Publications of François Debras
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailBack to the Future: the Democracy of Yesterday and Tomorrow in the Speeches of the Rassemblement National and the Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs
Debras, François ULiege

in Journal of Contemporary European Studies (in press)

In France, the Rassemblement National and, in Austria, the Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs aim to “recover”, “restore” or “protect” democracy. In this article, I will study their use of the term ... [more ▼]

In France, the Rassemblement National and, in Austria, the Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs aim to “recover”, “restore” or “protect” democracy. In this article, I will study their use of the term “democracy” by focusing on its temporal dimension. Their discourse tells a story, that of a glorious past which should be revived. Adopting a critical discourse analysis approach, I will answer the following questions: what kind of temporality is conveyed by the term “democracy”?, and, if “democracy” is perceived as a “lost world”, then what vision do those politicians who support the ideology of the two political parties have of tomorrow’s “democracy”? I would maintain that whilst these parties present themselves as agents of a democratic renewal, their vision of “democracy” remains traditional, i.e. essentially representative and vertical. The term “direct democracy” is limited to particular subjects (the EU, immigration, international agreements) and these parties are critical of electoral reforms or new forms of participation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 ULiège)
See detailThe European Union in the nationalist discourses: between "national identity” and “fortress Europe"?
Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2021, September 16)

The literature considers that right-wing populist parties (RWPP) are opposed to democracy (against its institutions or values). Nevertheless, it is undeniable that RWPP claim, in their speeches, the term ... [more ▼]

The literature considers that right-wing populist parties (RWPP) are opposed to democracy (against its institutions or values). Nevertheless, it is undeniable that RWPP claim, in their speeches, the term “democracy”. I propose to study its meaning and mobilization. In more detail, the term “democracy” is mainly used to criticise the European Union (EU). I observe 2 types of criticism: existential and functional. Some parties such as the RN in France are opposed to the EU. It would not be democratic but authoritarian. Only the national framework dominates. On the other hand, other parties such as the FPÖ in Austria and the AfD in Germany don’t want to leave the EU. The criticism is more functional, they want to change it. Democracy is a central value of Europe that should be protected. “Fortress Europe” is thus mobilised to fight against immigration and European identity is defined against “Islam”. I propose to focus on the ideological production of 3 parties: RN, FPÖ, AfD. Discourse is mobilized here as a tool. In other words, through different modes of communication, political actors build and/or mobilize ideologies, values and positions that they promote or reject. Speeches are thus materials from which we aim to identify representations, values, intentions and even acts of social creation. For this research, I will combine a content analysis (co-occurrence of the term democracy, identity and UE) and a critical discourse analysis (how democracy is presented in relation to the concept of European identity). I will explain how, in right-wing populist discourse, “democracy” is oriented to serve an ideology. It is mobilised either to fight against the EU from a nationalist perspective or against immigration from an identity perspective. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailJe ne suis pas complotiste mais…
Debras, François ULiege

Article for general public (2021)

Pourquoi nous sommes sensibles aux théories du complot? Comment pouvons-nous porter un regard critique sur la formation de notre jugement ? Pour cela, interrogeons trois biais cognitifs: le biais de ... [more ▼]

Pourquoi nous sommes sensibles aux théories du complot? Comment pouvons-nous porter un regard critique sur la formation de notre jugement ? Pour cela, interrogeons trois biais cognitifs: le biais de confirmation, le biais de conjonction et le biais d'intentionnalité. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLe chant des sirènes: : quand l’extrême droite parle de démocratie. Analyse critique des discours du Rassemblement National (RN) en France, du Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs (FPÖ) en Autriche et de l’Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) en Allemagne
Debras, François ULiege

Doctoral thesis (2021)

Seen as opposed to the institutions or values of democracy, far-right political parties portray themselves as the promoters and defenders of democracy against a range of internal and external enemies ... [more ▼]

