Publications of Jean-Hubert CABERG
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See detailTranscriptome wide analysis of natural antisense transcripts shows potential role in breast cancer
Wenric, Stéphane ULiege; El Guendi, Sonia ULiege; CABERG, Jean-Hubert ULiege et al

Poster (2017, May)

Non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) represent at least 1/5 of the mammalian transcript amount, and about 90% of the genome length is actively transcribed. Many ncRNAs have been demonstrated to play a role in cancer ... [more ▼]

Non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) represent at least 1/5 of the mammalian transcript amount, and about 90% of the genome length is actively transcribed. Many ncRNAs have been demonstrated to play a role in cancer. Among them, natural antisense transcripts (NAT) are RNA sequences which are complementary and overlapping to those of protein-coding transcripts (PCT). NATs were punctually described as regulating gene expression, and are expected to act more frequently in cis than other ncRNAs that commonly function in trans. In this work, 22 breast cancers expressing estrogen receptors and their paired healthy tissues were analyzed by strand-specific RNA sequencing. To highlight the potential role of NATs in gene regulations occurring in breast cancer, three different gene extraction methods were used: differential expression analysis of NATs between tumor and healthy tissues, differential correlation analysis of paired NAT/PCT between tumor and healthy tissues, and NAT/PCT read count ratio variation between tumor and healthy tissues. Each of these methods yielded lists of NAT/PCT pairs that were demonstrated to be enriched in survival-associated genes on an independent cohort (TCGA). This work allows to highlight NAT lists that display a strong potential to affect the expression of genes involved in the breast cancer pathology. [less ▲]

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See detailSomatic mosaicism is implicated in the etiology of XLAG syndrome
Rostomyan, Liliya ULiege; Daly, Adrian ULiege; Yuan, Bo et al

in Abstract book : Symposium "Perspectives in Endocrinology" (2017, January)

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See detailExome copy number variation detection: Use of a pool of unrelated healthy tissue as reference sample
Wenric, Stéphane ULiege; Sticca, Tiberio ULiege; CABERG, Jean-Hubert ULiege et al

in Genetic Epidemiology (2017)

An increasing number of bioinformatic tools designed to detect CNVs (copy number variants) in tumor samples based on paired exome data where a matched healthy tissue constitutes the reference have been ... [more ▼]

An increasing number of bioinformatic tools designed to detect CNVs (copy number variants) in tumor samples based on paired exome data where a matched healthy tissue constitutes the reference have been published in the recent years. The idea of using a pool of unrelated healthy DNA as reference has previously been formulated but not thoroughly validated. As of today, the gold standard for CNV calling is still aCGH but there is an increasing interest in detecting CNVs by exome sequencing. We propose to design a metric allowing the comparison of two CNV profiles, independently of the technique used and assessed the validity of using a pool of unrelated healthy DNA instead of a matched healthy tissue as reference in exome-based CNV detection. We compared the CNV profiles obtained with three different approaches (aCGH, exome sequencing with a matched healthy tissue as reference, exome sequencing with a pool of eight unrelated healthy tissue as reference) on three multiple myeloma samples. We show that the usual analyses performed to compare CNV profiles (deletion/amplification ratios and CNV size distribution) lack in precision when confronted with low LRR values, as they only consider the binary status of each CNV. We show that the metric-based distance constitutes a more accurate comparison of two CNV profiles. Based on these analyses, we conclude that a reliable picture of CNV alterations in multiple myeloma samples can be obtained from whole-exome sequencing in the absence of a matched healthy sample. [less ▲]

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See detailGenomic Studies of Multiple Myeloma Reveal an Association between X Chromosome Alterations and Genomic Profile Complexity.
Sticca, Tiberio ULiege; CABERG, Jean-Hubert ULiege; Wenric, Stéphane ULiege et al

in Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer (2017), 56

The genomic profile of multiple myeloma (MM) has prognostic value by dividing patients into a good prognosis hyperdiploid group and a bad prognosis non-hyperdiploid group with a higher incidence of IgH ... [more ▼]

