Publications of François Debras
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailJe ne suis pas complotiste mais…
Debras, François ULiege

Article for general public (2021)

Pourquoi nous sommes sensibles aux théories du complot? Comment pouvons-nous porter un regard critique sur la formation de notre jugement ? Pour cela, interrogeons trois biais cognitifs: le biais de ... [more ▼]

Pourquoi nous sommes sensibles aux théories du complot? Comment pouvons-nous porter un regard critique sur la formation de notre jugement ? Pour cela, interrogeons trois biais cognitifs: le biais de confirmation, le biais de conjonction et le biais d'intentionnalité. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLe chant des sirènes: : quand l’extrême droite parle de démocratie. Analyse critique des discours du Rassemblement National (RN) en France, du Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs (FPÖ) en Autriche et de l’Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) en Allemagne
Debras, François ULiege

Doctoral thesis (2021)

Seen as opposed to the institutions or values of democracy, far-right political parties portray themselves as the promoters and defenders of democracy against a range of internal and external enemies ... [more ▼]

Seen as opposed to the institutions or values of democracy, far-right political parties portray themselves as the promoters and defenders of democracy against a range of internal and external enemies. Some authors argue that recourse to the term ‘democracy' in their discourse is essentially symbolic and linked to a strategy of 'de-demonisation' or 'normalisation'. I question this claim by asking myself how and why far-right parties use the term 'democracy' in their discourse. To do so, I have studied the discourse of three political parties, the Rassemblement National (RN) in France, the Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs (FPÖ) in Austria and the Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) in Germany. I apply a critical discourse analysis in three steps : lexicometric analysis, semantic and rhetorical analysis and socio-ideological analysis. In this way, I highlight the different functions of the term 'democracy' while also underlining tensions in the discourses of these parties. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailThe Sirens' Song: Use of the Term "Democracy" in the Speeches of the RN, the FPÖ and the AfD
Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2021, February 25)

Historically, the literature has defined the “far right”, the “radical right” or “right-wing populism” (hereafter RWP) as political organizations that are opposed to democracy. Depending on the author ... [more ▼]

Historically, the literature has defined the “far right”, the “radical right” or “right-wing populism” (hereafter RWP) as political organizations that are opposed to democracy. Depending on the author considered, this opposition is institutional (RWP wants to overthrow democratic institutions) or valorical (RWP would be incompatible with a democratic society). However, if we question the political field, RWP in its speech presents itself as the defender of democracy. Thus, in France, the Rassemblement National (RN), in Austria, the Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs (FPÖ) and, in Germany, the Alternative für Deutschland (AfD), aim to “recover”, “restore”, or “protect” democracy. Through this “democratic rhetoric”, the literature argues that this is essentially a symbolic discourse rooted in a strategy of “normalization” of the parties to make them respectable in the eyes of the voter. I aim to further refine this assumption by asking the question: in the speeches of these parties, is “democracy” only a symbolic term, a strategic argument or is “democracy” also ideologically loaded? In other words, could it be argued that “democracy”, in populist discourse, corresponds to a symbolic argument as well as a very specific ideological lexis? To answer this question, I first propose to concentre on the relationship between RWP and democracy as studied in the literature. Second, I will study the term “democracy” in RN, FPÖ and AfD discourses by carrying out a lexicometric analysis before combining it with a critical discourse analysis, from a more qualitative perspective. The objective is to question the context of the enunciation of the term “democracy”. “Discourse” is here defined as the addition of a text and its context structured by an enunciation. So discourse must be studied as a tool or as a mode of access to intentions, strategies or ideologies. For this presentation, I decided to study all the discourses of these parties available on their websites between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2018. Third, I will deal with different functions of the term “democracy” in the discourse (emotional, symbolic, rhetorical, legitimacy and ideological function) while highlighting some of the tensions in its rhetoric. The case of the FPÖ allows me to compare the speeches of a party that is a member of the opposition and then a member of the government. Finally, I will conclude my presentation by answering my research question and relate it to the notion of illiberal an identity democracy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailThe Sirens’ Song: When Right-Wing Populism Deals with “Democracy”. The Case of the RN in France and FPÖ in Austria
Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2020, September 09)