Seen as opposed to the institutions or values of democracy, far-right political parties portray themselves as the promoters and defenders of democracy against a range of internal and external enemies. Some authors argue that recourse to the term ‘democracy' in their discourse is essentially symbolic and linked to a strategy of 'de-demonisation' or 'normalisation'. I question this claim by asking myself how and why far-right parties use the term 'democracy' in their discourse. To do so, I have studied the discourse of three political parties, the Rassemblement National (RN) in France, the Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs (FPÖ) in Austria and the Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) in Germany. I apply a critical discourse analysis in three steps : lexicometric analysis, semantic and rhetorical analysis and socio-ideological analysis. In this way, I highlight the different functions of the term 'democracy' while also underlining tensions in the discourses of these parties. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (8 ULiège)
See detail‘National’ and ‘Ethnic’ Democracy: Ideal and Discursive Arguments in Right-Wing Populist Discourses
Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2021, July 12)

The literature considers that right-wing populism is opposed to democracy (against its institutions or values). Nevertheless, it seems undeniable to me that right-wing populist parties claim, in their ... [more ▼]

The literature considers that right-wing populism is opposed to democracy (against its institutions or values). Nevertheless, it seems undeniable to me that right-wing populist parties claim, in their speeches, the notion of "democracy". I propose to study its meaning and mobilization. In more detail, I believe that the definitions of the term "democracy" in the discourse of right-wing populist parties is mainly oriented around a nationalist and chauvinist ideology. Right-wing populist parties use the notion of democracy differently depending on the context of enunciation, i.e. according to types of production (speeches, press releases, interventions,…), audiences (journalists, voters, politicians,…) and periods (elections, Brexit, political scandals,...). I also observe that, in their speeches, the notion of democracy is ideologically structured. It is not neutral. It refers mainly to nationalism, chauvinism, inequality,... So I ask myself the following question: how does the nationalist ideology structure the notion of democracy in right-wing populist discourses? To answer this question, I propose to focus on the ideological production of 2 parties (RN, FPÖ) to analyse mainly their political programmes, speeches and press releases. Discourse is mobilized here as a tool, a way of accessing intentions, strategies, ideas, opinions or feelings. In other words, through different modes of communication, political actors build and/or mobilize ideologies, values, customs and positions that they promote or reject. Speeches are thus materials from which I aim to identify representations, values, intentions and even acts of social creation. For this research, I will combine a content analysis (co-occurrence of the term democracy and the national ideal) and a critical discourse analysis (how nationalism structures the representation and the mobilization of the notion of democracy). More generally, I will also explain to what extent nationalist ideology varies according to the parties (ethnic nationalism and state nationalism), against whom the notions of "national democracy" or "ethnic democracy" are mobilized (immigration, Islam, Europe,...), who they wishe to protect (a people specifically defines) and how the nationalist and ethnic rhetoric is structured (discursive elements, dichotomies, semantic environment,...). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (2 ULiège)
See detailLes nouveaux habits de la "bête": rencontre avec François Debras et Olivier Starquit
Debras, François ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2021)

Partout, l’extrême droite resurgit et séduit de nouveaux publics. Pourquoi ? Et surtout, comment ? La « bête » aurait-elle mué ? Se serait-elle offert des habits plus « corrects » ? Les nouvelles ... [more ▼]

Partout, l’extrême droite resurgit et séduit de nouveaux publics. Pourquoi ? Et surtout, comment ? La « bête » aurait-elle mué ? Se serait-elle offert des habits plus « corrects » ? Les nouvelles technologies ont-elles une part de responsabilité dans ce retour ? Sont-elles les seules à blâmer ? Cette rencontre sera l’occasion de faire un état des lieux et de proposer des pistes de solutions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (2 ULiège)
See detail"National democracy": ideal and discursive arguments in right-wing populist discourses
Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2021, April 06)

The literature considers that right-wing populist parties (RWPP) are opposed to democracy (against institutions or values). Nevertheless, RWPP claim, in their speeches, the term "democracy". I propose to ... [more ▼]

