Publications of Grégory HANS
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See detailLa transplantation cardiaque : indications actuelles et resultats de l'experience liegeoise.
BRULS, Samuel ULiege; Tchana-Sato, Vincent ULiege; LAVIGNE, Jean-Paul ULiege et al

in Revue medicale de Liege (2020), 75(1), 29-36

Heart transplantation remains undoubtedly the most effective treatment for end-stage heart failure, whatever its cause. Last decade has witnessed significant improvements in terms of morbidity and ... [more ▼]

Heart transplantation remains undoubtedly the most effective treatment for end-stage heart failure, whatever its cause. Last decade has witnessed significant improvements in terms of morbidity and mortality following heart transplant. The 5-year survival rate is now beyond 70 %. However, the shortage of potential donors limits its use and requires strict criteria before listing a candidate for heart transplantation. Herein, we present a review of current indications and results of the heart transplantation program at the University hospital of Liege. [less ▲]

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See detailMisplaced mid-septal infarction aggravating sub aortic obstruction in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy
Radermecker, Maurice ULiege; Dulgheru, Raluca Elena ULiege; Hans, Grégory ULiege et al

in European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging (2019), 20(1), 121

[No abstract available]

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See detailTransfusion needs during liver transplantation at the CHU of Liege (Belgium): characteristics and preoperative predictive factors
PAGE, Isaline ULiege; HANS, Grégory ULiege; DETRY, Olivier ULiege et al

in Transplant International (2015, November), 28(S4), 461272

Introduction: Liver transplantation (LT) can result in significant bleeding requiring transfusion of allogenic blood products, which potentially leads to postoperative morbidity and mortality (1). This ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Liver transplantation (LT) can result in significant bleeding requiring transfusion of allogenic blood products, which potentially leads to postoperative morbidity and mortality (1). This study aimed to determine transfusion needs during LT in our institution and its preoperative predictive factors. Material and Methods: Two hundred LT performed at the CHU Liege between 2006 and 2012 were respectively reviewed (age = 55 ` 11 yo, BMI = 25.5 ` 4.4 kg/m2, F/M = 45/155, MELD score = 19 ` 10). Transfu- sion needs of the different blood products during POD 0, and POD 0–7 were recorded. Parameters associated with the transfusion of more than 2 units of RBC (p ≤ 0.1) were identified using the Kruskal Wallis and chi square tests (table 1). These parameters were then placed into a backward stepwise logistic regression model for the transfusion of more than two units of RBC at POD 0. A p value threshold ≥0.1 was used for leaving the model. Results: Transfusion needs were: RBC = 2[0–4], FFP = 4[2–7], PLT = 1[0– 1] during POD 0; and RBC = 3[0–6], FFP = 6[3–10], PLT = 1[0–2] during POD 0–7. Preoperative factors independently associated with the transfusion of more than two units of RBC were preop Hb (0.6 [0.46–0.79], p < 0.001) and MELD score (1.13 [1.06–1.20], p < 0.001). Discussion: These results suggest that preop Hb and MELD score are associated with blood requirements during LT. [less ▲]

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See detailReply: To PMID 24833726.
JORIS, Jean ULiege; Hans, Grégory ULiege

in British Journal of Anaesthesia (2015), 115(1), 132

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See detailLa Narcolepsie-Cataplexie aujourd'hui
DEPIERREUX, Frédérique ULiege; FANIELLE, Julien ULiege; Lecomte, Marianne ULiege et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69(2), 72-81

Diagnostic criteria and pathophysiology of narcolepsy- <br />cataplexy have evolved considerably over the last 10 years. <br />The main cause, already mentioned in a previous paper, in the <br />Revue ... [more ▼]

Diagnostic criteria and pathophysiology of narcolepsy- <br />cataplexy have evolved considerably over the last 10 years. <br />The main cause, already mentioned in a previous paper, in the <br />Revue Médicale de Liège, in 2002, is based, in human beings, <br />on a destruction of specific cells located in the lateral and <br />posterior part of the hypothalamus (the perifornical nuclei, <br />containing some 70,000 neurons), producing peptides which <br />stimulate the central nervous system; they are called hypocretins <br />or orexins. The role of autoimmunity in their disappearance <br />becomes more evident. The treatment is simplified but <br />remains symptomatic. It is mainly based on Sodium Oxybate <br />or Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate, syrup, prescribed for the night. <br />The authors report on their own experience in this regard and <br />on future therapeutics more targeted towards the cause of the <br />disease. [less ▲]

