Publications of Loïc Quinton
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See detailMass shift in Mass Spectrometry Imaging: comprehensive analysis and practical corrective workflow
Mc Cann, Andréa ULiege; Rappe, Sophie ULiege; La Rocca, Raphaël ULiege et al

in Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (2021)

tentative identification of compounds based on their m/z value. In typical MSI, a spectrum is taken at incremental 2D coordinates (pixels) across a sample surface. Single pixel mass spectra show the ... [more ▼]

tentative identification of compounds based on their m/z value. In typical MSI, a spectrum is taken at incremental 2D coordinates (pixels) across a sample surface. Single pixel mass spectra show the resolving power of the mass analyzer. Mass shift, i.e., variations of the m/z of the same ion(s), may occur from one pixel to another. The superposition of shifted masses from individual pixels peaks apparently degrades the resolution and the mass accuracy in the average spectrum. This leads to low confidence annotations and biased localization in the image. Besides the intrinsic performances of the analyzer, the sample properties (local composition, thickness, matrix deposition) and the calibration method are sources of mass shift. Here, we report a critical analysis and recommendations to mitigate these sources of mass shift. Mass shift 2D distributions were mapped to illustrate its effect and explore systematically its origin. Adapting the sample preparation, carefully selecting the data acquisition settings, and wisely applying post-processing methods (i.e., m/z realignment or individual m/z recalibration pixel by pixel) are key factors to lower the mass shift and to improve image quality and annotations. A recommended workflow, resulting from a comprehensive analysis, was successfully applied to several complex samples acquired on both MALDI ToF and MALDI FT-ICR instruments. [less ▲]

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See detailAdaptive Pixel Mass Recalibration for Mass Spectrometry Imaging Based on Locally Endogenous Biological Signals.
La Rocca, Raphaël ULiege; Kune, Christopher ULiege; Tiquet, Mathieu ULiege et al

in Analytical Chemistry (2021)

Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful and convenient method for revealing the spatial chemical composition of different biological samples. Molecular annotation of the detected signals is only ... [more ▼]

Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful and convenient method for revealing the spatial chemical composition of different biological samples. Molecular annotation of the detected signals is only possible if a high mass accuracy is maintained over the entire image and the m/z range. However, the change in the number of ions from pixel-to-pixel of the biological samples could lead to small fluctuations in the detected m/z-values, called mass shift. The use of internal calibration is known to offer the best solution to avoid, or at least to reduce, mass shifts. Their “a priori” selection for a global MSI acquisition is prone to false positive detection and therefore to poor recalibration. To fill this gap, this work describes an algorithm that recalibrates each spectrum individually by estimating its mass shift with the help of a list of pixel-specific internal calibrating ions, automatically generated in a data-adaptive manner (https://github.com/LaRoccaRaphael/MSI_recalibration). Through a practical example, we applied the methodology to a zebrafish whole-body section acquired at a high mass resolution to demonstrate the impact of mass shift on data analysis and the capability of our algorithm to recalibrate MSI data. In addition, we illustrate the broad applicability of the method by recalibrating 31 different public MSI data sets from METASPACE from various samples and types of MSI and show that our recalibration significantly increases the numbers of METASPACE annotations (gaining from 20 up to 400 additional annotations), particularly the high-confidence annotations with a low false discovery rate. [less ▲]

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See detailVenomics approach reveals a high proportion of Lactrodectus-like toxins in Steatoda nobilis venom - First link to post-bite symptomology
Dunbar, John; Fort, Antoine; Redureau, Damien ULiege et al

Poster (2020, September)

The Noble false widow spider Steatoda nobilis has expanded its range globally and may represent a potential threat to native ecosystems and public health. Envenomations can result in local and systemic ... [more ▼]

The Noble false widow spider Steatoda nobilis has expanded its range globally and may represent a potential threat to native ecosystems and public health. Envenomations can result in local and systemic neurotoxic symptoms, similar to true black widows (genus Latrodectus). We used transcriptomic and proteomic cutting-edge approaches to deeply characterise S. nobilis venom. Among the toxins, the most represented in numbers are α-latrotoxins, 𝛿-latroinsectotoxins and latrodectins, which were first characterised from black widow venoms. Approximately two-thirds of the venom is composed of Latrodectus-like toxins. We present symptomology from 23 cases (15 unpublished) of S.nobilis envenomations confirming necrosis and Latrodectus-like symptoms such as debilitating pain, tremors, fatigue, nausea and hypotension. The continued rising numbers of S. nobilis will undoubtedly result in further bites and this study will help provide the medical community with a better understanding of the potential medical outcomes from bites by this species and alert them to the possibility of medically important outcomes. [less ▲]