The literature considers that right-wing populist parties (RWPP) are opposed to democracy (against institutions or values). Nevertheless, RWPP claim, in their speeches, the term "democracy". I propose to study its meaning and mobilization. RWPP use “democracy” differently depending on the context of enunciation (production, audiences and periods). I also observe that the term is ideologically structured. It refers mainly to nationalism, chauvinism and inequality. So I ask myself: how does the nationalist ideology structure the term “democracy” in these discourses? I propose to focus on the ideological production of three European parties (RN-France, FPÖ-Austria, AfD-Germany). Through different modes of communication, political actors build mobilize ideologies, values and positions that they promote or reject. Speeches are thus materials from which we aim to identify representations and acts of social creation. I will combine a content analysis (co-occurrence of the term “democracy”) and a critical discourse analysis (how nationalism structures the term “democracy”). More generally, I will also explain to what extent nationalist ideology varies according to parties (ethnic or state nationalism), against whom the term "democracy" is mobilized (immigration, Islam, Europe,...), who it wishes to protect (people specifically defines) and how it is structured (discursive elements, dichotomies, semantic environment). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (3 ULiège)
See detailAnalyse des discours des partis d'extrême droite en Europe
Debras, François ULiege

Scientific conference (2021, March 02)

Dans un premier temps, la séance définit l'extrême droite, les formations politiques et son corpus idéologique et, dans un second temps, analyse de manière critique, avec des exemples, des discours au ... [more ▼]

Dans un premier temps, la séance définit l'extrême droite, les formations politiques et son corpus idéologique et, dans un second temps, analyse de manière critique, avec des exemples, des discours au travers de différents outils et différentes méthodes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (5 ULiège)
See detailLes partis populistes en quête de légitimité; Analyse des discours du Parti du Travail de Belgique et du Parti Populaire belge
Biard, Benjamin; Bottin, Jehan; Debras, François ULiege

in Damay, Ludivine; Jacquet, Vincent (Eds.) Les transformations de la légitimité démocratique; Idéaux, revendications et perceptions (2021)

Le populisme est un concept aux multiples usages qui fait l’objet de nombreux débats. Classiquement, les termes « populisme » et « populiste » sont utilisés pour critiquer un adversaire politique. Outre ... [more ▼]

Le populisme est un concept aux multiples usages qui fait l’objet de nombreux débats. Classiquement, les termes « populisme » et « populiste » sont utilisés pour critiquer un adversaire politique. Outre le champ politique, la littérature scientifique tente de mobiliser la notion à des fins de classification, visant à une meilleure compréhension de phénomènes sociopolitiques. Au-delà de la question de l’étiquette « populiste » mobilisées par les acteurs politiques et des tentatives de définition de la notion, la littérature propose une définition minimale, présentant le populisme comme un style de communication politique construit sur une opposition fondamentale entre, d’un côté, le peuple et, de l’autre, les élites. Les partis adoptant un style de communication populiste – dits partis populistes – sont considérés dans la littérature comme une menace pour la démocratie et pour les principes libéraux qui la caractérisent. En conséquence, les partis dits « traditionnels » adoptent à leur égard des mesures qui peuvent être exclusives ou inclusives. Afin d’accéder au pouvoir malgré ces difficultés qu’ils éprouvent, les partis populistes ambitionnent de renforcer leur légitimité vis-à-vis des partis traditionnels mais également vis-à-vis de l’électorat. La manière dont les partis populistes construisent cette légitimité reste une question peu étudiée de manière empirique en science politique. Pour cette raison, nous proposons d’étudier les discours de ces partis politiques afin de mieux comprendre comment s’articule leur rhétorique vis-à-vis des autres formations politiques mais également vis-à-vis des électeurs. Pour ce faire, nous proposons, dans un premier temps, de définir la notion de populisme et de mettre au jour la structure rhétorique employée par les formations populistes. Ensuite, nous définirons la notion de légitimité, particulièrement au regard de la notion de populisme. La section méthodologique présentera ensuite la sélection des cas opérée dans le cadre de ce chapitre, à savoir le Parti du Travail de Belgique (PTB) et le Parti populaire belge (PP), ainsi que la manière dont les données sont collectées puis analysées. L’analyse des discours sera opérée dans un quatrième temps. Alors que les cas à l’étude reposent sur des idéologies fondamentalement différentes, l’objectif de la recherche est de repérer les différences mais aussi les similitudes dans la manière de construire leur légitimité. Enfin, nous tenterons de conclure en répondant à la question qui structure ce chapitre : quelles sont les stratégies discursives employées par les deux formations populistes sélectionnées pour renforcer leur légitimité ? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 116 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailThe Sirens' Song: Use of the Term "Democracy" in the Speeches of the RN, the FPÖ and the AfD
Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2021, February 25)

