Publications of Catherine Barsics
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See detailReduced specificity and enhanced subjective experience of future thinking in ageing: The influence of avoidance and emotion-regulation strategies
Jumentier, Sabrina; Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Van der Linden, Martial ULiege

in Memory (2018), 26(1), 59-73

Future thinking in older adults is characterised by a lack of specificity of imagined events and by an equal or even higher subjective experience, compared to younger adults. We considered whether this ... [more ▼]

Future thinking in older adults is characterised by a lack of specificity of imagined events and by an equal or even higher subjective experience, compared to younger adults. We considered whether this lack of specificity stemmed partly from the avoidance of a somewhat disturbing future and then examined the extent to which certain types of emotion-regulation strategies, namely positive reappraisal and positive refocusing, contributed to the subjective experience of future thinking. Middle-aged and older adults completed an adapted version of the AMT, in which temporal distance and cue word valence were manipulated, thus resulting in future conditions assumed to represent varying degrees of discomfort. Results indicate that distant future and negative cues restricted both the specificity and the subjective experience of future thinking. In addition, the use of avoidance strategies predicted the nature of future thoughts in the context of a supposed uncomfortable future (i.e., a distant future induced by negative cues), although it followed quite different age-related patterns. Together with the findings that positive reappraisal and positive refocusing (to a lesser extent) contributed to the subjective experience of future thinking, this study indicates that how individuals imagine their personal future also relies on affect- and emotion-regulation strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailProcrastination as a self-regulation failure: The role of impulsivity and intrusive thoughts
Rebetez, Marie; Rochat, Lucien; Barsics, Catherine ULiege et al

in Psychological Reports (2018), 121(1), 26-41

Procrastination has been described as the quintessence of self-regulatory failure. This study examines the relationships between this self-regulatory failure and other manifestations of self-regulation ... [more ▼]

Procrastination has been described as the quintessence of self-regulatory failure. This study examines the relationships between this self-regulatory failure and other manifestations of self-regulation problems, namely impulsivity and intrusive thoughts. One hundred and forty-one participants completed questionnaires assessing procrastination, impulsivity (in particular, the urgency and lack of perseverance dimensions), and intrusive thoughts (i.e., rumination and daydreaming). Main results show that urgency mediated the association between rumination and procrastination, whereas rumination did not mediate the relation between urgency and procrastination. Lack of perseverance mediated the association between daydreaming and procrastination, and daydreaming mediated the relation between lack of perseverance and procrastination. This study highlights the role of impulsivity and intrusive thoughts in procrastination, specifies the links between these self-regulation problems, and provides insights into their (potential) underlying mechanisms. It also opens interesting prospects for management strategies for implementing targeted psychological interventions to reduce impulsive manifestations and/or thought control difficulties accompanying procrastination. [less ▲]

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See detailL’Échelle de Perspective Temporelle Équilibrée : Version française
Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Rebetez, Marie; Rochat, Lucien et al

in Revue Francophone de Clinique Comportementale et Cognitive (2017), XXII(1), 18-22

La Perspective Temporelle Equilibrée fait référence à une disposition individuelle caractérisée par le fait de se projeter mentalement dans le futur et dans le passé de manière positive et fréquente. Nous ... [more ▼]

La Perspective Temporelle Equilibrée fait référence à une disposition individuelle caractérisée par le fait de se projeter mentalement dans le futur et dans le passé de manière positive et fréquente. Nous avons développé la version française d’une échelle initialement conçue en anglais, évaluant cette orientation temporelle : la “Balanced Time Perspective Scale” (Webster, 2011). Une étude en ligne a permis de recueillir les données de 622 participants francophones issus de la population générale (Barsics et al., 2017). Les résultats indiquent que la version française réplique la structure en deux facteurs du questionnaire original et plaident en faveur d’une bonne validité de construit. De surcroît, les résultats montrent qu’une tendance importante à se projeter mentalement dans le futur et dans le passé de manière positive et fréquente est associée à la réévaluation cognitive, une stratégie de régulation émotionnelle. En somme, ce questionnaire permet d’évaluer la perspective temporelle, qui est ici envisagée en tant qu’importante ressource pour le Self, et ce, en étroite relation avec les capacités de régulation émotionnelle. [less ▲]

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See detailA French version of the Balanced Time Perspective Scale: Factor structure and relation to cognitive reappraisal.
Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Rebetez, Marie; Rochat, Lucien et al

in Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science (2017), 49(1), 51-57

A frequent and equal tendency to think positively about one’s past and future has been conceptualised as a balanced time perspective (TP). Such a dispositional temporal orientation has been associated ... [more ▼]

A frequent and equal tendency to think positively about one’s past and future has been conceptualised as a balanced time perspective (TP). Such a dispositional temporal orientation has been associated with higher life satisfaction and happiness. The aim of the present study was to develop and to validate a French version of the Balanced Time Perspective Scale (BTPS; Webster, 2011), which has been specifically designed to assess the combined use of positive future and past mental representations as resources for the self. Data were collected from an online survey in a sample of 622 French-speaking individuals from the general population. Results indicated that the French version of the BTPS replicated the 2-factor structure of the original questionnaire, and showed excellent internal consistency. External validity was supported by specific rela- tionships with measures of TP and positive affect. In addition, a high propensity to project oneself positively both in the future and the past was associated with greater use of cognitive reappraisal. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Influence of future thinking on prosocial behavior
Cernadas Curotto, Patricia; Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Klimecki, Olga et al

