Publications of Gaëtane HICK
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See detailIntravenous infusion of lidocaine significantly reduces propofol dose for colonoscopy: a randomised placebo-controlled study
Forster, C.; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege; GAST, Pierrette ULiege et al

in British Journal of Anaesthesia (2018), 121(5), 1059-1064

Background: Propofol use during sedation for colonoscopy can result in cardiopulmonary complications. Intravenous lidocaine can alleviate visceral pain and decrease propofol requirements during surgery ... [more ▼]

Background: Propofol use during sedation for colonoscopy can result in cardiopulmonary complications. Intravenous lidocaine can alleviate visceral pain and decrease propofol requirements during surgery. We tested the hypothesis that i.v. lidocaine reduces propofol requirements during colonoscopy and improves post-colonoscopy recovery. Methods: Forty patients undergoing colonoscopy were included in this randomised placebo-controlled study. After titration of propofol to produce unconsciousness, patients were given i.v. lidocaine (1.5 mg kg−1 then 4 mg kg−1 h−1) or the same volume of saline. Sedation was standardised and combined propofol and ketamine. The primary endpoint was propofol requirements. Secondary endpoints were: number of oxygen desaturation episodes, endoscopists’ working conditions, discharge time to the recovery room, post-colonoscopy pain, fatigue. Results: Lidocaine infusion resulted in a significant reduction in propofol requirements: 58 (47) vs 121 (109) mg (P=0.02). Doses of ketamine were similar in the two groups: 19 (2) vs 20 (3) mg in the lidocaine and saline groups, respectively. Number of episodes of oxygen desaturation, endoscopists’ comfort, and times for discharge to the recovery room were similar in both groups. Post-colonoscopy pain (P<0.01) and fatigue (P=0.03) were significantly lower in the lidocaine group. Conclusions: Intravenous infusion of lidocaine resulted in a 50% reduction in propofol dose requirements during colonoscopy. Immediate post-colonoscopy pain and fatigue were also improved by lidocaine. Clinical trial registration: NCT 02784860. © 2018 British Journal of Anaesthesia [less ▲]

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See detailPrise en charge de la douleur en pediatrie apres chirurgie ambulatoire
Hallet, Claude ULiege; Kirsch, Murielle ULiege; Hick, Gaëtane ULiege et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62(11), 679-84

Over the last fifteen years, child's pain has become one of our major concerns. In spite of this evolution, it remains one of the most frequent complications after ambulatory surgery. It is thus essential ... [more ▼]

Over the last fifteen years, child's pain has become one of our major concerns. In spite of this evolution, it remains one of the most frequent complications after ambulatory surgery. It is thus essential to implement all the resources we have at our disposal in order to optimize pain management. This can be obtained by basing our strategy on the concept of multimode analgesia. It is consequently essential that each team can achieve its own quality program; the corollary will be the development of clear recommendations for the parents with a systematic analgesics regulation at home and the possibility to resort to the family doctor or to the ambulatory centre in the event of persistence of pain. [less ▲]

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See detailActualites therapeutiques en anesthesie-reanimation: cap sur l'hopital de jour
Hick, Gaëtane ULiege; Kirsch, Murielle ULiege; Janssens, Marc ULiege et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62(5-6, May-Jun), 272-6

The one day clinic possesses its own structure and organisation; patient management is also specific. Preoperative visit and assessment are programmed at least 48 hours before anesthesia. Preoperative ... [more ▼]

The one day clinic possesses its own structure and organisation; patient management is also specific. Preoperative visit and assessment are programmed at least 48 hours before anesthesia. Preoperative examinations and choice of anesthetic technique (sedation associated with local anesthesia or not, general anesthesia, locoregional anesthesia, or hypnosedation) are discussed and determined depending upon medical history, clinical examination, and type of procedure. General recommandations, instructions about fasting, interruption of some therapies, and introduction of new medication(s) are explained orally and also provided in a written document. New anesthetics and analgesics allow quick awakening and recovery of vital functions, and subsequently rapid hospital discharge. Prevention and aggressive treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting are also a major concern in our anesthesic management of ambulatory patient. [less ▲]

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