Historically, the literature has defined the “far right”, the “radical right” or “right-wing populism” (hereafter RWP) as political organizations that are opposed to democracy. Depending on the author ... [more ▼]

Historically, the literature has defined the “far right”, the “radical right” or “right-wing populism” (hereafter RWP) as political organizations that are opposed to democracy. Depending on the author considered, this opposition is institutional (RWP wants to overthrow democratic institutions) or valorical (RWP would be incompatible with a democratic society). However, if we question the political field, RWP in its speech presents itself as the defender of democracy. Thus, in France, the Rassemblement National (RN), in Austria, the Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs (FPÖ) and, in Germany, the Alternative für Deutschland (AfD), aim to “recover”, “restore”, or “protect” democracy. Through this “democratic rhetoric”, the literature argues that this is essentially a symbolic discourse rooted in a strategy of “normalization” of the parties to make them respectable in the eyes of the voter. I aim to further refine this assumption by asking the question: in the speeches of these parties, is “democracy” only a symbolic term, a strategic argument or is “democracy” also ideologically loaded? In other words, could it be argued that “democracy”, in populist discourse, corresponds to a symbolic argument as well as a very specific ideological lexis? To answer this question, I first propose to concentre on the relationship between RWP and democracy as studied in the literature. Second, I will study the term “democracy” in RN, FPÖ and AfD discourses by carrying out a lexicometric analysis before combining it with a critical discourse analysis, from a more qualitative perspective. The objective is to question the context of the enunciation of the term “democracy”. “Discourse” is here defined as the addition of a text and its context structured by an enunciation. So discourse must be studied as a tool or as a mode of access to intentions, strategies or ideologies. For this presentation, I decided to study all the discourses of these parties available on their websites between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2018. Third, I will deal with different functions of the term “democracy” in the discourse (emotional, symbolic, rhetorical, legitimacy and ideological function) while highlighting some of the tensions in its rhetoric. The case of the FPÖ allows me to compare the speeches of a party that is a member of the opposition and then a member of the government. Finally, I will conclude my presentation by answering my research question and relate it to the notion of illiberal an identity democracy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (3 ULiège)
See detailFunctions of the Word “Democracy” in Right-Wing Populist Discourses; the Case of the Rassemblement National and the Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs
Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2021, January 15)

Historically, the literature has defined the “far right”, the “radical right” or “right-wing populism” (hereafter RWP) as political organizations that are opposed to democracy. Depending on the author ... [more ▼]

Historically, the literature has defined the “far right”, the “radical right” or “right-wing populism” (hereafter RWP) as political organizations that are opposed to democracy. Depending on the author considered, this opposition is institutional or valorical. However, if we question the political field, RWP in its speech presents itself as the defender of democracy. Thus, in France, the Rassemblement National (RN) andin Austria, the Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs aim to “recover”, “restore”, or “protect” democracy. Through this “democratic rhetoric”, the literature argues that this is essentially a symbolic discourse rooted in a strategy of “normalization” of the parties to make them respectable in the eyes of the voter. I aim to further refine this assumption by asking the question: in the speech of these parties, is “democracy” only a symbolic term, a strategic argument or is “democracy” also ideologically loaded? In other words, could it be argued that “democracy”, in populist discourse, corresponds to a symbolic argument as well as a very specific ideological lexis? I will deal with different functions of the term “democracy” in the discourse (rhetorical function ; emotional function ; ideological function) while highlighting some of the tensions in its rhetoric. The case of the FPÖ allows me to compare the speeches of a party that is a member of the opposition and then a member of the government. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (3 ULiège)
See detailPeuple et identité dans les discours du Rassemblement National et du Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs
Debras, François ULiege

in Debras, François; Nossent, Jérôme (Eds.) Questions d'Identités; Approches multidisciplinaires (2021)