The genomic profile of multiple myeloma (MM) has prognostic value by dividing patients into a good prognosis hyperdiploid group and a bad prognosis non-hyperdiploid group with a higher incidence of IgH translocations. This classification, however, is inadequate and many other parameters like mutations, epigenetic modifications and genomic heterogeneity may influence the prognosis. We performed a genomic study by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) on a cohort of 162 patients to evaluate the frequency of genomic gains and losses. We identified a high frequency of X chromosome alterations leading to partial Xq duplication, often associated with Xi deletion in female patients. This partial X duplication could be a cytogenetic marker of aneuploidy as it is correlated with a high number of chromosomal breakages. Patient with high level of chromosomal breakage had reduced survival regardless the region implicated. A higher transcriptional level was shown for genes with potential implication in cancer and located in this altered region. Among these genes, IKBKG and IRAK1 are members of the NFKB pathway which plays an important role in MM and is a target for specific treatments. [less ▲]

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See detailTranscriptome-wide analysis of natural antisense transcripts shows their potential role in breast cancer.
Wenric, Stéphane ULiege; ElGuendi, Sonia; CABERG, Jean-Hubert ULiege et al

in Scientific Reports (2017), 7(1), 17452

Non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) represent 1/5 of the mammalian transcript number, and 90% of the genome length is transcribed. Many ncRNAs play a role in cancer. Among them, non-coding natural antisense ... [more ▼]

Non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) represent 1/5 of the mammalian transcript number, and 90% of the genome length is transcribed. Many ncRNAs play a role in cancer. Among them, non-coding natural antisense transcripts (ncNAT) are RNA sequences that are complementary and overlapping to those of either protein-coding (PCT) or non-coding transcripts. Several ncNATs were described as regulating protein coding gene expression on the same loci, and they are expected to act more frequently in cis compared to other ncRNAs that commonly function in trans. In this work, 22 breast cancers expressing estrogen receptors and their paired adjacent non-malignant tissues were analyzed by strand-specific RNA sequencing. To highlight ncNATs potentially playing a role in protein coding gene regulations that occur in breast cancer, three different data analysis methods were used: differential expression analysis of ncNATs between tumor and non-malignant tissues, differential correlation analysis of paired ncNAT/PCT between tumor and non-malignant tissues, and ncNAT/PCT read count ratio variation between tumor and non-malignant tissues. Each of these methods yielded lists of ncNAT/PCT pairs that were enriched in survival-associated genes. This work highlights ncNAT lists that display potential to affect the expression of protein-coding genes involved in breast cancer pathology. [less ▲]

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See detailSomatic mosaicism underlies X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) syndrome in sporadic male subjects
Daly, Adrian ULiege; Yuan, Bo; Fina, Frederic et al

in Endocrine-Related Cancer (2016), 23(4), 221-233

Somatic mosaicism has been implicated as a causative mechanism in a number of genetic and genomic disorders. X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) syndrome is a recently characterized genomic form of pediatric ... [more ▼]

Somatic mosaicism has been implicated as a causative mechanism in a number of genetic and genomic disorders. X-linked acrogigantism (XLAG) syndrome is a recently characterized genomic form of pediatric gigantism due to aggressive pituitary tumors that is caused by submicroscopic chromosome Xq26.3 duplications that include GPR101. We studied XLAG syndrome patients (N=18) to determine if somatic mosaicism contributed to the genomic pathophysiology. Eighteen subjects with XLAG syndrome were identified with Xq26.3 duplications using high definition array comparative genome hybridization (HD-aCGH). We noted males with XLAG had a decreased log2 ratio compared with expected values, suggesting potential mosaicism, while females showed no such decrease. As compared with familial male XLAG cases, sporadic males had more marked evidence for mosaicism, with levels of Xq26.3 duplication between 16.1-53.8%. These characteristics were replicated using a novel, personalized breakpoint-junction specific quantification droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique. Using a separate ddPCR technique we studied the feasibility of identifying XLAG syndrome cases in a distinct patient population of 64 unrelated subjects with acromegaly/gigantism and identified one female gigantism patient that had increased copy number variation (CNV) threshold for GPR101 that was subsequently diagnosed as having XLAG syndrome on HD-aCGH. Employing a combination of HD-aCGH and novel ddPCR approaches, we have demonstrated that XLAG syndrome can be caused by variable degrees of somatic mosaicism for duplications at chromosome Xq26.3. Somatic mosaicism was shown to occur in sporadic males but not in females with XLAG syndrome, although the clinical characteristics of the disease were similarly severe in both sexes. [less ▲]

