Publications of Christine Bastin
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailRepeatability of ultra-high-resolution Multi-Parametric Mapping across five 7T sites
Sherif, Siya ULiege; Aghaeifar, Ali; pine., Kerrin et al

Conference (2022)

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailIn vivo exploration of synaptic projections in frontotemporal dementia.
Salmon, Eric ULiege; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege; Plenevaux, Alain ULiege et al

in Scientific Reports (2021)

The purpose of this exploratory research is to provide data on synaptopathy in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Twelve patients with probable bvFTD were compared to 12 control ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this exploratory research is to provide data on synaptopathy in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Twelve patients with probable bvFTD were compared to 12 control participants and 12 patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Loss of synaptic projections was assessed with ­[18F]UCBH-PET. Total distribution volume was obtained with Logan method using carotid artery derived input function. Neuroimages were analyzed with SPM12. Verbal fluency, episodic memory and awareness of cognitive impairment were equally impaired in patients groups. Compared to controls, ­[18F]UCBH uptake tended to decrease in the right anterior parahippocampal gyrus of bvFTD patients. Loss of synaptic projections was observed in the right hippocampus of AD participants, but there was no significant difference in ­[18F]UCBH brain uptake between patients groups. Anosognosia for clinical disorder was correlated with synaptic density in the caudate nucleus and the anteromedial prefrontal cortex. This study suggests that synaptopathy in bvFTD targets the temporal social brain and self-referential processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailImpaired explicit self-awareness but preserved behavioral regulation in patients with Alzheimer Disease
Geurten, Marie ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege

in Aging and Mental Health (2021), 25(1), 142-148

Objectives: Impairments of metacognitive skills represent a critical symptom in Alzheimer Disease (AD) because it frequently results in a lack of self-awareness. However, recent findings suggest that ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Impairments of metacognitive skills represent a critical symptom in Alzheimer Disease (AD) because it frequently results in a lack of self-awareness. However, recent findings suggest that, despite an inability to explicitly estimate their own cognitive functioning, patients might demonstrate some implicit recognition of difficulties. In this study, we tested whether a behavioral dissociation between explicit and implicit measures of metacognition can be found in both healthy older controls (n = 20) and AD patients (n = 20). Methods: Our two groups of participants (AD vs. Controls) were asked to complete a forced-choice perceptual identification test and to explicitly rate their confidence in each decision (i.e., explicit measure of metacognition). Moreover, they also had the opportunity to ask for a cue to help them decide if their response was correct (i.e., implicit measure of metacognition). Results: Data revealed that all participants asked for a cue more often after an incorrect response than after a correct response in the forced-choice identification test, indicating a good ability to implicitly introspect on the results of their cognitive operations. On the contrary, only healthy participants displayed metacognitive sensitivity when making explicit confidence judgments. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that implicit metacognition may be less affected than explicit metacognition in Alzheimer’s disease. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (12 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailFrontal hypometabolism in neurocognitive disorder with behavioral disturbance
Bastin, Christine ULiege; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege; BERNARD, Claire ULiege et al

in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailI remember it like it was yesterday: Age-related differences in the subjective experience of remembering
Folville, Adrien ULiege; Simons, Jon S.; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege et al

in Psychonomic Bulletin and Review (2021)

It has been frequently described that older adults subjectively report the vividness of their memories as being as high, or even higher, than young adults, despite poorer objective memory performance ... [more ▼]

It has been frequently described that older adults subjectively report the vividness of their memories as being as high, or even higher, than young adults, despite poorer objective memory performance. Here, we review studies that examined age-related differences in the subjective experience of memory vividness. By examining vividness calibration and resolution, studies using different types of approaches converge to suggest that older adults overestimate the intensity of their vividness ratings relative to young adults, and that they rely on retrieved memory details to a lesser extent to judge vividness. We discuss potential mechanisms underlying these observations. Inflation of memory vividness with regard to the richness of memory content may stem from age-differences in vividness criterion or scale interpretation and psycho-social factors. The reduced reliance on episodic memory details in older adults may stem from age-related differences in how they monitor these details to make their vividness ratings. Considered together, these findings emphasize the importance of examining age-differences in memory vividness using different analytical methods and they provide valuable evidence that the subjective experience of remembering is more than the reactivation of memory content. In this vein, we recommend that future studies explore the links between memory vividness and other subjective memory scales (e.g., ratings of details or memory confidence) in healthy aging and/or other populations, as it could be used as a window to better characterize the cognitive processes that underpin the subjective assessment of the quality of recollected events. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailFamiliarity in Mild Cognitive Impairment as a function of patients’ clinical outcome four years later
Bastin, Christine ULiege; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege; Giacomelli, Fabrice ULiege et al

in Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders (2021), 35(4), 321-326

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailAnosognosia in Mild Cognitive Impairment: Lack of awareness of memory difficulties characterizes prodromal Alzheimer’s disease
Bastin, Christine ULiege; Giacomelli, Fabrice; Miévis, Frédéric et al

in Frontiers in Psychiatry (2021), 12

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailPositive Effect of Cognitive Reserve on Episodic Memory, Executive and Attentional Functions Taking Into Account Amyloid-Beta, Tau, and Apolipoprotein E Status
Narbutas, Justinas ULiege; Chylinski, Daphné ULiege; Van Egroo, Maxime et al

in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience (2021), 13

Studies exploring the simultaneous influence of several physiological and environmental factors on domain-specific cognition in late middle-age remain scarce. Therefore, our objective was to determine the ... [more ▼]

Studies exploring the simultaneous influence of several physiological and environmental factors on domain-specific cognition in late middle-age remain scarce. Therefore, our objective was to determine the respective contribution of modifiable risk/protective factors (cognitive reserve and allostatic load) on specific cognitive domains (episodic memory, executive functions, and attention), taking into account non-modifiable factors [sex, age, and genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD)] and AD-related biomarker amount (amyloid-beta and tau/neuroinflammation) in a healthy late-middle-aged population. One hundred and one healthy participants (59.4 ± 5 years; 68 women) were evaluated for episodic memory, executive and attentional functioning via neuropsychological test battery. Cognitive reserve was determined by the National Adult Reading Test. The allostatic load consisted of measures of lipid metabolism and sympathetic nervous system functioning. The amyloid-beta level was assessed using positron emission tomography in all participants, whereas tau/neuroinflammation positron emission tomography scans and apolipoprotein E genotype were available for 58 participants. Higher cognitive reserve was the main correlate of better cognitive performance across all domains. Moreover, age was negatively associated with attentional functioning, whereas sex was a significant predictor for episodic memory, with women having better performance than men. Finally, our results did not show clear significant associations between performance over any cognitive domain and apolipoprotein E genotype and AD biomarkers. This suggests that domain-specific cognition in late healthy midlife is mainly determined by a combination of modifiable (cognitive reserve) and non-modifiable factors (sex and age) rather than by AD biomarkers and genetic risk for AD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (9 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailAssociations between cognitive complaints, memory performance, mood and amyloid-β accumulation in healthy amyloid negative late-midlife individuals
Narbutas, Justinas ULiege; Van Egroo, Maxime; Chylinski, Daphné ULiege et al

in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (2021), 83

Background. Cognitive complaints are gaining more attention as they may represent an early marker of increased risk for AD in individuals without objective decline at standard neuropsychological ... [more ▼]