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See detailA Venomics approach coupled to high-throughput toxin production strategies identifies the first venom-derived melanocortin receptor agonists.
Reynaud, Steve; Ciolek, Justyna; Degueldre, Michel ULiege et al

in Journal of medicinal chemistry (2020)

Animal venoms are rich in hundreds of toxins with extraordinary biological activities. Their exploitation is difficult due to their complexity and the small quantities of venom available from most ... [more ▼]

Animal venoms are rich in hundreds of toxins with extraordinary biological activities. Their exploitation is difficult due to their complexity and the small quantities of venom available from most venomous species. We developed a Venomics approach combining transcriptomic and proteomic characterization of 191 species and identified 20,206 venom toxin sequences. Two complementary production strategies based on solid-phase synthesis and recombinant expression in E. coli generated a physical bank of 3,597 toxins. Screened on hMC4R, this bank gave an incredible hit rate of 8%. Here, we focus on two novel toxins: N-TRTX-Preg1a, exhibiting an inhibitory cystine knot (ICK) motif, and N-BUTX-Ptr1a, a short scorpion-CSαβ structure. Neither N-TRTX-Preg1a nor N-BUTX-Ptr1a affect ion channels, the known targets of their toxin scaffolds, but bind to four melanocortin receptors with low micromolar affinities and activate the hMC1R/Gs pathway. Phylogenetically, these two toxins form new groups within their respective families and represent novel hMC1R agonists, structurally unrelated to the natural agonists. [less ▲]

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See detailUnravelling chemical mechanisms in microbial interactions by combining thin layer chromatography, ion mobility and MALDI imaging mass spectrometry
Mc Cann, Andréa ULiege; Kune, Christopher ULiege; La Rocca, Raphaël ULiege et al

Conference (2020, June 01)

Mass spectrometry (MS) is a method of choice in microbiology for untargeted detection and identification of bioactive compounds. Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) has led to a growing interest in the in ... [more ▼]

Mass spectrometry (MS) is a method of choice in microbiology for untargeted detection and identification of bioactive compounds. Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) has led to a growing interest in the in situ study of biomolecules produced when microorganisms interact with each other. However, in situ identification is still time-consuming and challenging due to the large chemical diversity contained in each pixel of the samples, resulting in very complex average MS spectra. Here, we propose to exploit the power of combining Kendrick Mass Defect (KMD) analysis and collision cross section (CCS) values using mobility for the characterization of families of related compounds in MSI. The identification of compounds was supported by rapid thin layer chromatography (TLC) separation coupled to MALDI-MS/MS detection. Bacillus velezensis GA1 and Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a were inoculated at different distances (0.5, 1 and 2 cm) on a semi-solid agar-based medium and incubated at 30°C. Regions of interest were cut directly from the Petri dish and transferred to the target ITO plate. This assembly was placed in a vacuum desiccator until completely dry and covered with HCCA matrix (Sunchrom sprayer). Ion mobility in imaging mode was performed using the timsTOF fleX (Bruker Daltonics, Bremen, Germany). TLC separation of ROI extracts is analyzed by MALDI-MS/MS imaging on the rapifleX instrument (Bruker Daltonics) for rapid screening of compounds and on the solariX instrument (Bruker Daltonics) for exact mass and isotopic distribution. The data were processed and integrated with in-house software. The coupling of MALDI-MSI with ion mobility separation brings additional structural features/information. It allows data to be filtered according to a range of CCS values and it improves the confidence level for the identification of detected analytes, in addition to exact mass determination. A relationship between CCS and mass was also performed. In combination with KMD analysis, various families of compounds, such as lipids or lipopeptides could be automatically detected and identified. Through this workflow, the comparison of the three different culture conditions was greatly simplified and highlighted the changes that occur in the metabolism of the bacteria. In particular, we were able to observe a variation within the lipid composition of Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a as a function of distance from the Bacillus velezensis GA1 colony. Finally, TLC separation was successfully optimized for lipopeptides and lipids and validated the identification of detected compounds by simplifying the spectra and allowing image analysis. TLC also enables high throughput, in part due to the parallel imaging of up to 6 traces on a single TLC run. TLC plate matrix coating strategies were compared to optimize the MALDI MS signal. This workflow will also be applied to time-lapse (or time-dependent) experiments, to monitor the bioactive compounds production and migration as a function of the co-culture interaction time. [less ▲]

