Publications of Bruno Frère
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailOù est passé la justice sociale
Frère, Bruno ULiege

in Revue française de sciences politiques (2021), 71

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (9 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailrepenser l’émancipation.
Frère, Bruno ULiege; Laville, Jean-Louis

Book published by à définir (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailBölüm on Pierre Bourdieu’nün sosyolojîk kurmacasi: habîtus’un fenomenolojîk bîr yorumu
Frère, Bruno ULiege

in Susen, Simon (Ed.) ierre Bourdieu’nün Mirası Ele􏱪tirel Söylemler (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailPrendre le temps du soin politique. Coronavirus et objection de croissance
Frère, Bruno ULiege

Article for general public (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLe covid 19, une maladie de croissance
Frère, Bruno ULiege

Article for general public (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailExtrapolation ! Phenomenology, sociology of critique and state of mind in the solidarity economy
Frère, Bruno ULiege

in Sociologica del Lavoro (2020), 158(3), 21-47

The aim of this theoretic paper is to demonstrate the value of French sociology of critique as a post-Bourdieusian critical sociology. Against interpretations of justifications as cultural tool kits ... [more ▼]

The aim of this theoretic paper is to demonstrate the value of French sociology of critique as a post-Bourdieusian critical sociology. Against interpretations of justifications as cultural tool kits unconsciously mobilized by actors, we suggest that its notion of ‘grammar’ is useful to articulate the normative moral macro-elements that motivate local actions and justifications. In a second time, phenomenology helps us to understand at a deeper level those justifications as expressions of fundamental ways of relating to the world. In this sense phenomenology is useful to a moral sociology of critique because it helps to find solution to the possible contradiction between justification and action that sociology of critique left unsolved, as we will see by an empirical example called up in the field of solidarity economy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailMai 68 et les sciences sociales : la lutte continue
Frère, Bruno ULiege; fontaine, sebastien; Italiano, Patrick ULiege

Book published by Presses de l'uliège (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailThe impasse of European critical theory: Attempts at a pragmatic sociology renewal
Frère, Bruno ULiege; Karakostaki, Charitini ULiege; Tulle, Emmanuelle

in e-Legal : Revue de Droit et de Criminologie de l'Université Libre de Bruxelles (2020), 4

Many significant intellectual developments have taken place in 20th century European social theories. Notably the first Frankfurt School and Bourdieu’s work have successfully shown how workers, social ... [more ▼]

Many significant intellectual developments have taken place in 20th century European social theories. Notably the first Frankfurt School and Bourdieu’s work have successfully shown how workers, social actors, etc. are alienated or dominated by capitalist social structures. But according to Habermas, neither perspective successfully allows for the possibility that people could contribute to their own emancipation. The emergence of new forms of social resistance to domination such as those embodied by the Indignados, Anonymous, Femen, the practitioners of alternative economy, movements of unemployed people or illegals compels us to envisage the possibility for emancipation, but how? In this paper we explore opportunities for accounting for this by considering the work of a range of other European social theorists, more specifically Boltanski whose critical intent is embodied in his pragmatic sociology, and evident in his coining and use of the concept of the world. In addition we will consider Latour’s own pragmatic stance as we believe that despite his disinterest in new social movements, his work, informed by pure immanence, might offer potential solutions. But we would argue that even in these innovations there is either a persistent tendency to imagine emancipation primarily as a return to some ideal state or a lack of critical engagement with alienation. In response, we propose a materialist renewal, which will lead us to ponder on the political role of sociologists. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 360 (23 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailTranscending the transcendental: Towards a constructive critical sociology
Frère, Bruno ULiege; Jaster, Dan

E-print/Working paper (2020)

This article calls for a rethinking of critical sociology. The popular Bourdieusian paradigm effectively highlighted how domination persists, but its negative foundation removes the voices of actors by ... [more ▼]

This article calls for a rethinking of critical sociology. The popular Bourdieusian paradigm effectively highlighted how domination persists, but its negative foundation removes the voices of actors by privileging sociological knowledge as capable of identifying transcendental categories of thought. Latourian critical theory arose in opposition to this privileging, but underplayed the roles of domination and power dynamics, and thus critique. We propose a perspective that evades the transcendental perspective which relies on pure negation but allows critique; a more positive critical sociology. This alternative perspective is founded on processualist, phenomenological, pragmatic, and utopian perspectives, which levels the distinction between social scientists and social actors. Focusing on process, not privileged knowledge of transcendental truths, emphasizes actors’ own critical capacities: critical scholars do not dominate, but help actors build better worlds based on their own perspectives and pasts. Thus, critical sociology does not negate actors, reducing them to unconscious reifiers, but recognizes that people utilize their pasts to challenge power structures and create better futures based on their imaginations.   [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 165 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailRéenchanter la ville ? Pour une appropriation égalitaire de l’espace public
Brahy, Rachel ULiege; Frère, Bruno ULiege

in Politique, Revue de Débats (2019), 108

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailRéenchanter la ville ? Pour une appropriation égalitaire de l’espace public
Brahy, Rachel ULiege; Frère, Bruno ULiege

