Publications of Corinne CHARLIER
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See detailAssessment of children’s exposure to currently used pesticides in wallonia, Belgium
PIRARD, Catherine ULiege; Remy, Suzanne; Giusti, Arnaud et al

in Toxicology Letters (2020), 329

In spring 2016, a study was carried out to characterize currently used pesticide (CUP) exposure among children living in Wallonia (Belgium). Pesticides were measured in both first morning urine voids of ... [more ▼]

In spring 2016, a study was carried out to characterize currently used pesticide (CUP) exposure among children living in Wallonia (Belgium). Pesticides were measured in both first morning urine voids of 258 children aged from 9 to 12 years and in ambient air collected close to the children’s schools. Out of the 46 pesticides measured in the air, 19 were detected with frequencies varying between 11 % and 100 %, and mean levels ranging from < 0.04 to 2.37 ng/m³. Only 3 parent pesticides were found in 1–10% of the urine samples, while all the metabolites analyzed were positively detected at least once. The captan metabolite (THPI) was quantified in 23.5 % of the samples, while 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (chlopryrifos metabolite) was detected in all urines with levels ranging from 0.36–38.96 μg/l. 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), trans-3-(2,2 dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (t-DCCA) and diethylphosphate were the most abundant pyrethroid metabolites and dialkylphosphate measured. The air inhalation was demonstrated to be a minor route of exposure for the selected CUPs. Statistical regressions highlighted predictors of exposure for some pesticides such like consumption of grey bread, presence of carpets at home or indoor use of pesticides, although no clear source was identified for most of them [less ▲]

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See detailBlood Lead, Urinary Lead and Urinary δ-Aminolevulinic Acid Levels among Children Living in Kinshasa, D R Congo: A Pilot Biomonitoring Study,
Mputu, MLC; Ndelo, MP; Marini Djang'Eing'A, Roland ULiege et al

in Journal of toxicology and Risk Assessment (2019), 5(2),

Lead exists naturally in the earth's crust and it is widely used as a heavy metal. It is an environment toxicant that may deleteriously affect nervous, hematopoietic, skeletal, renal, endocrine and ... [more ▼]

Lead exists naturally in the earth's crust and it is widely used as a heavy metal. It is an environment toxicant that may deleteriously affect nervous, hematopoietic, skeletal, renal, endocrine and reproductive systems. So, exposure to lead in the environment continues to be a serious public health problem for all ages. Children are particularly susceptible to lead poisoning. They absorb more lead from their environment and their developing central nervous systems are vulnerable to the toxic. Fifty percent of children aged from 0 to 17-years-old presented blood lead levels above 100 μg/L and forty three percent of the same population presented blood lead levels above 50 μg/L. There was no correlation between urinary lead level and D-ALAU (urinary δ-aminolevulinic acid) with lead blood levels. But it was observed a small correlation between urinary lead and blood lead concentrations. [less ▲]

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See detailHUMAN BIOMONITORING FOR GARDENERS EXPOSED TO CONTAMINATED SOILS IN LIÈGE
Maggi, Patrick ULiege; Petit, Jérôme; PIRARD, Catherine ULiege et al

Conference (2019, August 28)

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See detailAssociation between mixture of persistent organic pollutants and thyroid pathologies in a Belgian population.
Dufour, Patrice ULiege; PIRARD, Catherine ULiege; Petrossians, Patrick ULiege et al

in Environmental Research (2019)

Previous years, the incidence of autoimmune thyroid diseases has increased worldwide. The presence of many pollutants in the environment suspected to be thyroid disruptors may have contributed to the ... [more ▼]

Previous years, the incidence of autoimmune thyroid diseases has increased worldwide. The presence of many pollutants in the environment suspected to be thyroid disruptors may have contributed to the observed increase. Unfortunately, the results from epidemiological studies assessing the association between pollution and thyroid disorders remain inconsistent, maybe due to a nearly complete neglect of the mixture effect. The blood levels of 12 brominated flame retardants, 3 polychlorinated biphenyls, 16 organochlorine pesticides, 7 perfluoroalkyl substances and 16 phenolic organohalogens were measured in 35 hypothyroid and 44 hyperthyroid volunteers and in 160 individuals from the general population designed as controls. Weighted quantile sum (WQS) regressions were performed to compute indexes representing the mixture of POPs, and we assessed the relations with thyroid disorders. Nineteen pollutants were detected in more than 40% of the individuals and were thus included in the WQS indexes. The WQS index was statistically significantly associated with an increased odds of hypothyroidism (odds ratio (OR) = 98.1; 95% CI: 5.51-1747) with the highest weights attributed to PCB 138 (w = 0.210), 3-OH-CB 180 (w = 0.197), 4-OH-CB 146 (w = 0.188), 4',4-DDE (w = 0.156) while there were no evidence of a relation with increased odds of hyperthyroidism. Given the relative low number of individuals included in the present investigation, standard WQS methodology could not be used, this study should thus be considered as a preliminary, hypothesis-generating study. Nevertheless, these results highlighted the importance of considering the potential effect of chemical mixture when studying endocrine disruptors. [less ▲]

