Publications of Marc JANSSENS
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See detailActualites therapeutiques en anesthesie-reanimation: cap sur l'hopital de jour
Hick, Gaëtane ULiege; Kirsch, Murielle ULiege; Janssens, Marc ULiege et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2007), 62(5-6, May-Jun), 272-6

The one day clinic possesses its own structure and organisation; patient management is also specific. Preoperative visit and assessment are programmed at least 48 hours before anesthesia. Preoperative ... [more ▼]

The one day clinic possesses its own structure and organisation; patient management is also specific. Preoperative visit and assessment are programmed at least 48 hours before anesthesia. Preoperative examinations and choice of anesthetic technique (sedation associated with local anesthesia or not, general anesthesia, locoregional anesthesia, or hypnosedation) are discussed and determined depending upon medical history, clinical examination, and type of procedure. General recommandations, instructions about fasting, interruption of some therapies, and introduction of new medication(s) are explained orally and also provided in a written document. New anesthetics and analgesics allow quick awakening and recovery of vital functions, and subsequently rapid hospital discharge. Prevention and aggressive treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting are also a major concern in our anesthesic management of ambulatory patient. [less ▲]

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See detailA comparison of the training value of two types of anesthesia simulators: Computer screen-based and mannequin-based simulators
Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULiege; Larbuisson, Robert ULiege; Janssens, Marc ULiege et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (2002), 94(6), 1560-1565

In this study, we compared two different training simulators (the computer screen-based simulator versus the full-scale simulator) with respect to training effectiveness in anesthesia residents ... [more ▼]

In this study, we compared two different training simulators (the computer screen-based simulator versus the full-scale simulator) with respect to training effectiveness in anesthesia residents. Participants were evaluated in the management of a simulated preprogrammed scenario of anaphylactic shock using two variables: treatment score and diagnosis time. Our results showed that simulators can contribute significantly to the improvement of performance but that learning in treating simulated crisis situations such as anaphylactic shock did not significantly vary between full-scale and computer screen-based simulators. Consequently, the initial decision on whether to use a full-scale or computer screen-based training simulator should be made on the basis of cost and learning objectives rather than on the basis of technical or fidelity criteria. Our results support the contention that screen-based simulators are good devices to acquire technical skills of crisis management. Mannequin-based simulators would probably provide better training for behavioral aspects of crisis management, such as communication, leadership, and interpersonal conflicts, but this was not tested in the current study. IMPLICATIONS: We compared two different training simulators (computer screen-based versus full-scale) for training anesthesia residents to better document the effectiveness of such devices as training tools. This is an important issue, given the extensive use and the high cost of mannequin-based simulators in anesthesiology. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of Anaesthesia Simulator: Initial Impressions of Its Use in Two Belgian University Centers
Larbuisson, Robert ULiege; Pendeville, P.; Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULiege et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (1999), 50(2), 87-93

459 trainees in Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, accompanied by fully certified specialists from several Belgian University Hospital Centers, spend at least a 3 hour session at the Anaesthesia ... [more ▼]

459 trainees in Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, accompanied by fully certified specialists from several Belgian University Hospital Centers, spend at least a 3 hour session at the Anaesthesia Simulator. Each session comprises three segments: the briefing, the simulation session and the debriefing. The use of simulations allows significant individualization of the learning experience. The simulator helps to develop the capacity to understand, explain a phenomenon and to resolve problems. Another important aspect of the use of the simulator involves the trainee's "right to make mistakes". This allows to widen the spectrum of executional situations, and decreases the number of dangerous situations. Two University Centers (ULg and UCL) have each organized simulator sessions despite some differences in their approaches. The simulator is a teaching tool worthy of an obligatory role in the most up-to-date training possible of modern anesthesiologist. This is all the more important given that the current practice of anesthesiology is so complex that any error could cost a human life. [less ▲]

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