A significant part of the literature considers that right-wing populist parties are anti-democratic. According to some authors, these parties are opposed to democratic institutions. And for other authors ... [more ▼]

A significant part of the literature considers that right-wing populist parties are anti-democratic. According to some authors, these parties are opposed to democratic institutions. And for other authors, right-wing populism respects electoral rules, respects the institutional game but is opposed to the values of democracy. On the other hand, in the political field, right-wing populist parties consider themselves to be democratic parties. They present themselves as the defenders of the people, the promoters of a true democracy. Against the European Union, against other political parties, against immigration, against Islam etc I therefore think it could be interesting to ask the following questions: 1) How does right-wing populism define democracy? 2) Why does right-wing populism mobilize democracy in its speeches? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailFunctions of the Word “Democracy” in Right-Wing Populist Discourses; the Case of the Rassemblement National in France
Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2020, August 28)

The Rassemblement National underlines that democracy is a fundamental principle of the French Republic. The literature argues that this is a symbolic discourse rooted in a strategy of “normalization”. I ... [more ▼]

The Rassemblement National underlines that democracy is a fundamental principle of the French Republic. The literature argues that this is a symbolic discourse rooted in a strategy of “normalization”. I aim to further revise this assumption by asking the question: is “democracy” only a symbolic term, a strategic argument or - and this is the hypothesis that I intend to demonstrate - is the word “democracy” also ideologically loaded? In other words, it be argued that “democracy”, in populist discourse, corresponds to a symbolic argument as well as a very specific ideological corpus? I will study the term “democracy” by carrying out a lexicometric analysis before combining it with a critical discourse analysis. I will then deal with different functions of the term “democracy” while highlighting some of the tensions in its rhetoric. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detail“We/Us” vs. “Them/Others” ; The case of the “Front National” (FN) and the “Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs” (FPÖ)
Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2018, July 25)

In recent years, the “Front National” (FN) in France has claimed to be the “defender of the people” and “guarantor of their interests”. In 2017, the campaign slogan of Marine Le Pen, party leader and ... [more ▼]

In recent years, the “Front National” (FN) in France has claimed to be the “defender of the people” and “guarantor of their interests”. In 2017, the campaign slogan of Marine Le Pen, party leader and candidate in the presidential election, was “in the name of the people”. In Austria, the “Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs” (FPÖ) stood as the “voice of the oppressed majority”. The party is demanding “a direct democracy in order to let the people speak”. These elements lead us to question the notion of “the people”. How should we define “the people”? What reality does it refer to? What are the underlying political and ideological issues? Firstly, to answer this question, I aim to clarify the term “the people” in populist rhetoric. The FN and the FPÖ are often described as “far-right parties”. However, many scholars also refer to them as “populist parties”. These terms clearly need explaining. Secondly, this work will analyse the political discourse of the FN and the FPÖ. The focus will be on the political programmes and oral communication coming from their principal representatives. This analysis is discursive. It isn’t an examination of the work performed by party supporters or members (parliamentary work, action in local authorities, etc.). Apparently, the rhetoric from both parties is structured around two dichotomies: 1) the removal of social boundaries in favour of a people/elite opposition; 2) the affirmation of cultural boundaries in favour of an opposition between natives to a country and foreigners. I will explain why these notions of social and cultural boundaries have a prominent place in rhetoric in line with populist theory. The desire to suppress social boundaries, allows us to identity a first issue: sovereignty. The affirmation of cultural boundaries illustrates a second issue: unity. Finally, a third issue is transmitted through the notion of sovereignty and unity: identity. To conclude, I will return to the classification of the “Front National” and the “Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs” as “right-wing-populist” parties. I will end by answering the question: “who are ‘the people’”? This will explain why populist rhetoric responds to a feeling of unease within society and, more generally, within Western democracies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 197 (10 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailChacun son (Peuple) et la (République) sera bien gardée? ; Analyse du peuple dans les discours du Front national et de la France insoumise
Debras, François ULiege

in Revue Nouvelle (2018), 5

En France, au lendemain du premier tour des élections présidentielles de 2017, Marine Le Pen se retrouve face à Emmanuel Macron. Le front républicain a du « plomb dans l’aile ». Les consignes de vote pour ... [more ▼]