Article for general public (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailPositivism
Frère, Bruno ULiege

in Frère, Bruno (Ed.) Wiley Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology, 2nd Edition (2019)

The 19th century was a century represented by its actors as one of irreversible progress – one that the advance of the sciences was driving towards an increasingly developed future. In this future, it was ... [more ▼]

The 19th century was a century represented by its actors as one of irreversible progress – one that the advance of the sciences was driving towards an increasingly developed future. In this future, it was thought, knowledge would allow man to emancipate himself once and for all; he would be freed from the heaviest and most punishing tasks, which would be carried out by machines and other new technologies. The control of fossil fuels allowed for the invention of the train, and electricity appeared, as did photography and the telegraph. Medicine progressed. Scientific research permitted an increasing number of illnesses to be cured and treated through, for example, the first vaccines, which were enabled by Pasteur’s discoveries. Amid this effervescence, science found itself placed at the centre of all scholarly thought, ripe for theorisation. The advances of chemistry, physics and biology fascinated those who Honneth has rightly called philosophers of the social (1994). And at the time, more than one of these philosophers envisaged the application of natural science’s methods to the study of human societies. The idea that it is possible to identify the principal natural laws that govern the development of human groups – just like it is possible to identify the laws that govern the physical world (in order to control it) – gained ground. Saint-Simon (1760-1825), envisaged a social physiology whose task would be to observe social phenomena as we observe natural phenomena. But it was Auguste Comte (1798-1857) who, theorising what we still understand today as sociology, would endorse the particular stand of social philosophy that constituted positivism. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 839 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
See detail“Politics without politics”: Affordances and limitations of the solidarity economy’s libertarian socialist grammar.
Frère, Bruno ULiege

in The Everyday Resistance. French Activism at the Beginning of the 21th Century (2019)

The “solidarity economy” is generally thought of as comprising four distinct classes of activity: community services consultancy, microfinance, Local Exchange Trading Systems (LETS), community services ... [more ▼]

The “solidarity economy” is generally thought of as comprising four distinct classes of activity: community services consultancy, microfinance, Local Exchange Trading Systems (LETS), community services and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). Because they try to emphasise the citizen’s activism, these solidarity initiatives are thought to be deeply political in the philosophical sense of the term. But today an important question arises regarding the kind of formal political institution that might speak in the name of all these initiatives. Some commentators see solidarity initiatives as new economic models with the potential to solve the ethical impasse of advanced capitalism. They are eager for academic researchers and movement leaders to reach consensus about the kind of concrete political identity such initiatives may be expected to generate. My research examines the failure to move from micro-level initiatives to an overarching “macro” political entity. This chapter, using the insights of pragmatic sociology, aims to understand how the obstacles to this goal are rooted in the libertarian socialist grammar of the solidarity economy itself. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailconclusion of The everyday resistance
Frère, Bruno ULiege; Jacquemain, Marc ULiege

Book published by Palgrave MacMillan (2019)

The historic power of the workers’ movement, inspired by Marx, was to “name” its shared condition of existence, the substrate of the multitude of injustices of which wage-earners, principally, were ... [more ▼]

The historic power of the workers’ movement, inspired by Marx, was to “name” its shared condition of existence, the substrate of the multitude of injustices of which wage-earners, principally, were victims: exploitation. The strength of this movement, which since the 19th century has made it possible to achieve so much in the social sphere, was precisely that it was fuelled by individuals driven by their shared experience to unite with a shared voice, beyond their neighbourhoods or their factories. Today, recognising shared reasons to struggle is not so simple in an extremely heterogeneous wage-earning society, which extends from the best-protected to the most precarious and encompasses a large part of the income spectrum. There is a great temptation to leave real political power in the hands of the (capitalist) institutions in order to content themselves with the modest and ordinary – but often more immediately effective – politics of the nearby. But this does not mean that the new precariat (Standing) all around the world is not active. It changes the world locally and is willing to be gathered in a new common imaginary, gathering working social movements and contemporary minorities social movements. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailOrdinary Resistance to Masculine Domination in a Civil Disobedience Movement
Cervera-Marzal, Manuel ULiege; Frère, Bruno ULiege

in Frère, Bruno; Jacquemain, Marc (Eds.) Everyday Resistance. French Activism at the Beginning of 21th Century (2019)