Poster (2017)

Previous studies suggest a link between episodic mental simulations and prosocial behaviors, but this association is not fully understood. Here, we aimed to test whether prospection (or future thinking ... [more ▼]

Previous studies suggest a link between episodic mental simulations and prosocial behaviors, but this association is not fully understood. Here, we aimed to test whether prospection (or future thinking) could foster prosocial behaviors, and whether these prosocial behaviors correlate with several empathic traits. We also investigated whether the link between prospection and prosociality was mediated by cognitive empathy. Forty-eight participants received a future fluency (prospection condition) or verbal fluency (control condition) task and then played the Zürich Prosocial Game (ZPG; Leiberg, Klimecki, & Singer, 2011) in which they could help other fictitious participants. Consistent with our hypothesis, the results revealed that participants in the prospection condition engaged in significantly more prosocial behaviors than participants in the control condition. In addition, dispositional orientation towards the future and the past was significantly associated with empathy traits. Empathy traits were partially related to prosocial behaviors in the ZPG. However, we found no evidence that cognitive empathy mediated the relationship between prospection and prosociality. In summary, our findings provide initial evidence indicating that future thinking increases prosocial behaviors and that dispositional temporal orientation is related to empathy. These results are in line with the hypothesis of common core processes in different episodic simulations (Hassabis & Maguire, 2007). Finally, our research also confirms a link between empathy and prosocial behavior (Underwood & Moore, 1982). [less ▲]

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See detailOutlining face processing skills of portrait artists: Performance reflects perceptual experience with faces.
Devue, Christel ULiege; Barsics, Catherine ULiege

in Vision Research (2016), 127

Most humans seem to demonstrate astonishingly high levels of skill in face processing if one considers the sophisticated level of fine-tuned discrimination that face recognition requires. However ... [more ▼]

Most humans seem to demonstrate astonishingly high levels of skill in face processing if one considers the sophisticated level of fine-tuned discrimination that face recognition requires. However, numerous studies now indicate that the ability to process faces is not as fundamental as once thought and that performance can range from despairingly poor to extraordinarily high across people. Here we studied people who are super-specialists of faces, namely portrait artists, to examine how their specific visual experience with faces relates to a range of face processing skills (perceptual discrimination, short- and longer term recognition). Artists show better perceptual discrimination and, to some extent, recognition of newly learned faces than controls. They are also more accurate on other perceptual tasks (i.e., involving non-face stimuli or mental rotation). By contrast, artists do not display an advantage compared to controls on longer term face recognition (i.e., famous faces) nor on person recognition from other sensorial modalities (i.e., voices). Finally, the face inversion effect exists in artists and controls and is not modulated by artistic practice. Advantages in face processing for artists thus seem to closely mirror perceptual and visual short term memory skills involved in portraiture. [less ▲]

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See detailFrequency, characteristics, and perceived functions of emotional future thinking in daily life
Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Van der Linden, Martial ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege

in Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology (2016), 69

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See detailPerson recognition is easier from faces than from voices
Barsics, Catherine ULiege

in Psychologica Belgica (2014), 54(3), 244254

This article reviews a number of recent studies that systematically compared the access to semantic and episodic information from faces and voices. Results have showed that semantic and episodic ... [more ▼]

This article reviews a number of recent studies that systematically compared the access to semantic and episodic information from faces and voices. Results have showed that semantic and episodic information is easier to retrieve from faces than from voices. This advantage of faces over voices is a robust phenomenon, which emerges whatever the kind of target persons, might they be famous, personally familiar to the participants, or newly learned. Theoretical accounts of this face advantage over voice are finally discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes drawing faces make you a super-expert of faces? An investigation of face perception and recognition abilities in visual artists.
Devue, Christel ULiege; Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege

Poster (2012, September 01)

Face recognition abilities might constitute a continuum with developmental prosopagnosia and outstanding face recognition capacity at each extreme. 'Super-recognizers' display better face processing ... [more ▼]

Face recognition abilities might constitute a continuum with developmental prosopagnosia and outstanding face recognition capacity at each extreme. 'Super-recognizers' display better face processing abilities than controls and show a larger face inversion effect (FIE) [Russell et al, 2009, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16 (2), 252-257]. Hence, FIE could reflect a specific visual experience/expertise with faces compared to other objects rather than a qualitatively different kind of processing. In this experiment we tested face processing abilities of visual artists who practice portraiture, as well as more general visual perception and recognition skills, in order to contribute to the long-lasting debate about a possible special status of faces. If some special processing faces benefit from is due to expertise, artists' practice might lead to better perceptual and possibly recognition performance with upright faces compared to controls, while increasing the FIE. Because they need to take both configural and featural information into account to reach a satisfactory likeness, artists might also make a differential use of these facial cues compared to controls. Preliminary data indicate that face processing performance might indeed be linked to perceptual expertise with faces. [less ▲]