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See detailData treatment for mass spectrometry
La Rocca, Raphaël ULiege; Quinton, Loïc ULiege; De Pauw, Edwin ULiege

Conference (2020, January 28)

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See detailData processing and interpretation of mass spectrometry imaging using high resolving mass power
Mc Cann, Andréa ULiege; La Rocca, Raphaël ULiege; Kune, Christopher ULiege et al

Poster (2020, January 28)

1 Introduction Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) is a powerful analytical tool allowing untargeted investigation of spatial distribution of molecular species in a large variety of samples, by recording 2D ... [more ▼]

1 Introduction Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) is a powerful analytical tool allowing untargeted investigation of spatial distribution of molecular species in a large variety of samples, by recording 2D distribution of all the detectable compounds in the sample. Over the years, the application of MSI has become increasingly diverse, from bacteria-bacteria interaction understanding to biomarker discovery. To this end, it is necessary to combine high spectral resolution with efficient data processing, in order to maximise the extraction of the information contained in large datasets. Moreover, in addition to deal with thousands of features, pixel-to-pixel mass shift must be taken into account before applying any data-mining tool. For that reason, we propose the combination of a post-acquisition label-free recalibration method and an algorithm to cluster features based on their Kendrick mass defect (KMD) in MSI. 2 Theory KMD consists in a change of basis from the IUPAC mass scale to a Kendrick mass based on the nominal mass of a defined Kendrick mass unit, such as CH2 (here, nominal mass is set at 14 a.u.)1. The KMD is obtained by subtracting the nominal Kendrick mass to the exact Kendrick mass. This mathematical transformation enables to map the detected molecules in mass spectrometry based on their chemical composition. 3 Material and methods MALDIFT-ICR-MS (SolariX XR 9.4T) images were first converted into imzML open format. Each spectrum from the imzML file obtained for an MSI are individually peak picked. Then, our algorithm creates, for each pixel, a linear model linking m/z error and m/z. The model is creating by finding database hit with similar mass shift. Finally, a new imzML file is created by recalibrating each pixel with their estimated linear model. Then, we developed a software to filter features (m/z peaks) based on their KMD from an imzML file. This software calculates first a KMD for each m/z values detected in the mean mass spectrum of the image. The MSI data is then filtered based on KMD value to conserve only ions whose KMD is included in the user-defined KMD range. The reduced ion lists were then divided into different compounds families, based on the repetition of the KMD. Finally, an image is generated for each compounds family. Thereby reducing the number of features of an image2. 4 Results and discussion The KMD filtering method applied on a mouse brain tissue analysis by MSI appears to be biologically relevant since it enabled to map in a single step all members of important families of biomolecules. Among the detected families of biomolecules, lipids shows different distributions and localisations. Some of these lipids belonged to the glycerophosphocholines (GPCs), the hexosylceramides (HexCers), lysophoshocholins (LPCs) and the sphingomyelins (SMs) class. Moreover, The KMD analysis highlighted that some of the detected GPCs on the brain tissue sections from mouse were differentially co-localized, depending on their unsaturation degree. All these results suggested that the KMD could be considered instead of the mass-to-charge (m/z) values classically used for the analysis of images by MSI. The use of our in-house developed software for KMD analysis enables an automated, faster and efficient data analysis of MSI images. 5 Conclusion The combination of recalibration before using Kendrick mass defect mass filter is an essential step to be able to interpret the image reconstruction of chemically-related compounds. This methods speed up the identification process and facilitates the data analysis without losing data information. [less ▲]