How can an activist organisation that adheres to feminist values and engages in antisexist actions strengthen masculine domination within itself? Based on an ethnographic investigation into the anti ... [more ▼]

How can an activist organisation that adheres to feminist values and engages in antisexist actions strengthen masculine domination within itself? Based on an ethnographic investigation into the anti-globalisation group Les Désobéissants (The Disobedients), this chapter examines how masculine domination hierarchises the activist space and how this activist space reconfigures the relations between men and women. By combining the contributions of the sociology of social movements and gender studies, it shows how the sexual division of activist labour and the pervasiveness of sexism in activist circles consolidate male power and privileges. But this domination does not apply equally to each woman and each situation and is not without limits. Female defections and microresistance introduce fissures in the rock of masculine domination. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (9 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLet a thousand flowers bloom? Introduction to The Everyday Resistance. French Activism at the beginning of the 21st century.
Frère, Bruno ULiege; Jacquemain, Marc ULiege

Book published by Palgrave MacMillan (2019)

The societies of Western Europe – “Old Europe”, as George W. Bush’s Secretary of Defence, Donald Rumsfeld, called it – has lived for three full decades through what one might call a “crisis of social ... [more ▼]

The societies of Western Europe – “Old Europe”, as George W. Bush’s Secretary of Defence, Donald Rumsfeld, called it – has lived for three full decades through what one might call a “crisis of social conflict”. That doesn’t necessarily mean that the level of conflict has become lower – even if the hypothesis seems true for a fraction of this period – but rather that the conflict has become less structured and so less easy to grasp. We can say that “today’s world resembles the one in which classical Marxism emerged. In other respects, it is significantly different – above all, no doubt, in the absence of a clearly identified ‘subject of emancipations” (Keucheyan, 2014). This empirical work of identifying “grips” is more indispensable than ever. It is the necessary condition for rearming an effective critique, that is, a critique that dares to be radical but does not mistake its dreams for realities. Texts gathered in this volume suggest new grips by showing how several activist organisations (mainly) in France share a common practical utopia imaginary by trying to change the world here and now. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (19 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailAlternative and Resistance Movements : The Two Faces of Sustainability Transformations
Cervera-Marzal, Manuel ULiege; Pelenc, Jérôme; Frère, Bruno ULiege

in Ecological Economics (2019), 158

The goal of this commentary is to bring to the forefront four majors ideas/hypotheses to stimulate the debate regarding sustainability transitions: (i) we argue that “local environmental resistances” (the ... [more ▼]

The goal of this commentary is to bring to the forefront four majors ideas/hypotheses to stimulate the debate regarding sustainability transitions: (i) we argue that “local environmental resistances” (the environmental justice movement) and “local economic/community alternatives” (the Transition, degrowth and alike movements) constitute the two faces of the same coin i.e. “the great transition toward sustainability” when transition is considered from a citizen, place-based and socio-political perspective; (ii) we argue that both of these two global decentralized movements are place-based, they are participating in the emergence of a place-based alterglobalism. Then, the role of place in creating spaces of re-politicization through opposition and experimentation should be acknowledged and more researched; (iii) if resistances and alternatives share some features in common, they also present differences that should be further investigated regarding their empowerment and politicization potential; and (iv) last but not the least, we stress the need for a more incarnated, politicized and place-based approach to “sustainability transitions” thus distancing us from the Transition Management approach. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailFrench Sociological Pragmatism: Inheritor and Innovator in the American Pragmatic and Sociological Phenomenological Traditions
Frère, Bruno ULiege; Jaster, Dan

in Journal of Classical Sociology (2019), 19(2),

Philosophical pragmatism has seen a revival within the sociological discourse. We bring three strands of this approach into direct dialogue with one another. Anglophone and German scholars have brought ... [more ▼]

Philosophical pragmatism has seen a revival within the sociological discourse. We bring three strands of this approach into direct dialogue with one another. Anglophone and German scholars have brought pragmatists such as George Herbert Mead back to the forefront of our understandings of social action. In a parallel development, scholars such as Alfred Schütz incorporated Husserlian phenomenology with American pragmatism, reinforcing a specific micro-interactionist model. In Francophone sociology, Luc Boltanski and Laurent Thévenot challenged the hegemonic structuralist approach in the 1980s by developing their own pragmatic framework. In this synthetic review, we illustrate why this recent French pragmatic sociology adds interesting cultural, sociological and psychological dimensions to the American pragmatic and to phenomenological lineages. We then show how these innovations provide a richer understanding of the interaction between individuals and institutions and provide a way to understand something American pragmatists and phenomenological sociologists often struggle to engage with: social conflict. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (11 ULiège)