Ces dernières années, le Rassemblement National (RN) s’est présenté comme le « défenseur du peuple » et le « garant de ses intérêts » . En 2017, le slogan de Marine Le Pen, présidente du parti et ... [more ▼]

Ces dernières années, le Rassemblement National (RN) s’est présenté comme le « défenseur du peuple » et le « garant de ses intérêts » . En 2017, le slogan de Marine Le Pen, présidente du parti et candidate à l'élection présidentielle, était « Au nom du peuple » . La même année, en Autriche, le Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs (FPÖ) considérait que le « droit émane du peuple » et que donc « c’est au peuple de décider » . Depuis plusieurs années, le parti exige « une démocratie directe pour permettre au peuple de s'exprimer » . Ces éléments nous amènent à nous interroger sur la notion de « peuple » telle que véhiculée par ces deux partis. Comment définissent-ils le « peuple » ? Quels sont les éléments politiques, idéologiques mais aussi identitaires sous-jacents ? Pour répondre à cette question, nous examinerons tout d’abord le terme « peuple » au regard de la littérature étudiant le phénomène populiste. Le RN et le FPÖ sont souvent décrits comme des partis d’extrême droite mais les chercheurs les considèrent également comme des « partis populistes de droite ». Cette notion doit être expliquée. Ensuite, nous analyserons la mobilisation du terme « peuple » dans le discours politique du RN et du FPÖ. L'accent sera mis sur les productions idéologiques (discours, conférences de presse, communiqués, projets de loi,…) de leurs principaux représentants durant la période 2015-2018. Cette analyse est discursive et ne porte pas sur les actions des partisans, le travail parlementaire, les politiques publiques mises en place au sein des autorités locales,... Pour conclure, nous reviendrons sur la classification du RN et du FPÖ en tant que partis populistes de droite et nous terminerons en répondant à la question suivante : quelle est l’identité du peuple français et autrichien dans la rhétorique du Rassemblement national et du Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 117 (6 ULiège)
See detailIntroduction - Penser l'identité
Debras, François ULiege; Nossent, Jérôme ULiege

in Debras, François; Nossent, Jérôme (Eds.) Questions d'Identités; Approches multidisciplinaires (2021)

Sur base de contributions d’auteurs provenant de divers horizons des sciences humaines, nous proposons de questionner la notion d’identité à l’appui des multiples cas d’études spécifiques. Notre projet ... [more ▼]

Sur base de contributions d’auteurs provenant de divers horizons des sciences humaines, nous proposons de questionner la notion d’identité à l’appui des multiples cas d’études spécifiques. Notre projet d’ouvrage s’articule autour d’un colloque international du même nom organisé dans le cadre des Après-Midi de la Recherche du Département de Science politique de l’Université de Liège (ULiège), le 4 mai 2018. L’identité en tant que construit social, psychologique, étatique, etc. fait l’objet d’approches variées. En effet, elle est appréhendée au travers d’une pluralité de disciplines, ces dernières mettant en exergue sa complexité, mais contribuant surtout à une meilleure connaissance de cet objet et des phénomènes qu’il sous-tend. L’ambition du présent ouvrage vise à l’explicitation de certaines de ces conceptions. Il s’agit de montrer la façon dont l’identité est conçue par différentes disciplines scientifiques que sont la science politique, le droit, la psychologie et l’histoire. L’intérêt principal de la démarche, hors l’interdisciplinarité qui la sous-tend, réside dans la présentation de cas d’études spécifiques étudiés par le prisme identitaire. Il ne s’agit dès lors pas seulement de théoriser et montrer, mais surtout de démontrer. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (10 ULiège)
See detailQuestions d'Identités; Approches multidisciplinaires
Debras, François ULiege; Nossent, Jérôme ULiege