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See detailEffective Temperature and Structural Rearrangement in Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry
Morsa, Denis ULiege; Hanozin, Emeline ULiege; Eppe, Gauthier ULiege et al

in Analytical Chemistry (2020)

Modern ion mobility instrumentations are typically operated above the low field limit, which may activate the ions and cause structural rearrangement or fragmentation during the analysis. Here, we ... [more ▼]

Modern ion mobility instrumentations are typically operated above the low field limit, which may activate the ions and cause structural rearrangement or fragmentation during the analysis. Here, we quantitatively assessed the internal heating experienced by ions during trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) experiments. To this end, the fragmentation yields of fragile benzylpyridinium “thermometer” ions were monitored during both the accumulation and analysis steps inside the TIMS tunnel. The corresponding fragmentation rate constants were translated into a vibrational effective temperature Teff,vib. Our results demonstrate significant fragmentation upstream and inside the TIMS tunnel that corresponds to Teff,vib ≈ 510 K during both the accumulation and analysis steps. Broadening our scope to cytochrome c and lysozyme, we showed that although compact “native” folds can be preserved, the collision cross section distributions are highly sensitive to the transmission voltages and the analysis timescale. Our results are discussed with regard to Teff,vib data previously acquired on traveling-wave (TWIMS) ion mobility in the context of native mass spectrometry and conformational landscape exploration. [less ▲]

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See detailVenomics Approach Reveals a High Proportion of Lactrodectus-Like Toxins in the Venom of the Noble False Widow Spider Steatoda nobilis.
Dunbar, John P.; Fort, Antoine; Redureau, Damien et al

in Toxins (2020), 12(6),

The noble false widow spider Steatoda nobilis originates from the Macaronesian archipelago and has expanded its range globally. Outside of its natural range, it may have a negative impact on native ... [more ▼]

The noble false widow spider Steatoda nobilis originates from the Macaronesian archipelago and has expanded its range globally. Outside of its natural range, it may have a negative impact on native wildlife, and in temperate regions it lives in synanthropic environments where it frequently encounters humans, subsequently leading to envenomations. S. nobilis is the only medically significant spider in Ireland and the UK, and envenomations have resulted in local and systemic neurotoxic symptoms similar to true black widows (genus Latrodectus). S. nobilis is a sister group to Latrodectus which possesses the highly potent neurotoxins called α-latrotoxins that can induce neuromuscular paralysis and is responsible for human fatalities. However, and despite this close relationship, the venom composition of S. nobilis has never been investigated. In this context, a combination of transcriptomic and proteomic cutting-edge approaches has been used to deeply characterise S. nobilis venom. Mining of transcriptome data for the peptides identified by proteomics revealed 240 annotated sequences, of which 118 are related to toxins, 37 as enzymes, 43 as proteins involved in various biological functions, and 42 proteins without any identified function to date. Among the toxins, the most represented in numbers are α-latrotoxins (61), δ-latroinsectotoxins (44) and latrodectins (6), all of which were first characterised from black widow venoms. Transcriptomics alone provided a similar representation to proteomics, thus demonstrating that our approach is highly sensitive and accurate. More precisely, a relative quantification approach revealed that latrodectins are the most concentrated toxin (28%), followed by α-latrotoxins (11%), δ-latroinsectotoxins (11%) and α-latrocrustotoxins (11%). Approximately two-thirds of the venom is composed of Latrodectus-like toxins. Such toxins are highly potent towards the nervous system of vertebrates and likely responsible for the array of symptoms occurring after envenomation by black widows and false widows. Thus, caution should be taken in dismissing S. nobilis as harmless. This work paves the way towards a better understanding of the competitiveness of S. nobilis and its potential medical importance. [less ▲]

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See detailVenomics of the asp viper Vipera aspis aspis from France
Giribaldi, J.; Kazandjian, T.; Amorim, F. G. et al

in Journal of Proteomics (2020), 218

The asp viper Vipera aspis aspis is a venomous snake found in France, and despite its medical importance, the complete toxin repertoire produced is unknown. Here, we used a venomics approach to decipher ... [more ▼]

