Publications of Gilles Vandewalle
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See detailRepeatability of ultra-high-resolution Multi-Parametric Mapping across five 7T sites
Sherif, Siya ULiege; Aghaeifar, Ali; pine., Kerrin et al

Conference (2022)

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See detailResolving perceptual rivalry: an ultra-high field 7T fMRI study
Koshmanova, Ekaterina ULiege; Beckers, Elise ULiege; Campbell, Islay ULiege et al

Poster (2021, November 24)

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See detailTimely sleep coupling: phase locked slow wave - spindle pairing is linked to AD neuropathology and forecasts cognitive decline
Chylinski, Daphné ULiege; Van Egroo, Maxime; Narbutas, Justinas ULiege et al

Conference (2021, November 19)

Alteration of sleep quality is a hallmark of the ageing process. The fine-tuned coalescence of elements of sleep microstructure seems to play a pivotal role in cognitive trajectories in ageing. This may ... [more ▼]

Alteration of sleep quality is a hallmark of the ageing process. The fine-tuned coalescence of elements of sleep microstructure seems to play a pivotal role in cognitive trajectories in ageing. This may be of prime clinical importance as a bidirectional detrimental relationship between sleep quality and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology emerges in the literature and holds promise for novel sleep related interventions. However, sleep is not yet established as a true risk factor for AD, most likely because the understanding of its core associations with AD neuropathology remains insufficient. In this context, we focused on the timely coupling of two key graphoelements of Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep that is slow waves and spindles, and their associations with AD neuropathology and cognition. We show, in a detailed large dataset (N=100; 68 woman) of undisturbed sleep recorded in late middle-aged healthy individuals (50 to 70y; 60 +- 5), that the precise coupling of sleep spindles with a specific category of sleep slow waves, those deemed most important for memory consolidation, is associated to lower medial prefrontal cortex PET-scan β-Amyloid burden, a landmark of AD neuropathology (F1,96=6.2, p=0.014). Cruder aspects of sleep macrostructure and sleep intensity were, however, not significantly linked to β-Amyloid burden in this relatively young sample with low β-Amyloid deposit. We further show that this specific coupling is predictive of a lower memory decline, assessed over 2 years using a task highly sensitive to the first signs of memory impairment (F1,54=4.67, p=0.035). These findings unravel early links between sleep, AD-related and cognitive trajectories in ageing and suggest that altered coupling of sleep microstructure elements key to its functions could constitute the first association with AD neuropathology and that less refined measures of sleep macrostructure or sleep intensity may only be significantly associated to AD neuropathology later in life, when β-amyloid burden is higher. Sleep microstructure integrity could therefore constitute a potential indicator of a less successful ageing trajectory. [less ▲]

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See detailAlzheimer’s disease genetic risk and sleep phenotypes: association with more slow-waves and daytime sleepiness
Muto, Vincenzo ULiege; Koshmanova, Ekaterina ULiege; Ghaemmaghami Tabrizi, Pouya ULiege et al

in Sleep (2021), 44(1), 137

Study objectives: Sleep disturbances and genetic variants have been identified as risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Our goal was to assess whether genome-wide polygenic risk scores (PRS) for AD ... [more ▼]

Study objectives: Sleep disturbances and genetic variants have been identified as risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Our goal was to assess whether genome-wide polygenic risk scores (PRS) for AD associate with sleep phenotypes in young adults, decades before typical AD symptom onset. Methods: We computed whole-genome Polygenic Risk Scores (PRS) for AD and extensively phenotyped sleep under different sleep conditions, including baseline sleep, recovery sleep following sleep deprivation and extended sleep opportunity, in a carefully selected homogenous sample of healthy 363 young men (22.1 y ± 2.7) devoid of sleep and cognitive disorders. Results: AD PRS was associated with more slow wave energy, i.e. the cumulated power in the 0.5-4 Hz EEG band, a marker of sleep need, during habitual sleep and following sleep loss, and potentially with large slow wave sleep rebound following sleep deprivation. Furthermore, higher AD PRS was correlated with higher habitual daytime sleepiness. Conclusions: These results imply that sleep features may be associated with AD liability in young adults, when current AD biomarkers are typically negative, and the notion that quantifying sleep alterations may be useful in assessing the risk for developing AD. [less ▲]