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See detailGPR101 mutations are not a frequent cause of congenital isolated growth hormone deficiency
Castinetti, F; Daly, Adrian ULiege; Stratakis, CA et al

in Hormone and Metabolic Research (2016)

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See detailGrowth hormone releasing hormone excess and blockade in X-LAG syndrome.
Daly, Adrian ULiege; Lysy, Philippe; Defilles, Celine et al

in Endocrine-Related Cancer (2016)

X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly-described form of inheritable pituitary gigantism that begins in early childhood and is usually associated with markedly elevated growth hormone (GH) and ... [more ▼]

X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly-described form of inheritable pituitary gigantism that begins in early childhood and is usually associated with markedly elevated growth hormone (GH) and prolactin secretion by mixed pituitary adenomas/hyperplasia. Microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 including the GPR101 gene cause X-LAG syndrome. In individual cases random GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) levels have been elevated. We performed a series of hormonal profiles in a young female sporadic X-LAG syndrome patient and subsequently undertook in vitro studies of primary pituitary tumor culture following neurosurgical resection. The patient demonstrated consistently elevated circulating GHRH levels throughout preoperative testing, which was accompanied by marked GH and prolactin hypersecretion; GH demonstrated a paradoxical increase following TRH administration. In vitro, the pituitary cells showed baseline GH and prolactin release that was further stimulated by GHRH administration. Co-incubation with GHRH and the GHRH receptor antagonist, acetyl-(D-Arg(2))-GHRH (1-29) amide, blocked the GHRH-induced GH stimulation; the GHRH receptor antagonist alone significantly reduced GH release. Pasireotide, but not octreotide, inhibited GH secretion. A ghrelin receptor agonist and an inverse agonist led to modest, statistically significant increases and decreases in GH secretion, respectively. GHRH hypersecretion can accompany the pituitary abnormalities seen in X-LAG syndrome. These data suggest that the pathology of X-LAG syndrome may include hypothalamic dysregulation of GHRH secretion, which is in keeping with localization of GPR101 in the hypothalamus. Therapeutic blockade of GHRH secretion could represent a way to target the marked hormonal hypersecretion and overgrowth that characterizes X-LAG syndrome. [less ▲]

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See detailEtude moléculaire du gène AIP sur plus de 1400 individus atteints d'adénome hypophysaire
CASTERMANS, Emilie ULiege; Auriemma, R; Rostomyan, Liliya ULiege et al

in Abstract book - Annales d'Endocrinologie - 32ème Congrès de la Société Française d'Endocrinologie (2015, October)

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See detailThe genetic causes of pituitary gigantism
Rostomyan, Liliya ULiege; Daly, Adrian ULiege; PETROSSIANS, Patrick ULiege et al

in Endocrine Abstracts (2015, May)

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See detailX-linked acrogigantism syndrome : Clinical Profile and Therapeutic responses
Beckers, Albert ULiege; Lodish, MB; Trivellin, G et al

in Endocrine-Related Cancer (2015), 22

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See detailArray-CGH analysis in Rwandan patients presenting development delay/intellectual disability with multiple congenital anomalies.
Uwineza, Annette; CABERG, Jean-Hubert ULiege; Hitayezu, Janvier et al

in BMC Medical Genetics (2014), 15(1), 79

BACKGROUND: Array-CGH is considered as the first-tier investigation used to identify copy number variations. Right now, there is no available data about the genetic etiology of patients with development ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Array-CGH is considered as the first-tier investigation used to identify copy number variations. Right now, there is no available data about the genetic etiology of patients with development delay/intellectual disability and congenital malformation in East Africa. METHODS: Array comparative genomic hybridization was performed in 50 Rwandan patients with development delay/intellectual disability and multiple congenital abnormalities, using the Agilent's 180 K microarray platform. RESULTS: Fourteen patients (28%) had a global development delay whereas 36 (72%) patients presented intellectual disability. All patients presented multiple congenital abnormalities. Clinically significant copy number variations were found in 13 patients (26%). Size of CNVs ranged from 0,9 Mb to 34 Mb. Six patients had CNVs associated with known syndromes, whereas 7 patients presented rare genomic imbalances. CONCLUSION: This study showed that CNVs are present in African population and show the importance to implement genetic testing in East-African countries. [less ▲]