The asp viper Vipera aspis aspis is a venomous snake found in France, and despite its medical importance, the complete toxin repertoire produced is unknown. Here, we used a venomics approach to decipher the composition of its venom. Transcriptomic analysis revealed 80 venom-annotated sequences grouped into 16 gene families. Among the most represented toxins were snake venom metalloproteases (23%), phospholipases A2 (15%), serine proteases (13%), snake venom metalloprotease inhibitors (13%) and C-type lectins (12%). LC-MS of venoms revealed similar profiles regardless of the method of extraction (milking vs defensive bite). Proteomic analysis validated 57 venom-annotated transcriptomic sequences (>70%), including one for each of the 16 families, but also identified 7 sequences not initially annotated as venom proteins, including a serine protease, a disintegrin, a glutaminyl-peptide cyclotransferase, a proactivator polypeptide-like and 3 aminopeptidases. Interestingly, phospholipases A2 were the dominant proteins in the venom, among which included an ammodytoxin B-like sequence, which may explain the reported neurotoxicity following some asp viper envenomations. In total, 87 sequences were retrieved from the Vipera aspis aspis transcriptome and proteome, constituting a valuable resource that will help in understanding the toxinological basis of clinical signs of envenoming and for the mining of useful pharmacological compounds. Biological significance: The asp viper (Vipera aspis aspis) causes several hundred envenomations annually in France, including unusual cases with neurological signs, resulting in one death per year on average. Here, we performed a proteotranscriptomic analysis of V. a. aspis venom in order to provide a better understanding of its venom composition. We found that, as in other Vipera species, phospholipase A2 dominates in the venom, and the presence of a sequence related to ammodytoxin B may explain the reported neurotoxicity following some asp viper envenomations. Thus, this study will help in informing the toxinological basis of clinical signs of envenoming. © 2020 Elsevier B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailA comparative study on the leishmanicidal activity of the L-amino acid oxidases BjussuLAAO-II and BmooLAAO-II isolated from Brazilian Bothrops snake venoms
Barbosa, Luana Gonçalves; Costa, Tassia Rafaela; Borges, Isabela Pacheco et al

in International Journal of Biological Macromolecules (2020)

This study aims to examine whether two L-amino acid oxidases isolated from Bothrops snake venom (SV-LAAOs) were cytotoxic to Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis and Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, two ... [more ▼]

This study aims to examine whether two L-amino acid oxidases isolated from Bothrops snake venom (SV-LAAOs) were cytotoxic to Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis and Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, two causative agents of leishmaniasis, which is an endemic disease in tropical and subtropical countries. The SV-LAAOs BjussuLAAO-II and BmooLAAO-II were isolated from Bothrops jararacussu and Bothrops moojeni venom, respectively, through a three-step chromatography process that used molecular exclusion, hydrophobic interaction, and affinity columns. BmooLAAO-II is a new SV-LAAO isoform that we isolated in this study. The purified BjussuLAAO-II and BmooLAAO-II had high L-amino acid oxidase-specific activity: 3481.17 and 4924.77 U/mg/min, respectively. Both SV-LAAOs were strongly cytotoxic to the two Leishmania species, even at low concentrations. At the same concentration, BjussuLAAO-II and BmooLAAO-II exerted different cytotoxic effects on the parasites. We reported for the first time that the SV-LAAOs suppressed cell proliferation and altered the mitochondrial membrane potential of the two Leishmania species. Surprisingly, BjussuLAAO-II increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species production only in L. (L.) amazonensis, while BmooLAAO-II increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species production only in L. (V.) braziliensis, indicating that these SV-LAAOs had a certain specificity of action. [less ▲]

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See detailCombination of Capillary Zone Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometry, Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry, and Theoretical Calculations for Cysteine Connectivity Identification in Peptides Bearing Two Intramolecular Disulfide Bonds
Delvaux, Cédric ULiege; Massonnet, Philippe ULiege; Kune, Christopher ULiege et al

in Analytical Chemistry (2019)

Disulfide bonds between cysteine residues are commonly involved in the stability of numerous peptides and proteins and are crucial for providing biological activities. In such peptides, the appropriate ... [more ▼]