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See detailDeath following consumption of MDAI and EAPB
DEVILLE, Marine ULiege; DUBOIS, Nathalie ULiege; Cieckiewicz, Ewa ULiege et al

Conference (2018, August 28)

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See detailSelection and ranking method for currently used pesticides (CUPs) monitoring in ambient air
Giusti, Arnaud; PIRARD, Catherine ULiege; CHARLIER, Corinne ULiege et al

in Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health (2018), 11

Chronic exposure to pesticides can induce adverse human health effects. Even though ingestion is considered as the main exposure pathway, it is now suggested that inhalation might also be important not ... [more ▼]

Chronic exposure to pesticides can induce adverse human health effects. Even though ingestion is considered as the main exposure pathway, it is now suggested that inhalation might also be important not only in rural but also in urban locations. Therefore, assessment of currently used pesticides (CUPs) concentrations in ambient air is important for better understanding of human exposure through inhalation and potential health effects. Analytical methods do not allow assessing ambient air concentration of all the CUPs registered. Designing a cost-effective and a fitted-for-purpose monitoring strategy at the local/regional scale must therefore rely on a methodology allowing targeting CUPs by a ranking approach accounting for the most relevant selection criteria. In this study, after a first selection, a ranking method is used to identify most relevant CUPs for ambient air assessment in Wallonia, Belgium. This method took into account not only toxicological endpoints but also national and regional data on sales and uses along with other uses criteria. Moreover, probability to detect CUPs in ambient air was investigated using international, national, and regional studies and physicochemphysicochemical properties. The ranking method used three main criteria (i.e., chronic toxicity, sales and uses, and presence in ambient air), which are divided in 17 sub-criteria, to provide the most accurate identification of CUPs that might be measured in ambient air and that might impact human health. After final selection based on analytical methods, 43 CUPs were further submitted to analytical method development. [less ▲]

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See detailQualité de l'air intérieur en Belgique
Bladt, Sandrine; Bouland, Catherine; Casimir, Georges et al

Report (2017)

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See detailThe transfer of a high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection method for the determination in serum of psychotropic drugs
Hahirwa, Innocent; Charlier, Corinne ULiege; Karangwa, Charles et al

in Rwanda Journal (2017), 4(1), 7-16

The relevance of the determination of blood concentration levels of psychotropic drugs has been demonstrated in Rwanda. However, due to the lack of appropriate analytical methods, such activity is not ... [more ▼]

The relevance of the determination of blood concentration levels of psychotropic drugs has been demonstrated in Rwanda. However, due to the lack of appropriate analytical methods, such activity is not carried out in this country. Objective: The aim of this work was to transfer to a Rwandan laboratory a High Performance Liquid Chromatography based method, applicable for the determination in serum of psychotropic drugs commonly prescribed in Rwanda. Method: Liquid-liquid extraction using prazepam as internal standard was used for sample preparation. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Symmetry C8 analytical column, using acetonitrile and a phosphate buffer as mobile phase. The method was validated with respect to total error concept as decision criterion. Results: The validated method was linear over tested dosing intervals with a coefficient of determination greater than 0.99 for all analytes. The precision was good with RSD between 1.3 and 15.6 % and the trueness ranged between 87 and 109 %. The accuracy of the method was demonstrated as well. Conclusion: The analytical method allowing a simultaneous determination in serum of several antipsychotropic drugs was successfully validated and thus transferred to the Laboratory of Analysis of Foodstuffs, Drugs, Water and Toxics (Rwanda). [less ▲]

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See detailStrychnine poisoning still happens in 2015
DEVILLE, Marine ULiege; Lemaire, Eric ULiege; DENOOZ, Raphael ULiege et al

Conference (2016, August 29)