Book published by Presses Universitaires de Liège (2021)

Sur une pièce d’identité, nous retrouvons notre nom, prénom, date de naissance, sexe, photographie, signature, adresse, dans certains cas, ainsi que différents éléments reconnus par une administration ... [more ▼]

Sur une pièce d’identité, nous retrouvons notre nom, prénom, date de naissance, sexe, photographie, signature, adresse, dans certains cas, ainsi que différents éléments reconnus par une administration permettant de nous définir et de nous distinguer. « Mon identité » me rend unique, elle signifie que personne ne m’est identique. Mais l’identité, dans une approche non juridique, renvoie également à différentes formes d’identification qui dépendent à la fois de facteurs objectifs (langue, culture, milieu social ou économique, traits physiques) et subjectifs (sensibilités politiques ou philosophiques). L’identité n’a pas nécessairement besoin d’être reconnue ou officialisée, elle dépend d’un attachement émotionnel. Ce « sentiment d’appartenance » peut très bien entrer en contradiction avec des éléments factuels. À titre d’exemple, un individu peut s’identifier « à gauche » sans pour autant que cela soit lié à une appartenance ou non à une catégorie socio-économique. Pour rompre avec toute approche essentialiste, l’identité est une notion complexe et vide mais pas pour autant vide de sens. En d’autres mots, l’identité n’est pas un état ni un objet : elle demeure fondamentalement virtuelle. Seuls ses effets sont tangibles : guerres, révolutions, naissance d’une nation, mais également luttes en faveur de l’élargissement des droits, politiques migratoires, productions locales, etc. Malgré son caractère non-matériel, l’identité n’en demeure donc pas moins une réalité. Elle se créé, elle évolue et elle définit un ensemble de comportements, d’opinions et de valeurs tant individuels que collectifs pouvant être les moteurs de revendications religieuses, territoriales, ethniques, sociologiques, voire biologiques. Si l’identité est un élément central de socialisation et de construction de l’individu ou de la collectivité, elle est également un vecteur de division. Car si l’identité définit, comme toute définition, elle induit nécessairement une exclusion. Tout processus de définition entraine nécessairement le rejet de ce qu’il ne recouvre pas. À l’extrême, une identité peut être vidée de tout contenu positif et s’articuler au travers d’une pure opposition. « Je » ne renvoie plus à « moi » mais à ce que les « autres » ne sont pas. Cette forme d’ « identité négative » se définit « contre » les autres identités en insistant sur la différence, la frontière et le rejet. L’identité est alors un moteur de conflits et d’édification de clivages (nationaux–non-nationaux, francophones-néerlandophones, chrétiens-musulmans, féministes-machistes, local-global, etc.), voire, dans certains cas, de ségrégation et de discriminations (racisme, culturalisme, protectionnisme, etc.). Les principales luttes sociales et politiques, nationales et internationales de ces dernières années illustrent, pour la plupart, ces différentes problématiques identitaires entre reconnaissance officielle et personnelle, entre valeurs positives et négatives, c’est-à-dire constituant des formes d’intégration et/ou d’exclusion : les mouvements indépendantistes catalans, écossais, lombards, le Brexit, les politiques anti-migratoires proposées par les partis d’extrême droite (mais pas uniquement), les politiques mémorielles en matière d’histoire et de transmission « d’une Histoire », les revendications religieuses et le fameux « choc des civilisations », le protectionnisme d’une certaine Europe blanche et catholique opposée à l’Islam, la construction européenne, la reconnaissance des minorités, l’inscription de nouveaux droits pour les femmes ou les homosexuels, etc. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 111 (19 ULiège)
See detailMédias, Émotions et Politiques (conclusion)
Debras, François ULiege; Nossent, Jérôme ULiege

Conference (2020, October 09)

Dans le cadre de leur 13e édition, les Après-midi de Recherche du Département de Science politique se joignent au Département de Médias, Culture et Communication de l’Université de Liège pour ... [more ▼]