Disulfide bonds between cysteine residues are commonly involved in the stability of numerous peptides and proteins and are crucial for providing biological activities. In such peptides, the appropriate cysteine connectivity ensures the proper conformation allowing an efficient binding to their molecular targets. Disulfide bond connectivity characterization is still challenging and is a critical issue in the analysis of structured peptides/proteins targeting pharmaceutical or pharmacological utilizations. This study describes the development of new and fast gas-phase and in-solution electrophoretic methods coupled to mass spectrometry to characterize the cysteine connectivity of disulfide bonds. For this purpose, disulfide isomers of three peptides bearing two intramolecular disulfide bonds but different cysteine connectivity have been investigated. Capillary zone electrophoresis and ion mobility both coupled to mass spectrometry were used to perform the separation in both aqueous and gas phases, respectively. The separation efficiency of each technique has been critically evaluated and compared. Finally, theoretical calculations were performed to support and explain the experimental data based on the predicted physicochemical properties of the different peptides. [less ▲]

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See detailRapid identification of chemically-related compounds produced by bacteria by Kendrick mass defect filtering applied to high resolution imaging mass spectrometry
Mc Cann, Andréa ULiege; Kune, Christopher ULiege; La Rocca, Raphaël ULiege et al

Poster (2019, October 30)

Introduction Over the last years, lots of progress have been done in the development of mass spectrometry imaging, making the technique more and more accessible for various applications, such as ... [more ▼]

Introduction Over the last years, lots of progress have been done in the development of mass spectrometry imaging, making the technique more and more accessible for various applications, such as biomarkers discovery or bioactive compounds identification. However, the progresses made in terms of spatial and instrumental resolution has for consequences the dramatic increase of dataset size, shifting the burden from data production to data analysis and compounds identification. We propose here to use a semi-targeted method based on Kendrick mass defect (KMD) analysis to immediately identify the chemistry-related compounds in mass spectrometry imaging applied to microbiology samples. Thanks to a software developed in-house, we are now able to better understand the bacteria-bacteria interactions. Materials and methods Bacteria strains were inoculated on a semi-solid agar-based medium and incubated at 30°C. Region of interest was cut directly from the petri dish and transferred to the target ITO plate, previously covered with double sided conductive carbon tape. This assembly was then put in a vacuum desiccator until complete drying (overnight), and covered with HCCA matrix. Mass spectrometry images were obtained using a FT-ICR mass spectrometer (9.4T SolariX, Bruker Daltonics, Bremen, Germany). Data analysis was performed on an in-house software. Results & Discussion KMD filtering for mass spectrometry imaging enabled the rapid identification of chemically-related compounds such as lipopeptides or lipids, independently of the signal intensity and without the need of an extensive database search. For each detected family of compounds, an image was generated, enabling to link the chemically-related compounds identified with their spatial localization. The analysis of the bacteria-bacteria interaction was greatly simplified by our in-house software, and we were able to have a better understanding of the underlying chemical mechanisms involved. [less ▲]

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See detailA Mechanistic Study of Protonated Aniline to Protonated Phenol Substitution Considering Tautomerization by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Kune, Christopher ULiege; Delvaux, Cédric ULiege; Haler, Jean ULiege et al

in Journal of the American Chemical Society (2019), 30

We report the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMMS) and energy-resolved collisional activation to investigate gas-phase reactions of protonated aniline and protonated phenol. Protonated aniline ... [more ▼]

We report the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMMS) and energy-resolved collisional activation to investigate gas-phase reactions of protonated aniline and protonated phenol. Protonated aniline prototropic tautomerization and nucleophilic substitution (SN1) to produce phenol with traces of water in the IMMS cell are reported. Tautomerization of protonated phenol and its ability to form protonated aniline in presence of ammonia in the gas phase are also observed. These results are supported by energy landscapes obtained from computational chemistry. These structure modifications in the IMMS cell affected the measured collision cross section (CCS). A thorough understanding of the gas-phase reactions occurring in IMMS appears mandatory before using the experimental CCS as a robust descriptor which is stated by the recent literature. [less ▲]

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See detailRapid Visualization of Chemically Related Compounds Using Kendrick Mass Defect As a Filter in Mass Spectrometry Imaging
Kune, Christopher ULiege; Mc Cann, Andréa ULiege; La Rocca, Raphaël ULiege et al

in Analytical Chemistry (2019), 91(20), 13112-13118

Kendrick mass defect (KMD) analysis is widely used for helping the detection and identification of chemically related compounds based on exact mass measurements. We report here the use of KMD as a ... [more ▼]