Background. Cognitive complaints are gaining more attention as they may represent an early marker of increased risk for AD in individuals without objective decline at standard neuropsychological examination. Objective. Our aim was to assess whether cognitive complaints in late middle-aged individuals not seeking medical help are related to objective cognitive outcomes known as early markers for AD risk, concomitant affective state, and amyloid-β (Aβ) burden. Methods. Eighty-seven community-based cognitively normal individuals aged 50-69 years underwent neuropsychological assessment for global cognition, using Preclinical Alzheimer’s Cognitive Composite 5 (PACC5) score, and a more specific episodic memory measure. Affective state was based on self-assessment questionnaires for depression and anxiety. Aβ PET burden was assessed via [18F]Flutemetamol (N=84) and [18F]Florbetapir (N=3) uptake. Cognitive complaints were evaluated using Cognitive Difficulties Scale. Results. Higher cognitive complaints were significantly associated with lower episodic memory performance and worse affective state. Moreover, higher level of cognitive complaints was related to higher (but still sub-clinical) global Aβ accumulation (at uncorrected significance level). Importantly, all three aspects remained significant when taken together in the same statistical model, indicating that they explained distinct parts of variance. Conclusion. In healthy Aβ negative late middle-aged individuals, a higher degree of cognitive complaints is associated with lower episodic memory efficiency, more anxiety and depression, as well as, potentially, with higher Aβ burden, suggesting that complaints might signal subtle decline. Future studies should untangle how cognitive complaints in healthy aging populations are related to longitudinal changes in objective cognition and AD biomarker correlates. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailHeterogeneity in the links between sleep arousals, amyloid-beta and cognition
Chylinski, Daphné ULiege; Van Egroo, Maxime; Narbutas, Justinas ULiege et al

in JCI Insight (2021)

BACKGROUND. Tight relationships between sleep quality, cognition and amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology, emerge in the literature. Sleep arousals become ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND. Tight relationships between sleep quality, cognition and amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology, emerge in the literature. Sleep arousals become more prevalent with ageing and are considered to reflect poorer sleep quality. Yet, heterogeneity in arousals has been suggested while their associations with Aβ and cognition are not established. METHODS. We recorded undisturbed night-time sleep with EEG in 101 healthy individuals in late midlife (50-70y), devoid of cognitive and sleep disorders. We classified spontaneous arousals according to their association with muscular tone increase (M+/M-) and sleep stage transition (T+/T-). We assessed cortical Aβ burden over earliest affected regions via PET imaging, and cognition via extensive neuropsychological testing. RESULTS. Arousal types differed in their oscillatory composition in theta and beta EEG bands. Furthermore, T+M- arousals, which interrupt sleep continuity, were positively linked to Aβ burden (p=.0053, R²β*=0.08). By contrast, more prevalent T-M+ arousals, upholding sleep continuity, were associated with lower Aβ burden (p=.0003, R²β*=0.13), and better cognition, particularly over the attentional domain (p<.05, R²β*≥0.04). CONCLUSION. Contrasting with what is commonly accepted, we provide empirical evidence that arousals are diverse and differently associated with early AD-related neuropathology and cognition. This suggests that sleep arousals, and their coalescence with other brain oscillations during sleep, may actively contribute to the beneficial functions of sleep. This warrants re-evaluation of age-related sleep changes and suggests that spontaneous arousals could constitute a marker of favourable brain and cognitive health trajectories. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailDiagnostic performance of automated MRI volumetry by icobrain dm for Alzheimer’s disease in a clinical setting: a REMEMBER study
Wittens, M.M.J.; Sima, D.M.; Houbrechts, R. et al

in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (2021), 83

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailA role of BDNF polymorphism in age-related recognition memory processes?
Apa, Zoltan ULiege; Requier, Florence ULiege; Angel, Lucie et al

Poster (2020, May 27)

Episodic memory difficulties are frequently encountered in normal aging. However, the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genetic polymorphism on decreased memory performance remains ... [more ▼]

Episodic memory difficulties are frequently encountered in normal aging. However, the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genetic polymorphism on decreased memory performance remains largely unclear. BDNF plays a key role in neuronal growth as well as neuronal survival, and has a significant involvement in synaptic processes of memory. Consequently, we have examined the concurrent effect of BDNF genetic polymorphism on recognition performance in young and old adults carrying Val(val/val) and Met (val/met and me/met) alleles of the gene. Our participants were selected form a larger cohort, which provided with blood sample for genetic information extraction and completed a recognition memory task (old/new judgements following an encoding phase in which pictures were presented once or twice) in an fMRI setting. Our final sample consisted of 106 participants. Specifically, the groups were constituted of 56 healthy old adults (age 60-75 years, M=65.6 years) and 50 young adults (age 19-30 years, M=23.8 years), with 28 young and 32 old BDNF Val allele carriers, 22 young and 24 old Met allele carriers. Composite percentage scores were calculated by computing the percentage scores of hits, false alarms, correct rejections and omissions between the groups. Between-group and BDNF differences were assessed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) on these measures. We observed significant group effects for the number of correct rejections (young>old) and false alarms (old>young). However, no main or interaction genetic effects were observed. These data seems suggest that BDNF polymorphism does not have a significant effect on recognition memory performance in aging [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailNear-Death Experience Memories Include More Episodic Components Than Flashbulb Memories
Cassol, Helena ULiege; Bonin, Estelle ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege et al

