Publications of Rafael FERNANDEZ CARAZO
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See detailHigh-resolution melting of multiple barcode amplicons for plant species authentication.
Ballin, Nicolai Zederkopff; Onaindia, Jone Omar; Jawad, Hadeel et al

in Food Control (2019), 105

In recent years, species identification in herbs has attracted considerable attention due to several cases of fraud; hence inexpensive high-throughput authentication methods are highly welcomed. Species ... [more ▼]

In recent years, species identification in herbs has attracted considerable attention due to several cases of fraud; hence inexpensive high-throughput authentication methods are highly welcomed. Species authentication is often performed through DNA analysis and several specific regions (barcodes) are considered suitable. Each barcode (Bar) possesses different qualities in terms of universality and discrimination power. A multiplexed format where information can be extracted simultaneously from several barcode regions is seemingly appropriate to ensure the power of both universality and discrimination. In this approach, we amplified DNA from five different barcode regions in a multiplexed PCR format followed by high-resolution melting (HRM). This multiplexed Bar-HRM approach was first applied to plants spanning the plant kingdom and then gradually narrowing down the genetic variability within the Lamiaceae and the Solanaceae families to finally reach closely related cultivars. Universality was demonstrated through distinct melting profiles obtained for species originating from 29 different families spanning the angiosperms, gymnosperm, mosses, and liverwort (Marchantiophyta). Discrimination power was retained for species, sub-species, and a few cultivars through the application of multivariate statistics to the high-resolution melting profiles. This preliminary investigation has shown the potential to discriminate a vast amount of species within the whole plant kingdom. It requires no a priori knowledge of the species' DNA sequence and occurs in a closed system within 2.5h at a reduced cost per sample compared to other DNA based approaches. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Sor Rondane Mountains (Dronning Maud Land) as a Possible Refuge for Antarctic Cyanobacterial Communities
FERNANDEZ CARAZO, Rafael ULiege

in Origins of Life and Evolution of Biospheres (2010), (40(6):544-544),

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See detailThe limnology and biology of the Dufek Massif, Transantarctic Mountains 82° South
Hodgson, Dominic A; Convey, Pete; Verleyen, Elie et al

in Polar Science (2010), 4

Very little is known about the higher latitude inland biology of continental Antarctica. In this paper we describe the limnology and biology of the Dufek Massif, using a range of observational ... [more ▼]

Very little is known about the higher latitude inland biology of continental Antarctica. In this paper we describe the limnology and biology of the Dufek Massif, using a range of observational, microscopic and molecular methods. Here two dry valleys are home to some of the southernmost biota on Earth. Cyanobacteria were the dominant life forms, being found in lakes and ponds, in hypersaline brines, summer melt water, relict pond beds and in exposed terrestrial habitats. Their species diversity was the lowest yet observed in Antarctic lakes. Green algae, cercozoa and bacteria were present, but diatoms were absent except for a single valve; likely windblown. Mosses were absent and only one lichen specimen was found. The Metazoa included three microbivorous tardigrades (Acutuncus antarcticus, Diphascon sanae and Echiniscus (cf) pseudowendti) and bdelloid rotifer species, but no arthropods or nematodes. These simple faunal and floral communities are missing most of the elements normally present at lower latitudes in the Antarctic which is probably a result of the very harsh environmental conditions in the area. [less ▲]

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See detailFossil cyanobacterial DNA from sediment cores at Beak Island (Antarctic Peninsula): challenges for a molecular approach
Fernandez Carazo, Rafael ULiege; Wilmotte, Annick ULiege

in Decleir, Hugo; De Broyer, Claude; Dehairs, Frank (Eds.) et al CONTACTFORUM Belgian IPY symposium. The contribution of Belgian Research to the achievements of the International Polar Year 2007-2009 (2010)

Two sediment cores taken from lakes BK1 and BK2 in Beak Island (Trinity Peninsula, Antarctic Peninsula) were analysed. The cores were divided in two sections (lacustrine and marine). Changes in ... [more ▼]

Two sediment cores taken from lakes BK1 and BK2 in Beak Island (Trinity Peninsula, Antarctic Peninsula) were analysed. The cores were divided in two sections (lacustrine and marine). Changes in cyanobacterial diversity occurring within the lacustrine section, when the lake was isolated from the sea, were studied. [less ▲]

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See detailBiogeography of terrestrial cyanobacteria from Antarctic ice-free areas
Namsaraev, Zorigto ULiege; Mano, Marie-José ULiege; Fernandez Carazo, Rafael ULiege et al

in Annals of Glaciology (2010), 51(56), 171-177

Cyanobacteria inhabit the Antarctic continent and have even been observed in the most southerly ice-free areas of Antarctica (86–878 S). The highest molecular diversity of cyanobacterial communities was ... [more ▼]

Cyanobacteria inhabit the Antarctic continent and have even been observed in the most southerly ice-free areas of Antarctica (86–878 S). The highest molecular diversity of cyanobacterial communities was found in the areas located between 708 S and 808 S. Further south and further north from this zone, the diversity abruptly decreased. Seventy-nine per cent (33 of 42 operational taxonomic units) of Antarctic terrestrial cyanobacteria have a cosmopolitan distribution. Analysis of the sampling efforts shows that only three regions (southern Victoria Land, the Sør Rondane Mountains and Alexander Island) have been particularly well studied, while other areas did not receive enough attention. Although cyanobacteria possess a capacity for long-range transport, regional populations in Antarctic ice-free areas seem to exist. The cyanobacterial communities of the three most intensively studied regions, separated from each other by a distance of 3000–3400 km, had a low degree of similarity with each other. Further development of microbial biogeography demands a standardized approach. For this purpose, as a minimal standard, we suggest using the sequence of cyanobacterial 16S rRNA gene between Escherichia coli positions 405–780. [less ▲]

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See detailBaseline data on cyanobacterial diversity near the new Princess Elizabeth Antarctic research station.
Fernandez Carazo, Rafael ULiege; Namsaraev, Zorigto; Ertz, Damien et al

Poster (2009, July 27)

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See detailExploring the Holocene through fossil cyanobacterial sequences from Antarctic lake sediments.
Fernandez Carazo, Rafael ULiege; Waleron, Krzysztof; Hodgson, Dominic et al

Poster (2009, July 27)

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See detailCyanobacterial diversity in the Transantarctic Mountains (Antarctica).
Fernandez Carazo, Rafael ULiege; Hodgson, Dominic; Wilmotte, Annick ULiege

Poster (2008, August 31)

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See detailFossil cyanobacterial sequences in Antarctic lake sediments
Fernandez Carazo, Rafael ULiege; Hodgson, Dominique; Wilmotte, Annick ULiege

Poster (2008, August 31)

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