Publications of Maxime Goffinet
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailA prospective audit of acute ENT activity in a university teaching hospital
Atta, Lucas; Delrez, Sophie ULiege; Asimakopoulos, Asimakis et al

in B-ENT (2019), 15

Introduction and aim: Acute ENT coverage is available out-of-hours in most hospitals. However, increasing pressure to reduce healthcare cost threatens this 24-hour availability. Our goal was to audit the ... [more ▼]

Introduction and aim: Acute ENT coverage is available out-of-hours in most hospitals. However, increasing pressure to reduce healthcare cost threatens this 24-hour availability. Our goal was to audit the emergency ENT activity in our institution. Methods: A prospective audit of all ENT emergency referrals was carried out over a one-month period in an academic hospital. Descriptive statistics were produced for age, sex, origin, admission time, diagnosis, management, and patient outcome. Results: A total of 190 patients (109 men and 81 women) were referred to the ENT emergency service over the study period (mean, 6.1 cases/day). Mean age was 47.9 (SD ±23.6) years. Most admissions (76.4%) occurred during normal working hours, and 62.0% of patients were self-referred. The mean complaint duration before admission was 7.6 (±13.7) days. One third (33.2% patients) required ambulatory treatment, a quarter (24.7% patients) had a minor ENT procedure, 18 (9.5%) required admission to the ward, and 8 (4.2%) required surgical treatment. Severity of diagnosis or management between patients did not differ with referral by a physician (GP or specialist) and self-referral. At 30 days, 3 (1.6%) patients died, 106 (55.8%) benefitted from an ENT follow-up, 65 (34.2%) were referred to another physician (GP or specialist), and 16 (8.4%) were lost to follow-up. Conclusions: The results of this workload audit suggest that emergency ENT activity is justified in our hospital. Restricting emergency ENT cover to patients referred by a GP or another physician would not improve patient selection. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (16 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailRhinologic Emergencies: a Prospective Audit in a University Teaching Hospital
ROGISTER, Florence ULiege; ATTA, Lucas; Delrez, Sophie ULiege et al

Conference (2018, April)

Aims: Increasing pressure to reduce healthcare cost threatens the provision of acute ENT coverage round the clock. Our goal was to audit our emergency rhinologic activity over a one-month period. Methods ... [more ▼]

Aims: Increasing pressure to reduce healthcare cost threatens the provision of acute ENT coverage round the clock. Our goal was to audit our emergency rhinologic activity over a one-month period. Methods: A prospective audit for all emergency ENT referrals was carried out from May 1st to May 31th 2017. Descriptive statistics were produced for age, sex, origin, time of arrival, diagnosis and outcome. A specific subgroup analysis was performed for rhinologic emergencies. A basic cost analysis was ran. Results: Over the study period, 190 patients were referred to the ENT emergency service. Twenty percent patients presented with nose or sinus complaint (36.8% with otological or neuro-vestibular primary complaint, 43.2% with laryngeal or neck complaint). Nose and throat complaints were more likely to present at night or on weekends. Ear complaints were more likely to present during business hours. Rhinologic complaint was more likely to require technical or surgical management than ear or throat complaint. Patients with nose complaint required minor procedure in 43.2% cases (35.6% of the total minor procedures), and required surgical procedure in 13.5% cases. Among the total ENT emergency surgical procedures, 62.5% were rhinologic ones, involving the nose (50%) or the sinus (12.5%). Ear or throat initial complaint were more likely to require no treatment or ambulatory management. Conclusion: The emergency rhinologic activity is justified in our hospital. An initial rhinological complaint was more likely to require specific ENT management than other complaints. ENT cover is an efficient service provision, especially for rhinologic emergencies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (13 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailA Prospective Audit of Acute ENT Activity in a Teaching Hospital.
Goffinet, Maxime ULiege; ATTA, Lucas; Delrez, Sophie ULiege et al

in B-ENT (2018, March 03)

Introduction and aim: Acute ENT coverage is available out-of-hours in most hospitals. However, increasing pressure to reduce healthcare cost threatens this service provision round the clock. Our goal was ... [more ▼]

Introduction and aim: Acute ENT coverage is available out-of-hours in most hospitals. However, increasing pressure to reduce healthcare cost threatens this service provision round the clock. Our goal was to audit the emergency ENT activity in our institution over a one-month period Material and methods: a prospective audit for all ENT referrals from the emergency department was carried out from May 1st to May 31th 2017. Descriptive statistics were produced for age, sex, origin, time of arrival, diagnosis and patient outcome. Results: a total of 190 patients (109 men and 81 women) were referred to the ENT emergency service over the study period (mean 6.1 case per day). Mean age was 47.9 (±23.6)year (range 1-95). Most patients were ambulatory (75.8%) and came from the area. Most admissions occurred during normal working hours (76.4%) and 62.0% patients came by self reference. The mean complaint duration before admission was 7.6 (±13.7) days (range 0-92 days). One third (33.2% patients) required ambulatory treatment. A quarter (24.7% patients) underwent a minor ENT procedure. Eighteen (9.5%) patients required admission to the ward (mostly for intravenous antibiotic). Eight patients (4.2%) required surgical treatment. There was no difference in the severity of diagnosis or management between patients referred by a physician (GP of specialist) and patients presenting spontaneously. At 30 days, 3 (1.6%) patients died (one of ENT cancer, two of unrelated cause), 106 (55.8%) benefited from an ENT follow’up, 65 (34.2%) were referred to another physician (GP or specialist), 16 (8.4%) were lost to follow’up. Conclusions: The workload suggests that emergency ENT activity is justified in our hospital. Restricting emergency ENT cover to patients referred by a GP or another physician would not allow for a better patient selection. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 109 (19 ULiège)