Kendrick mass defect (KMD) analysis is widely used for helping the detection and identification of chemically related compounds based on exact mass measurements. We report here the use of KMD as a criterion for filtering complex mass spectrometry data set. The method allow automated, easy and efficient data processing, enabling the reconstruction of 2D distributions of families of homologous compounds from MSI images. We show that KMD filtering, based on in-house software, is suitable and robust for high resolution (full width at half-maximum, fwhm, at m/z 410 of 20 000) and very high-resolution (fwhm, at m/z 410 of 160 000) MSI data. This method has been successfully applied to two different types of samples, bacteria cocultures, and brain tissue sections. [less ▲]

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See detailAutomatic exploration of images using ultra high resolution MS
La Rocca, Raphaël ULiege; Tiquet, Mathieu ULiege; Rappe, Sophie ULiege et al

Conference (2019, June 18)

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See detailComputational chemistry and ion mobility – mass spectrometry at high resolving power suggest prototropism of cyclic lipopeptides
Mc Cann, Andréa ULiege; Kune, Christopher ULiege; Far, Johann ULiege et al

Poster (2019, June)

Introduction Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are cyclic hydrophilic peptides with a lipid ramification using a β-hydroxy fatty acid that are produced by bacteria in a ribosome independent manner. Despite CLPs ... [more ▼]

Introduction Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are cyclic hydrophilic peptides with a lipid ramification using a β-hydroxy fatty acid that are produced by bacteria in a ribosome independent manner. Despite CLPs have relatively low molecular weight between 800 and 2,000 Da, the analysis of lipopeptides remains challenging due to the wide variety of synthetized isoforms differing in fatty acid chain length, in methyl group branching position, and in the nature of the amino-acids residues. These isoforms are suspected to have different biological activities requiring development of reliable methods for CLPs characterization. We present here an original approach combining UPLC and ion mobility - mass spectrometry at high resolving powers to separate the different species. Experimentally determined CCS will be compared with theoretical ones. Methods Lipopeptides were separated by UPLC (I-class, Waters, U.K.) on a C18 BEH column and identified by CID MS/MS mass spectrometry. Ion mobility – mass spectrometry (IM-MS) measurements were performed on a traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometer (Synapt G2 HDMS from Waters, U.K.) and on a trapped Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometer (timsTOF, Bruker Daltonics, U.S.A.) to investigate the 3D structures of the ionized lipopeptides. Accurate Collison Cross Section (CCS) were obtained in both positive and negative mode and compared with theoretical CCS. Density Functional Theory (Gaussian) was used for structure optimizations at the CAM-B3LYP level of theory and 3-21G as basis set. Theoretical CCS have been computed from optimized structures using the trajectory method from IMoS V2. Preliminary data Separation of lipopeptides such as surfactins was successfully performed by reverse phase liquid chromatography. Lipopeptides were separated according to lipidic chain length and the branching position of the methyl group (iso/anteiso/linear). In positive ionization mode, the infusion of each isolated isoforms in the Synapt G2 showed a broad IMS distribution. These ion mobility profiles suggested the presence of different conformers. The higher IMS resolving power of the TIMS allowed the detection of at least three near-resolved peaks for a single isomer. In negative ionization mode however, only one peak was observed in the IM-MS profile on both Synapt G2 and TIMS, corresponding to one CCS. We included prototropic hypotheses where all the potential protonation and deprotonation sites on each lipopeptide had been determined by theoretical calculation. The abundances of the species in the CCS distributions of the resulting structures were obtained based on the Boltzmann distribution. Regarding the surfactin family, preliminary calculations by DFT shows that several protonation sites are energetically favorable and that the proton localization has a significant effect on the resulting CCS (∆CCS = 10Ų). These results are in good agreement with the experimental IMS profiles, obtained in both positive and negative ionization mode. Lipopeptides are then not related to a unique CCS value but a set of IM-MS profile that probably contains additional structural and physicochemical information. Novel aspect Experimental and theoretical approaches for lipopeptides IMS profiles analysis: protonation site determination, peaks intensity prediction and structural information extraction. [less ▲]

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