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See detailThe retrieval of semantic and episodic information from faces and voices: A face advantage.
Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege

in Perception (2012, September), 41(ECVP abstract suppl.), 115

Recent findings indicate that semantic and episodic information is more likely to be retrieved from faces than voices [Damjanovic & Hanley, 2007, Memory and Cognition, 35(6), 1205-1210]. Previous studies ... [more ▼]

Recent findings indicate that semantic and episodic information is more likely to be retrieved from faces than voices [Damjanovic & Hanley, 2007, Memory and Cognition, 35(6), 1205-1210]. Previous studies investigating this 'face advantage' over voice used famous faces and voices as stimuli, which induced several methodological difficulties. We present four studies aimed at further examining the differential retrieval of semantic and episodic information from faces and voices. Study 1 and 2 compare the retrieval of semantic and episodic information from pre-experimentally personally familiar faces and voices [Brédart, Barsics, & Hanley, 2009, European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 21(7), 1013-1021; Barsics & Brédart, 2011, Consciousness and Cognition, 20(2), 303-308]. In Study 3, an associative learning paradigm is used in order to strictly control the frequency of exposure with faces and voices. The recall of semantic information is subsequently assessed from faces and voices. In Study 4, distinctiveness impact on semantic information retrieval from faces and voices is assessed, as it could constitute a key factor underlying the face advantage over voice. All results are in line with the face advantage. These findings are discussed at the light of current models of person recognition. An account in terms of expertise is finally proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of face and voice learning on access to semantic information from names.
Barsics, Catherine ULiege

in Perception (2010), 39 supplement

Several studies showed that it is more difficult to retrieve semantic information from recognized voices than from recognized faces. However, earlier studies that investigated the recall of biographical ... [more ▼]

Several studies showed that it is more difficult to retrieve semantic information from recognized voices than from recognized faces. However, earlier studies that investigated the recall of biographical information following person recognition used stimuli that were pre-experimentally familiar to the participants, such as famous people’s voices and faces. The present study was designed in order to allow a stricter control of frequency exposure with both types of stimuli (voices and faces) and to ensure the absence of identity cues in the spoken extracts. In the present study, subjects had to associate lexical (i.e., name) and semantic information (i.e., occupation) with faces or voices. Interestingly, when asked later to recall semantic information being cued by the person’s names, participants provided significantly more occupations for the targets that had been previously associated with faces than with voices. Moreover, participants’ performance was not significantly different when names and occupation were associated with voices compared with dog’s faces, whose complexity is similar to that of human faces, but for which we have poorer discrimination abilities. These results and their implications for person recognition models, as well as the potential role of the relative distinctiveness of faces and voices, are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailFamiliar person recognition: do we remember more episodic memories from faces than from names?
Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege

Poster (2009)

This study was aimed at investigating whether the recognition of familiar faces is more likely to be associated with an experience of Remembering than the recognition of familiar names. Using the Remember ... [more ▼]

This study was aimed at investigating whether the recognition of familiar faces is more likely to be associated with an experience of Remembering than the recognition of familiar names. Using the Remember/Know paradigm the proportions of episodic memories recalled following the recognition of famous faces and names (Conditions) were assessed. Presented faces and names were previously judged by an independent group of participants as eliciting an equivalent level of familiarity. Nevertheless significant differences between the two conditions appeared in hit and false alarm rates. However, present results showed no significant difference in the recollection of personal memories (Remember responses conditionalized on the hits), following familiar faces compared with familiar names recognition. This finding contrasts with recent accounts assuming that faces are more prone to yield episodic memories than other cues to person identity. These results and their implications for current Interactive Activation and Competition person recognition models are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailRetrieving episodic memories when recognizing familiar faces and names.
Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Brédart, Serge ULiege

in Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society. (2009)

This study was aimed at investigating whether the recognition of familiar faces is more likely to be associated with an experience of Remembering than the recognition of familiar names. Using the Remember ... [more ▼]

This study was aimed at investigating whether the recognition of familiar faces is more likely to be associated with an experience of Remembering than the recognition of familiar names. Using the Remember/Know paradigm the proportions of episodic memories recalled following the recognition of famous faces and names (Conditions) were assessed. Presented faces and names were previously judged by an independent group of participants as eliciting an equivalent level of familiarity. Nevertheless significant differences between the two conditions appeared in hit and false alarm rates. However, present results showed no significant difference in the recollection of personal memories (Remember responses conditionalized on the hits), following familiar faces compared with familiar names recognition. This finding contrasts with recent accounts assuming that faces are more prone to yield episodic memories than other cues to person identity. These results and their implications for current Interactive Activation and Competition person recognition models are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailRecalling semantic information about personally known faces and voices
Brédart, Serge ULiege; Barsics, Catherine ULiege; Hanley, Rick

in European Journal of Cognitive Psychology (2009), 21(7), 1013-1021

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