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See detailMécanismes de l'anesthésie générale: apport de l'imagerie fonctionnelle
Boveroux, Pierre ULiege; Bonhomme, Vincent ULiege; Kirsch, Murielle ULiege et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2009), 64(Synthèse 2009), 36-41

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See detailPlasticity of cultured mesenchymal stem cells: switch from nestin-positive to excitable neuron-like phenotype.
Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine ULiege; Hans, Grégory ULiege; Leprince, Pierre ULiege et al

in Stem Cells (2005), 23(3), 392-402

Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into several types of mesenchymal cells, including osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, but, under appropriate experimental conditions, can ... [more ▼]

Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into several types of mesenchymal cells, including osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, but, under appropriate experimental conditions, can also differentiate into nonmesenchymal cells--for instance, neural cells. These observations have raised interest in the possible use of MSCs in cell therapy strategies for various neurological disorders. In the study reported here, we addressed the question of in vitro differentiation of MSCs into functional neurons. First, we demonstrate that when they are co-cultured with cerebellar granule neurons, adult MSCs can express neuronal markers. Two factors are needed for the emergence of neuronal differentiation of the MSCs: the first one is nestin expression by MSCs (nestin is a marker for the responsive character of MSCs to extrinsic signals), and the second one is a direct cell-cell interaction between neural cells and MSCs that allows the integration of these extrinsic signals. Three different approaches suggest that neural phenotypes arise from MSCs by a differentiation rather than a cell fusion process, although this last phenomenon can also coexist. The expression of several genes--including sox, pax, notch, delta, frizzled, and erbB--was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in order to further characterize the nestin-positive phenotype compared to the nestin-negative one. An overexpression of sox2, sox10, pax6, fzd, erbB2, and erbB4 is found in nestin-positive MSCs. Finally, electrophysiological analyses demonstrate that MSC-derived neuron-like cells can fire single-action potentials and respond to several neurotransmitters such as GABA, glycine, and glutamate. We conclude that nestin-positive MSCs can differentiate in vitro into excitable neuron-like cells. [less ▲]

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See detailNestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells favour the astroglial lineage in neural progenitors and stem cells by releasing active BMP4.
Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine ULiege; Bruyere, Françoise ULiege; Hans, Grégory ULiege et al

in BMC Neuroscience (2004), 5

BACKGROUND: Spontaneous repair is limited after CNS injury or degeneration because neurogenesis and axonal regrowth rarely occur in the adult brain. As a result, cell transplantation has raised much ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Spontaneous repair is limited after CNS injury or degeneration because neurogenesis and axonal regrowth rarely occur in the adult brain. As a result, cell transplantation has raised much interest as potential treatment for patients with CNS lesions. Several types of cells have been considered as candidates for such cell transplantation and replacement therapies. Foetal brain tissue has already been shown to have significant effects in patients with Parkinson's disease. Clinical use of the foetal brain tissue is, however, limited by ethical and technical problems as it requires high numbers of grafted foetal cells and immunosuppression. Alternatively, several reports suggested that mesenchymal stem cells, isolated from adult bone marrow, are multipotent cells and could be used in autograft approach for replacement therapies. RESULTS: In this study, we addressed the question of the possible influence of mesenchymal stem cells on neural stem cell fate. We have previously reported that adult rat mesenchymal stem cells are able to express nestin in defined culture conditions (in the absence of serum and after 25 cell population doublings) and we report here that nestin-positive (but not nestin-negative) mesenchymal stem cells are able to favour the astroglial lineage in neural progenitors and stem cells cultivated from embryonic striatum. The increase of the number of GFAP-positive cells is associated with a significant decrease of the number of Tuj1- and O4-positive cells. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrate that mesenchymal stem cells express LIF, CNTF, BMP2 and BMP4 mRNAs, four cytokines known to play a role in astroglial fate decision. In this model, BMP4 is responsible for the astroglial stimulation and oligodendroglial inhibition, as 1) this cytokine is present in a biologically-active form only in nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium and 2) anti-BMP4 antibodies inhibit the nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium inducing effect on astrogliogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: When thinking carefully about mesenchymal stem cells as candidates for cellular therapy in neurological diseases, their effects on resident neural cell fate have to be considered. [less ▲]

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