in Frontiers in Psychology (2020), 11(888),

Memories of near-death experiences (NDEs) are recalled as “realer” than memories of other real or imagined events. Given their rich phenomenology, emotionality and consequentiality, it was hypothesized ... [more ▼]

Memories of near-death experiences (NDEs) are recalled as “realer” than memories of other real or imagined events. Given their rich phenomenology, emotionality and consequentiality, it was hypothesized that they could meet some aspects of the definition of flashbulb memories. We aimed to identify and compare the episodic and non-episodic information provided in verbal recollections of NDE, flashbulb, and control autobiographical memories. The phenomenological characteristics and centrality of the memories were also compared. Twenty-five participants who had lived a NDE in a life-threatening situation were interviewed and completed the Memory Characteristics Questionnaires as well as the Centrality of Event Scale for their NDE, a flashbulb and another autobiographical memory used as control. Overall, transcribed NDE verbal recollections included a higher overall amount of details and more internal/episodic information than control autobiographical and flashbulb memories. Moreover, flashbulb memories were associated to a lower intensity of feelings while remembering and a lower personal importance, and are less reactivated and less susceptible to be remembered from a first person perspective compared to NDE and control autobiographical memories. Finally, NDE memories are the most central memories to experiencers’ identity, followed by control autobiographical and then by flashbulb memories. These findings corroborate previous studies highlighting the impact and uniqueness of NDE memories. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (19 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailAnosognosie: Modèles théoriques et pistes de prise en charge
Bastin, Christine ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege

in Revue de Neuropsychologie (2020), 12(1), 26-34

Anosognosia refers to the lack of knowledge, awareness or recognition of a disease or a deficit. In this paper, we review methods to measure anosognosia, the theoretical models that propose explanations ... [more ▼]

Anosognosia refers to the lack of knowledge, awareness or recognition of a disease or a deficit. In this paper, we review methods to measure anosognosia, the theoretical models that propose explanations about its origin and programs to improve awareness of deficits in brain-damaged patients. The presence of anosognosia can be detected by clinical assessments based on observation, by questionnaires comparing patients’ and their relatives’ evaluation of the patients’ everyday life functioning and cognition, or by measures of accuracy of patients’ prediction about performance. There are three classes of theoretical models about anosognosia: neurocognitive models suggest that cognitive deficits (notably executive and mnemonic) associated with damage to certain brain regions (in particular, the prefrontal cortex) lead to a poor apprehension of current functioning, psychological models evoke denial as a defense mechanism against the threat that deficits represent for the person, and biopsychosocial models propose that anosognosia emerges from the interaction between neuropsychologial deficits, psychological defense mechanism and social influences. Because anosognosia can prevent the patient from seeking help and complying with revalidation programs, to improve awareness of deficits is necessary to maximize the benefit of therapeutic programs. A few revalidation programs have tried to improve awareness of deficits by combining various approaches. The most common approaches are the use of feedback during the performance of an everyday life task and metacognitive training focusing on prediction of performance, self-assessement, and self-discovery of strategies to improve performance. While most programs aiming at improving anosognosia were used in single case studies, a few controlled and randomized trials have shown the efficacy of the programs that allowed patients to better detect errors during tasks and to gain autonomy in everyday life. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 199 (13 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailDeciphering the Relationship between Objective and Subjective Aspects of Recollection in Healthy Aging
Folville, Adrien ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege

in Memory (2020), 28(3), 362-373

Although healthy aging has been related to a decline in recollection as indexed by objective measures, the subjective experience of recollection sometimes remains stable. To date, however, these age ... [more ▼]