Dans le cadre de leur 13e édition, les Après-midi de Recherche du Département de Science politique se joignent au Département de Médias, Culture et Communication de l’Université de Liège pour l’organisation d’un colloque ayant pour thème : « Médias, émotions et politiques ». Les rapports étroits entre médias et politiques connaissent de multiples configurations et les exemples ne manquent pas : considérons le rôle joué par la médiatisation d’un problème social, et ainsi à son inscription à l’agenda politique. Pensons aux liaisons, maintes fois exposées, entretenues par certains groupes ou hommes politiques avec les médias, ou à l’action politique de certains médias notamment dans la dénonciation de scandales à portée politique, voire à l’engagement en politique de nombreux journalistes, comme candidat ou membre d’un cabinet en qualité de professionnel de la communication. Les médias, comme l’indique leur étymologie, font office d’intermédiaires entre les citoyens, les collectifs et les dirigeants. Ils relayent les actions, positions et revendications de chacun. Les liens entre médias et politiques sont ainsi des objets d’étude de longue date (Emeri 1976, Wolton 1989). Un tiers élément peut être ajouté à ce binôme : le rôle joué par les émotions. Chaque partie en est à la fois dépendant, mais également utilisateur. Le recours aux émotions, tant par le politique que par les médias a toujours été présent, de même que l’influence que celles-ci sont susceptibles de jouer sur leur action. Les prédictions apocalyptiques ou les promesses de rédemption auxquelles nous sommes confrontés depuis plusieurs décennies en donnent de multiples exemples tels que le changement climatique, disparitions des espèces animales et donc de l’humanité, mais aussi crise économique, faillite du système financier et mort de la démocratie. Tout débat semble désormais frappé du sceau de l’« émocratie ». Figurant parmi l’arsenal de l’orateur, selon Aristote, le recours aux émotions (pathos) est une des trois « preuves inhérentes au discours » (avec le logos et l’ethos). Pourtant, les questions émotionnelles ne suscitèrent pas un intérêt systématique selon les époques et les disciplines. Les émotions furent ainsi longtemps considérées comme irrationnelles (Weber 1978) et marginalisées par les études classiques de Science Politique, jusqu’à un passé récent. Le rôle accordé aux émotions croît depuis ainsi plusieurs années en sciences humaines et sociales. Le « tournant émotionnel » désigne ainsi le regain d’intérêt pour l’étude des émotions tant comme réponses à des évènements externes qu’en tant que sources de changements (Clément & Sagar 2018, Rosenwein 2002). Afin de mieux comprendre les relations qui s’établissent entre « Médias, émotions et politiques », dans le cadre de leur treizième édition, les Après-midi de Recherche du Département de Science politique s’associent au Département de Médias, Culture, Communication de l’Université de Liège pour l'organisation d'un colloque international, aux contributions tant théoriques qu’empiriques, sur la thématique « Médias, émotions et politiques », le tout marqué du sceau de l’interdisciplinarité. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailThe Sirens’ Song: When Right-Wing Populism Deals with “Democracy”. The Case of the RN in France and FPÖ in Austria
Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2020, September 09)

A significant part of the literature considers that right-wing populist parties are anti-democratic. According to some authors, these parties are opposed to democratic institutions. And for other authors ... [more ▼]

A significant part of the literature considers that right-wing populist parties are anti-democratic. According to some authors, these parties are opposed to democratic institutions. And for other authors, right-wing populism respects electoral rules, respects the institutional game but is opposed to the values of democracy. On the other hand, in the political field, right-wing populist parties consider themselves to be democratic parties. They present themselves as the defenders of the people, the promoters of a true democracy. Against the European Union, against other political parties, against immigration, against Islam etc I therefore think it could be interesting to ask the following questions: 1) How does right-wing populism define democracy? 2) Why does right-wing populism mobilize democracy in its speeches? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailFunctions of the Word “Democracy” in Right-Wing Populist Discourses; the Case of the Rassemblement National in France
Debras, François ULiege