En France, au lendemain du premier tour des élections présidentielles de 2017, Marine Le Pen se retrouve face à Emmanuel Macron. Le front républicain a du « plomb dans l’aile ». Les consignes de vote pour faire barrage au Front national ne sont pas claires. Jean-Luc Mélenchon, président de la France Insoumise, refuse d’appeler à voter pour Emmanuel Macron. Ses adversaires l’accusent de faire le jeu du Front national tandis qu’il martèle qu’il ne votera pas FN. De l’autre côté du spectre politique, Marine Le Pen quant à elle, en appelle aux électeurs de la France Insoumise pour faire barrage contre le président du jeune parti La République En Marche. L’objectif de Jean-Luc Mélenchon, ce sont les législatives qui se profilent à l’horizon. Or, pour peser dans la campagne, le candidat le sait et le déclare, « il faut rester groupés ». Toute consigne de vote constituerait en effet une potentielle source de division. Mais division de qui ? Des Français ? De son électorat ? Et dans quel sens ? Marine Le Pen, présidente du Front national, et Jean-Luc Mélenchon, président de la France Insoumise, sont deux leaders populistes, qualifiés comme tels et se revendiquant tous deux comme tels. Le cœur de leur rhétorique, c’est le peuple. Nous nous posons donc la question de savoir si ce peuple renvoie aux mêmes individus. Pouvons-nous déceler des similitudes, dans le champ discursif, entre le peuple de Marine Le Pen et celui de Jean-Luc Mélenchon qui justifieraient une absence de consigne de la part du candidat la France Insoumise ? A l’inverse, sommes-nous face à un terme commun, « peuple », mais renvoyant à des corps distincts, chaque parti ne s’adressant pas « au » peuple mais à « son » peuple ? Pour répondre à cette question, nous proposons, dans un premier temps, de définir le peuple et la notion de populisme au travers de la littérature scientifique. Dans un second temps, nous étudierons les discours des représentants du Front national et de la France Insoumise tout en mobilisant les apports théoriques précédemment analysés. En guise de conclusion, nous dégagerons les similitudes et les différences relevées entre le peuple de Marine Le Pen et celui de Jean-Luc Mélenchon. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 293 (25 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailQuestions d'identité(s): conclusion
Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2018, May 04)

Pour sa onzième édition, le prochain Après-midi de la Recherche du Département de Science Politique se déroulera autour de la thématique générale suivante : « Questions d’identité(s) ». Comme pour les ... [more ▼]

Pour sa onzième édition, le prochain Après-midi de la Recherche du Département de Science Politique se déroulera autour de la thématique générale suivante : « Questions d’identité(s) ». Comme pour les précédentes éditions, la philosophie n’est pas de limiter les séminaires à une approche particulière de la Science politique. Au contraire, l’objectif de cet événement est de favoriser, autour d’un objet d’étude commun, la rencontre de diverses approches : politologiques, juridiques, sociologiques, économiques, historiques, philosophiques, anthropologiques, psychologiques, etc. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 97 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLa démocratie identitaire
Debras, François ULiege

Article for general public (2018)

L’extrême droite est-elle (aujourd’hui) démocratique ou non? Pour répondre à notre interrogation, il conviendrait, dans un premier temps, de définir les deux notions et, dans un second temps, d’évaluer ... [more ▼]