Although healthy aging has been related to a decline in recollection as indexed by objective measures, the subjective experience of recollection sometimes remains stable. To date, however, these age-related differences have only been examined using aggregated data across trials. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between subjective and objective measures of recollection on a trial-by-trial basis to determine whether the magnitude of this relationship was similar in young and older adults. Young and older participants were presented with pictures that were associated with descriptive labels at encoding. At retrieval, they were cued with the labels and were asked to rate the vividness of their memory for the associated picture and to recall as many details of the picture as possible. On average, older adults assigned higher vividness ratings but recalled fewer episodic details than young adults. Mixed-effects modeling revealed that the relationship between subjective (vividness) and objective (number of recalled details) recollection across trials was stronger in young than in older participants. These findings provide evidence that older adults not only retrieve fewer episodic details but also rely on these details to a lesser extent than young adults for judging the subjective quality of their memories. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (19 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailHunting down the source: how amnesic patients avoid fluency-based memory errors
Geurten, Marie ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege et al

in Neuropsychology (2020), 34(1), 15-23

Objective: The primary aim of this study was to test whether differences in the ability of amnesic and healthy participants to detect alternative sources of fluency can account for differences observed in ... [more ▼]

Objective: The primary aim of this study was to test whether differences in the ability of amnesic and healthy participants to detect alternative sources of fluency can account for differences observed in the use of fluency as a cue for memory. Method: Patients with severe memory deficits and matched controls were presented with three forced-choice recognition tests. In each test, an external source of fluency was provided by manipulating the perceptual quality of the studied items during the test phase. The detectability of the perceptual manipulation varied in each test (i.e., a 10%, 20%, or 30% contrast reduction were given). Results: The results indicated that all participants were able to rely on fluency when making recognition decisions as long as the perceptual manipulation remained unnoticed. Interestingly, our data also revealed that the level of contrast reduction at which the alternative source is detected differs between healthy controls and amnesic patients. Specifically, patients with amnesia appeared to disqualify fluency as a cue for memory even when the contrast reduction was moderate while healthy participants only disqualified fluency when the contrast reduction was clearly visible. Conclusion: Overall, our results seem to suggest that the ability to use fluency is probably not impaired in amnesia but undergo metacognitive changes resulting in the implementation of explicit or implicit strategies aiming at tracking alternative sources in order to reduce memory errors. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailFluency-Based Memory Decisions in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Matter of Source Detection?
Geurten, Marie ULiege; Willems, Sylvie ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege et al

in Neuropsychology (2020), 34(2), 176-185

Objective: The primary aim of this study was to test whether differences in the ability of patients with Alzheimer Disease (AD) and healthy participants to detect alternative sources of fluency can ... [more ▼]

Objective: The primary aim of this study was to test whether differences in the ability of patients with Alzheimer Disease (AD) and healthy participants to detect alternative sources of fluency can account for differences observed in the use of fluency - i.e., the ease with which information is processed - as a cue for memory. Method: Twenty-two patients with AD and 22 matched controls were presented with three forced-choice visual recognition tests. In each test, an external source of fluency was provided by manipulating the perceptual quality of the items during the test phase. The detectability of the perceptual manipulation varied in each test (i.e., 10%, 20%, or 30% contrast reduction were given). Results: Data indicated that AD patients rely on fluency in a similar extent than older adults as long as they demonstrate intact detection of differences in the perceptual quality of the items. Specifically, it appears that patients’ ability to visually discriminate stimuli differing in terms of their perceptual quality is critical for patients to be able to implement strategies to appropriately use or correctly disqualify fluency during a recognition task. Conclusion: Overall, these findings suggest that the disruption of some basic cognitive processes could prevent AD patients to experience fluency in a similar extent than healthy controls. However, when the ability to detect differences in the perceptual quality of the stimuli was taken into account, patients appeared to be as able as controls to rely on fluency to guide their memory decisions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (19 ULiège)