Conference (2020, August 28)

The Rassemblement National underlines that democracy is a fundamental principle of the French Republic. The literature argues that this is a symbolic discourse rooted in a strategy of “normalization”. I ... [more ▼]

The Rassemblement National underlines that democracy is a fundamental principle of the French Republic. The literature argues that this is a symbolic discourse rooted in a strategy of “normalization”. I aim to further revise this assumption by asking the question: is “democracy” only a symbolic term, a strategic argument or - and this is the hypothesis that I intend to demonstrate - is the word “democracy” also ideologically loaded? In other words, it be argued that “democracy”, in populist discourse, corresponds to a symbolic argument as well as a very specific ideological corpus? I will study the term “democracy” by carrying out a lexicometric analysis before combining it with a critical discourse analysis. I will then deal with different functions of the term “democracy” while highlighting some of the tensions in its rhetoric. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (5 ULiège)
See detailAnalyse des discours: Approche quantitative et qualitative, quelles méthodologies pour quels résultats?
Debras, François ULiege

Scientific conference (2020, March 06)

Présentation des différents aspects théoriques, courants, écoles et outils de l’analyse des discours avec, à l’appui, des exemples issus des discours du Rassemblement National (RN) en France et du ... [more ▼]

Présentation des différents aspects théoriques, courants, écoles et outils de l’analyse des discours avec, à l’appui, des exemples issus des discours du Rassemblement National (RN) en France et du Freiheitliche Partei Österreichs (FPÖ) en Autriche. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (9 ULiège)
See detailLes mots de l'extrême droite
Debras, François ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2020)

Après une période de dédiabolisation et grâce à une base électorale croissante, de plus en plus de partis d'extrême droite européens se revendiquent aujourd'hui comme démocratiques. En écartant de la ... [more ▼]

Après une période de dédiabolisation et grâce à une base électorale croissante, de plus en plus de partis d'extrême droite européens se revendiquent aujourd'hui comme démocratiques. En écartant de la scène politique et médiatique leurs membres les plus violents, en respectant les procédures électorales et en proposant des programmes alternatifs vis-à-vis des partis traditionnels, les organisations d'extrême droite s'intégreraient durablement au sein de nos systèmes politiques jusqu'à se présenter, dans certains pays, comme les véritables représentants du peuple, les défenseurs des libertés individuelles et les promoteurs d'une véritable démocratie loin des bureaucrates et technocrates de Bruxelles, loin des élites politiques et économiques qui ont confisqué le pouvoir au citoyens. Liberté d'expression, égalité homme-femme, laïcité, référendum, souveraineté populaire... Autant de notions, autant de valeurs, autant de principes mobilisés aujourd'hui dans les discours de l'extrême droite. Entre opposition et récupération, quels sont donc les liens qu'entretiennent les partis d'extrême droite avec ces termes? Comment sont-ils utilisés? A quels fins sont-ils employés? Quelles idéologies pouvons nous trouver "derrières" les mots? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (9 ULiège)
See detailDes complots partout?!
Debras, François ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2020)

Il n’existe pas d’un côté des « farfelus » qui voient des complots partout et de l’autre, des scientifiques rationnels qui considèrent que les complots sont des divagations. L’adhésion aux théories du ... [more ▼]

Il n’existe pas d’un côté des « farfelus » qui voient des complots partout et de l’autre, des scientifiques rationnels qui considèrent que les complots sont des divagations. L’adhésion aux théories du complot n’est pas un simple oui ou non. C’est un curseur qui indique que chacun se pose des questions. Les théories du complot nous invitent à ne pas croire aveuglément tout ce que nous racontent les médias. A l’inverse, il ne faut pas non plus déceler des complots partout et croire que tout ce qui est présenté comme vrai est faux et inversement. Au travers d’exemples, nous proposons d’expliquer comment se structurent les théories du complot et comment elles répondent à un besoin social, celui de « comprendre ». Méfions-nous toutefois des preuves uniques, des analyses globales et des clés qui ouvrent toutes les portes… [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 ULiège)