du droit économique rentre nécessairement en tension avec le principe démocratique. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (15 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailCrise des dettes souveraines et risque de conflit juridictionnel : retour sur l’affaire Outright monetary Transactions
Gregoire, Guillaume ULiege

in Revue de Droit International et de Droit Comparé (2018), (1), 147-181

The German Federal Constitutional Court judgment of June 21th 2016 is the last episode of a long saga in which the FCC and the CJEU have been opposed each other regarding the compliance with European ... [more ▼]

The German Federal Constitutional Court judgment of June 21th 2016 is the last episode of a long saga in which the FCC and the CJEU have been opposed each other regarding the compliance with European Union Law of the European Central Bank (ECB)’s action during the sovereign debt crisis and, consequently, concerning the existence of a tacit constitutional mutation of the ECB's mandate. In its decision, the Federal Constitutional Court confirms the conformity of the ECB's monetary program (Outright Monetary Transactions) with EU law and German constitutional law, but maintains nevertheless some "serious objections" against the CJEU's position, thus nourishing the possibility – also perceptible in other EU Member States (France and Belgium in particular) – of an open confrontation between national constitutional courts and the CJEU. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (20 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLa Banque centrale européenne et la crise des dettes souveraines : politique monétaire, politique économique ou état d’exception ?
Gregoire, Guillaume ULiege

in Revue Internationale de Droit Economique (2017), XXXI(3), 33-54

The German Federal Constitutional Court (FCC) judgment of June 21, 2016 is the last episode of a long saga in which the FCC and the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) have opposed each other ... [more ▼]

The German Federal Constitutional Court (FCC) judgment of June 21, 2016 is the last episode of a long saga in which the FCC and the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) have opposed each other regarding the European Central Bank (ECB)’s compliance with European Union law in its action during the sovereign debt crisis, and especially concerning its Outright Monetary Transactions (OMT) Program. In accordance with its role as guardian of the German constitutional legal order, the FCC implemented its jurisprudential-based ultra vires review (i.e. checking that EU institutions did not infringe their mandate attributed by the German Act of Approval of EU Treaties). In this context, the FCC referred for the first time in its history to the CJEU for a preliminary ruling concerning the ECB’s mandate (Articles 119 and 127 TFEU) and the monetary financing prohibition (Article 123 TFEU). However, this first direct jurisdictional dialogue resulted in an arm-wrestling match between the FCC and the CJEU rather than in any genuine judicial cooperation: the reference for a preliminary ruling was closer to an ultimatum and a “pre-declaration of invalidity”; in response, the CJEU ruling, behind its apparent openness, totally rejected the FCC reasoning, declared the OMT program consistent with EU primary law, and stressed the primacy of EU law over domestic law—even constitutional—as well as the binding nature of the solutions identified in its decisions. Finally, in its decision of June 21, 2016, the FCC accepted the CJEU’s position and confirmed the conformity of the OMT Program with EU law and German constitutional law. Nevertheless, this acceptance certainly does not imply approval and endorsement and the FCC maintains “serious objections” against the CJEU’s position, which are not, we believe, totally groundless. In spite of the arguments often developed about the irrationality of the markets on the one hand, and the state of exception (the sovereign debt crisis) on the other, it can indeed be argued, in our opinion, that the ECB’s mandate is subject to a tacit constitutional change, its OMT Program being one of the manifestations, and, consequently, that there was indeed a breach of the Treaties. These “serious objections” expressed by the FCC therefore bespeak the persistence of a profound disagreement on the interpretation to be given to the EU primary law concerning the distinction between monetary and economic policies and the resulting distribution of powers. In this context, the legal inconsistency consisting of transferring competences to the ECB without beforehand amending the Treaties is particularly likely to lead in the near future to new jurisdictional tensions between the FCC and the CJEU. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 120 (24 ULiège)