L’extrême droite est-elle (aujourd’hui) démocratique ou non? Pour répondre à notre interrogation, il conviendrait, dans un premier temps, de définir les deux notions et, dans un second temps, d’évaluer leur degré de compatibilité. Or, une telle analyse semble impossible tant les définitions sont infinies, variant selon les cultures, les époques et les individus. La démocratie est-elle une forme de gouvernement ou de société, voire une activité citoyenne ou le tout à la fois ? Les prismes d’analyse sont multiples et conditionnent les définitions. De plus, l’étude de l’extrême droite se confond souvent avec la lutte contre celle-ci . Recherche scientifique et engagement moral s’entrechoquent. Nous devons nous garder de confondre « ce qui est » avec « ce que nous pensons être ». L’extrême droite ne peut se résumer à une antithèse de nos propres croyances politiques. Dès lors, la question du caractère démocratique ou non de l’extrême droite n’aurait objectivement aucun sens. Mais, la montée électorale des partis tels que le FN et le FPÖ ainsi que la présence de ce dernier au sein du gouvernement fédéral autrichien, nous invite à nous poser une seconde question : comment l’extrême droite définit-elle la démocratie ? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 271 (21 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailExtreme right in Austria: who are "the people" (the case of the 'Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs')?
Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2018, February 23)

In recent years, the “Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs” (FPÖ) in Austria has claimed to be the “defender of the people” and “guarantor of their interests”. In 2016-2017, the FPÖ stood as the “voice of the ... [more ▼]

In recent years, the “Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs” (FPÖ) in Austria has claimed to be the “defender of the people” and “guarantor of their interests”. In 2016-2017, the FPÖ stood as the “voice of the oppressed majority”. The party is demanding “a direct democracy in order to let the people speak”. These elements lead us to question the notion of “the people”. How should we define “the people”? What reality does it refer to? What are the underlying political and ideological issues? Firstly, to answer this question, I aim to clarify the term “the people” in populist rhetoric. The FPÖ is often described as “far-right party”. However, many scholars also refer to it as “populist party”. These terms clearly need explaining. Secondly, this work will analyse the political discourse of the FPÖ. The focus will be on the political programmes and oral communication coming from their principal representatives. This analysis is discursive. It isn’t an examination of the work performed by party supporters or members (parliamentary work, action in local authorities, etc.). Apparently, the rhetoric from the FPÖ is structured around two dichotomies: 1) the removal of social boundaries in favour of a people/elite opposition; 2) the affirmation of cultural boundaries in favour of an opposition between natives to a country and foreigners. I will explain why these notions of social and cultural boundaries have a prominent place in rhetoric in line with populist theory. The desire to suppress social boundaries, allows us to identity a first issue: sovereignty. The affirmation of cultural boundaries illustrates a second issue: unity. Finally, a third issue is transmitted through the notion of sovereignty and unity: identity. To conclude, I will return to the classification of the “Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs” as “right-wing-populist” party. I will end by answering the question: “who are ‘the people’”? This will explain why populist rhetoric responds to a feeling of unease within society and, more generally, within Western democracies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 195 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailDes complots partout? Epistémologie du discours conspirationniste
Debras, François ULiege

Poster (2017, April 03)

Il n’existe pas d’un côté des « farfelus » qui voient des complots partout et de l’autre, des scientifiques rationnels qui considèrent que les complots sont des divagations. L’adhésion aux théories du ... [more ▼]

Il n’existe pas d’un côté des « farfelus » qui voient des complots partout et de l’autre, des scientifiques rationnels qui considèrent que les complots sont des divagations. L’adhésion aux théories du complot n’est pas un simple oui ou non. C’est un curseur qui indique que chacun se pose des questions et émet des doutes. De plus, l’histoire témoigne de l’existence de multiples complots bien réels que nous ne nions pas (incident de Mukden, incident du golf de Tonkin, affaire des couveuses au Koweit,…). Les théories du complot nous invitent à ne pas croire aveuglément tout ce que nous racontent les médias. Mais, à l’inverse, il ne faut pas non plus déceler des complots partout et analyser un monde « lu à l’envers » où tout ce qui est présenté comme vrai est faux et inversement. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 219 (14 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailL’initiative citoyenne européenne
Nossent, Jérôme ULiege; Debras, François ULiege

Learning material (2016)

Présentation et bilan d'application du processus européen d'initiative citoyenne.