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See detailMultimodal exploration of the link between sleep-wake regulation and Alzheimer's disease
Vandewalle, Gilles ULiege

Scientific conference (2021, June 14)

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See detailMultimodal exploration of the link between sleep-wake regulation and Alzheimer's disease
Vandewalle, Gilles ULiege

Scientific conference (2021, May 26)

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See detailSommeil, humeur et apprentissage: un peu de science et des bons conseils pour mieux dormir
Vandewalle, Gilles ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2021)

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See detailENIGMA-Sleep: Challenges, opportunities, and the road map
Tahmasian, Masoud; Aleman, André; Andreassen, Ole A. et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2021), e13347

Neuroimaging and genetics studies have advanced our understanding of the neurobiology of sleep and its disorders. However, individual studies usually have limitations to identifying consistent and ... [more ▼]

Neuroimaging and genetics studies have advanced our understanding of the neurobiology of sleep and its disorders. However, individual studies usually have limitations to identifying consistent and reproducible effects, including modest sample sizes, heterogeneous clinical characteristics and varied methodologies. These issues call for a large-scale multi-centre effort in sleep research, in order to increase the number of samples, and harmonize the methods of data collection, preprocessing and analysis using pre-registered well-established protocols. The Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) consortium provides a powerful collaborative framework for combining datasets across individual sites. Recently, we have launched the ENIGMA-Sleep working group with the collaboration of several institutes from 15 countries to perform large-scale worldwide neuroimaging and genetics studies for better understanding the neurobiology of impaired sleep quality in population-based healthy individuals, the neural consequences of sleep deprivation, pathophysiology of sleep disorders, as well as neural correlates of sleep disturbances across various neuropsychiatric disorders. In this introductory review, we describe the details of our currently available datasets and our ongoing projects in the ENIGMA-Sleep group, and discuss both the potential challenges and opportunities of a collaborative initiative in sleep medicine. [less ▲]

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See detailTime course of cortical response complexity during extended wakefulness and its differential association with vigilance in young and older individuals
Gaggioni, Giulia ULiege; Shumbayawonda, Elizabeth; Montanaro, Umberto et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2021), epub ahead of print

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See detailCerebral functional networks during sleep in young and older individuals
Daneault, Véronique; Orban, Pierre; Martin, Nicolas et al

in Scientific Reports (2021), 11(1), 4905

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See detailBrain functional MRI responses to blue light stimulation in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy
Evangelisti, Stefania; La Morgia, Chiara; Testa, Claudia et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2021), epub ahead of print

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See detailVariability of sleep stage scoring in late midlife and early old age
Chylinski, Daphné ULiege; Berthomier, Christian; Lambot, Eric ULiege et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2021)

Sleep stage scoring can lead to important inter-expert variability. Although likely, whether this issue is amplified in older populations, which show alterations of sleep electrophysiology, has not been ... [more ▼]

Sleep stage scoring can lead to important inter-expert variability. Although likely, whether this issue is amplified in older populations, which show alterations of sleep electrophysiology, has not been thoroughly assessed. Algorithms for automatic sleep stage scoring may appear ideal to eliminate inter-expert variability. Yet, variability between human experts and algorithm sleep stage scoring in healthy older individuals has not been investigated. Here, we aimed to compare stage scoring of older individuals and hypothesized that variability, whether between experts or considering the algorithm, would be higher than usually reported in the literature. Twenty cognitively normal and healthy late midlife individuals’ (61 ± 5 years; 10 women) night-time sleep recordings were scored by two experts from different research centres and one algorithm. We computed agreements for the entire night (percentage and Cohen's κ) and each sleep stage. Whole-night pairwise agreements were relatively low and ranged from 67% to 78% (κ, 0.54–0.67). Sensitivity across pairs of scorers proved lowest for stages N1 (8.2%–63.4%) and N3 (44.8%–99.3%). Significant differences between experts and/or algorithm were found for total sleep time, sleep efficiency, time spent in N1/N2/N3 and wake after sleep onset (p ≤ 0.005), but not for sleep onset latency, rapid eye movement (REM) and slow-wave sleep (SWS) duration (N2 + N3). Our results confirm high inter-expert variability in healthy aging. Consensus appears good for REM and SWS, considered as a whole. It seems more difficult for N3, potentially because human raters adapt their interpretation according to overall changes in sleep characteristics. Although the algorithm does not substantially reduce variability, it would favour time-efficient standardization. [less ▲]