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See detailLoss of treatment benefit when heroin-assisted treatment is stopped after 12 month
Demaret, Isabelle ULiege; Quertemont, Etienne ULiege; Litran, Géraldine et al

in Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment (2016), 69

Purpose: In 2013, during a recent heroin-assisted treatment trial, participants in heroinassisted treatment (HAT) decreased significantly more their street heroin use than participants in oral methadone ... [more ▼]

Purpose: In 2013, during a recent heroin-assisted treatment trial, participants in heroinassisted treatment (HAT) decreased significantly more their street heroin use than participants in oral methadone treatment. After the trial, HAT was discontinued. To examine whether the treatment benefits were sustained three months after the trial, the use of street heroin by the participants was analysed in a follow-up study. Results: At the follow-up assessment, street heroin use increased in the experimental group. The two groups no longer showed a significant difference (p=0.55) in the level of street heroin use. Conclusion: A predetermined and forced end of HAT was followed by a significant increase in the level of street level use. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy of heroin-assisted treatment in Belgium: a randomised controlled trial
Demaret, Isabelle ULiege; Quertemont, Etienne ULiege; Litran, Géraldine et al

in European Addiction Research (2015), 21(4), 179-187

Background/Aims: Heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) can improve the condition of heroin addicts still using street heroin after a methadone treatment. In Belgium, a new trial compared the efficacy of a HAT ... [more ▼]

Background/Aims: Heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) can improve the condition of heroin addicts still using street heroin after a methadone treatment. In Belgium, a new trial compared the efficacy of a HAT to existing methadone maintenance treatment. Methods: In this randomised controlled trial, HAT was limited to 12 months. Participants were assessed every 3 months. They were responders if they showed improvement on the level of street heroin use, health or criminal involvement. Results: 74 participants were randomised in the trial. The experimental group (n=36) counted 30% of responders more than the control group (n=38) at each assessment point (p<0.05), except at 12 months where the difference (11%) was no longer significant (p=0.35). Still, after 12 months, participants in the experimental group reported significantly greater improvements (p<0.05) than the control group on the level of street heroin use and on the level of physical and mental health. Both groups reported significantly less criminal facts after 12 months (p<0.001), but with no significant difference between the groups. Conclusions: This trial confirms the short-term efficacy of HAT for severe heroin addicts, who already failed methadone treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailWomen's skin throughout lifetime.
PIERARD, Gérald ULiege; CHARLIER, Corinne ULiege; Delvenne, Philippe ULiege et al

in BioMed Research International (2014), 2014

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See detailProjet TADAM: RAPPORT FINAL 2007-2013
Demaret, Isabelle ULiege; Litran, Géraldine; Magoga, Cécile et al

Report (2013)

Background: Heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) can improve the condition of heroin addicts resistant to other treatment. A new trial compared HAT and methadone treatment with HAT limited to 12 months in ... [more ▼]

Background: Heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) can improve the condition of heroin addicts resistant to other treatment. A new trial compared HAT and methadone treatment with HAT limited to 12 months in order to assess its feasibility and efficacy in Belgium. Methods: TADAM (Treatment Assisted by Diacetylmorphine) was an open label randomised controlled trial. The experimental treatment was based upon the Swiss model of HAT developed in 1994. The primary efficacy criterion was determined by an improvement in street heroin use or in (physical or mental) health or a decrease in criminal involvement. Participants were assessed every 3 months. Self-reported data were complemented with toxicological analyses and criminal proceedings. Findings: 74 participants were randomised in the trial: 36 in the experimental group and 38 in the control group. The experimental group counted 30% of responders more than the control group at 3 months (p<0.05), 6 months (p<0.05), and 9 months (p<0.01). At 12 months, the number of responders was still higher in the experimental group (11%) but the difference was no longer significant (p=0.35). Street heroin use increased in the experimental group at the 12-month assessment just before the end of HAT. Conclusion: HAT is feasible and effective. However, HAT should not have a predetermined duration for heroin users for which heroin addiction became a chronic relapsing disease. Other data: In addition to the outcomes of the randomised controlled trial, the report contains other exploratory data and analysis: satisfaction of in treatment, criminological data, opinion of heroin users not included in the trial, opinion of caregivers and field workers (in the HAT centre, in the partner centres, and in other centres in the addiction field), impact of the HAT centre on its neighbourhood and a socio-economic evaluation. Funding: The TADAM trial was funded at 80% by the Federal Minister of Social Affairs and Public Health. It was also funded the City and the University of Liège. [less ▲]

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