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailEtude de cas: l'attentat au Musée juif de Bruxelles
Debras, François ULiege

in Politique, Revue de Débats (2016), 93

L’attaque soudaine d’un homme qui fait irruption dans un lieu public et tue quatre individus est angoissante. Les catastrophes, les drames et les malheurs qui frappent la société sont porteurs de ... [more ▼]

L’attaque soudaine d’un homme qui fait irruption dans un lieu public et tue quatre individus est angoissante. Les catastrophes, les drames et les malheurs qui frappent la société sont porteurs de nombreuses questions : qui, comment, pourquoi, dans quel but,… ? Les théories du complot permettent de répondre à un besoin social, celui de comprendre. Le complot est d’autant plus attirant et convaincant qu’il apporte une réponse simple, globale et dépouillée de toute subtilité. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 312 (44 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLe monopole de la légitimité démocratique
Debras, François ULiege

in Revue de la Faculté de Droit de l'Université de Liège (2015), 2

Loin d’être le résultat de facteurs externes, la contestation du régime démocratique semble être avant tout le résultat d’une critique inhérente au système. Différents indicateurs mesurables viennent ... [more ▼]

Loin d’être le résultat de facteurs externes, la contestation du régime démocratique semble être avant tout le résultat d’une critique inhérente au système. Différents indicateurs mesurables viennent étayer ce que certains auteurs qualifient de « syndrome de fatigue démocratique » ou encore de « corruption du régime constitutionnel pluraliste », tels que l’augmentation de l’abstentionnisme durant les périodes électorales, une volatilité et une instabilité croissante de l’électorat et une baisse des adhésions aux organisations collectives. Fait tout aussi significatif, il semblerait que les jeunes démocraties dans les pays de l’ex-Union soviétique, d’Asie ou d’Amérique latine n’échappent pas non plus à ces phénomènes. Cette situation illustre-t-elle une perte de légitimité démocratique, une crise démocratique ou ne correspond-elle pas plutôt à une volonté citoyenne de transformer nos démocraties en élargissant et en approfondissant certaines de ses dynamiques et procédures qui lui sont propres ? Pour répondre à cette question, nous proposons de nous concentrer sur trois éléments distincts, mais étroitement liés au sein de nos démocraties européennes au XXIe siècle : le lien représentant/représenté (la représentation), la reconnaissance des libertés individuelles vis-à-vis de l’organisation collective de la société (les citoyens) et l’action du pouvoir étatique (l’État). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 638 (61 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailDémocratie et populisme: quelle réalité pour quelle légitimité?
Biard, Benjamin; Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2015, May 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 148 (27 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailCritique et légitimité des démocraties occidentales contemporaines
Debras, François ULiege

Article for general public (2015)

Depuis une vingtaine d’années, la littérature scientifique remettant en cause la démocratie représentative n’a cessé de proliférer : crise de la représentation, crise de la citoyenneté, corruption et ... [more ▼]

Depuis une vingtaine d’années, la littérature scientifique remettant en cause la démocratie représentative n’a cessé de proliférer : crise de la représentation, crise de la citoyenneté, corruption et aliénation du régime constitutionnel pluraliste, … Cette situation traduit-elle une mise à mal de la légitimité démocratique, une crise de la démocratie ou constitue-t-elle plutôt une remise en cause de ses dynamiques et procédures sans pour autant s’opposer à ses fondements, une volonté de transformer nos démocraties? Pour répondre à cette question, nous proposons de nous concentrer sur trois éléments distincts mais étroitement liés au sein de nos démocraties européennes au 21e siècle: le lien représentant-représenté (la représentation), la reconnaissance des libertés individuelles vis-à-vis de l’organisation collective de la société (les individus) et l’action du pouvoir étatique (l’Etat). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 245 (45 ULiège)