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See detailPositive Effect of Cognitive Reserve on Episodic Memory, Executive and Attentional Functions Taking Into Account Amyloid-Beta, Tau, and Apolipoprotein E Status
Narbutas, Justinas ULiege; Chylinski, Daphné ULiege; Van Egroo, Maxime et al

in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience (2021), 13

Studies exploring the simultaneous influence of several physiological and environmental factors on domain-specific cognition in late middle-age remain scarce. Therefore, our objective was to determine the ... [more ▼]

Studies exploring the simultaneous influence of several physiological and environmental factors on domain-specific cognition in late middle-age remain scarce. Therefore, our objective was to determine the respective contribution of modifiable risk/protective factors (cognitive reserve and allostatic load) on specific cognitive domains (episodic memory, executive functions, and attention), taking into account non-modifiable factors [sex, age, and genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD)] and AD-related biomarker amount (amyloid-beta and tau/neuroinflammation) in a healthy late-middle-aged population. One hundred and one healthy participants (59.4 ± 5 years; 68 women) were evaluated for episodic memory, executive and attentional functioning via neuropsychological test battery. Cognitive reserve was determined by the National Adult Reading Test. The allostatic load consisted of measures of lipid metabolism and sympathetic nervous system functioning. The amyloid-beta level was assessed using positron emission tomography in all participants, whereas tau/neuroinflammation positron emission tomography scans and apolipoprotein E genotype were available for 58 participants. Higher cognitive reserve was the main correlate of better cognitive performance across all domains. Moreover, age was negatively associated with attentional functioning, whereas sex was a significant predictor for episodic memory, with women having better performance than men. Finally, our results did not show clear significant associations between performance over any cognitive domain and apolipoprotein E genotype and AD biomarkers. This suggests that domain-specific cognition in late healthy midlife is mainly determined by a combination of modifiable (cognitive reserve) and non-modifiable factors (sex and age) rather than by AD biomarkers and genetic risk for AD. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociations between cognitive complaints, memory performance, mood and amyloid-β accumulation in healthy amyloid negative late-midlife individuals
Narbutas, Justinas ULiege; Van Egroo, Maxime; Chylinski, Daphné ULiege et al

in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (2021), 83

Background. Cognitive complaints are gaining more attention as they may represent an early marker of increased risk for AD in individuals without objective decline at standard neuropsychological ... [more ▼]

Background. Cognitive complaints are gaining more attention as they may represent an early marker of increased risk for AD in individuals without objective decline at standard neuropsychological examination. Objective. Our aim was to assess whether cognitive complaints in late middle-aged individuals not seeking medical help are related to objective cognitive outcomes known as early markers for AD risk, concomitant affective state, and amyloid-β (Aβ) burden. Methods. Eighty-seven community-based cognitively normal individuals aged 50-69 years underwent neuropsychological assessment for global cognition, using Preclinical Alzheimer’s Cognitive Composite 5 (PACC5) score, and a more specific episodic memory measure. Affective state was based on self-assessment questionnaires for depression and anxiety. Aβ PET burden was assessed via [18F]Flutemetamol (N=84) and [18F]Florbetapir (N=3) uptake. Cognitive complaints were evaluated using Cognitive Difficulties Scale. Results. Higher cognitive complaints were significantly associated with lower episodic memory performance and worse affective state. Moreover, higher level of cognitive complaints was related to higher (but still sub-clinical) global Aβ accumulation (at uncorrected significance level). Importantly, all three aspects remained significant when taken together in the same statistical model, indicating that they explained distinct parts of variance. Conclusion. In healthy Aβ negative late middle-aged individuals, a higher degree of cognitive complaints is associated with lower episodic memory efficiency, more anxiety and depression, as well as, potentially, with higher Aβ burden, suggesting that complaints might signal subtle decline. Future studies should untangle how cognitive complaints in healthy aging populations are related to longitudinal changes in objective cognition and AD biomarker correlates. [less ▲]

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