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See detailSevere dystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and cardiomyopathy likely caused by a missense mutation in TOR1AIP1.
Dorboz, Imen; Coutelier, Marie; Bertrand, Anne T. et al

in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases (2014), 9(1), 174

BackgroundDystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and cardiomyopathy constitute a rare association.MethodsWe used homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing to determine the mutation, western blot and ... [more ▼]

BackgroundDystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and cardiomyopathy constitute a rare association.MethodsWe used homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing to determine the mutation, western blot and immunolabelling on cultured fibroblasts to demonstrate the lower expression and the mislocalization of the protein.ResultsWe report on a boy born from consanguineous healthy parents, who presented at three years of age with rapidly progressing dystonia, progressive cerebellar atrophy, and dilated cardiomyopathy. We identified regions of homozygosity and performed whole exome sequencing that revealed a homozygous missense mutation in TOR1AIP1. The mutation, absent in controls, results in a change of a highly conserved glutamic acid to alanine. TOR1AIP1 encodes lamina-associated polypeptide 1 (LAP1), a transmembrane protein ubiquitously expressed in the inner nuclear membrane. LAP1 interacts with torsinA, the protein mutated in DYT1-dystonia. In vitro studies in fibroblasts of the patient revealed reduced expression of LAP1 and its mislocalization and aggregation in the endoplasmic reticulum as underlying pathogenic mechanisms.Conclusions and relevanceThe pathogenic role of TOR1AIP1 mutation is supported by a) the involvement of a highly conserved amino acid, b) the absence of the mutation in controls, c) the functional interaction of LAP1 with torsinA, and d) mislocalization of LAP1 in patient cells. Of note, cardiomyopathy has been reported in LAP1-null mice and in patients with the TOR1AIP1 nonsense mutation. Other cases will help delineate the clinical spectrum of LAP1-related mutations. [less ▲]

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See detailGigantism and Acromegaly Due to Xq26 Microduplications and GPR101 Mutation.
Trivellin, Giampaolo; Daly, Adrian ULiege; Faucz, Fabio R. et al

in New England Journal of Medicine (2014)

Background Increased secretion of growth hormone leads to gigantism in children and acromegaly in adults; the genetic causes of gigantism and acromegaly are poorly understood. Methods We performed ... [more ▼]

Background Increased secretion of growth hormone leads to gigantism in children and acromegaly in adults; the genetic causes of gigantism and acromegaly are poorly understood. Methods We performed clinical and genetic studies of samples obtained from 43 patients with gigantism and then sequenced an implicated gene in samples from 248 patients with acromegaly. Results We observed microduplication on chromosome Xq26.3 in samples from 13 patients with gigantism; of these samples, 4 were obtained from members of two unrelated kindreds, and 9 were from patients with sporadic cases. All the patients had disease onset during early childhood. Of the patients with gigantism who did not carry an Xq26.3 microduplication, none presented before the age of 5 years. Genomic characterization of the Xq26.3 region suggests that the microduplications are generated during chromosome replication and that they contain four protein-coding genes. Only one of these genes, GPR101, which encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor, was overexpressed in patients' pituitary lesions. We identified a recurrent GPR101 mutation (p.E308D) in 11 of 248 patients with acromegaly, with the mutation found mostly in tumors. When the mutation was transfected into rat GH3 cells, it led to increased release of growth hormone and proliferation of growth hormone-producing cells. Conclusions We describe a pediatric disorder (which we have termed X-linked acrogigantism [X-LAG]) that is caused by an Xq26.3 genomic duplication and is characterized by early-onset gigantism resulting from an excess of growth hormone. Duplication of GPR101 probably causes X-LAG. We also found a recurrent mutation in GPR101 in some adults with acromegaly. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others.). [less ▲]

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