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See detail@u monde, citoyen !
Jadoulle, Jean-Louis ULiege

Book published by Didier Hatier (2012)

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See detail@u monde, citoyen !
Jadoulle, Jean-Louis ULiege

Book published by Didier Hatier (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 127 (8 ULiège)
See detail@u monde, citoyen !
Jadoulle, Jean-Louis ULiege

Book published by Didier Hatier (2011)

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See detailU-100 insulin gives some protection against metabolic deterioration due to CSII interruption.
Scheen, André ULiege; Henrivaux, P.; Jandrain, Bernard ULiege et al

in Diabetes Care (1987), 10(6), 707-11

We investigated the influence of insulin concentration within the insulin pump on the metabolic and plasma free-insulin changes induced by a 6-h nocturnal interruption of continuous subcutaneous insulin ... [more ▼]

We investigated the influence of insulin concentration within the insulin pump on the metabolic and plasma free-insulin changes induced by a 6-h nocturnal interruption of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in five C-peptide-negative insulin-dependent diabetic patients with low circulating levels of anti-insulin antibodies. We compared the changes in blood glucose, plasma free fatty acids, 3-hydroxybutyrate, and free insulin during the interruption from 2300 to 0500 h of the Nordisk Infuser loaded with either U-100 or U-20 regular insulin. The decrease in plasma free-insulin levels was slower, resulting in a significantly delayed and smaller increase in blood glucose levels (2.4 +/- 1.6 vs. 7.6 +/- 2.9 mM, P less than .025) when the pump contained U-100 instead of U-20 insulin. Although the increases in levels of plasma free fatty acids were similar in both tests, the rise in plasma 3-hydroxybutyrate levels tended to be reduced with U-100 insulin (414 +/- 139 vs. 639 +/- 67 microM, P less than .10). Thus, our observations indicate that U-100 insulin gives some protection against the metabolic deterioration due to the interruption of CSII so that diabetic patients may be able to remain without the pump for longer periods with concentrated rather than diluted insulin. [less ▲]

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See detailU-Frequent hypercyclicity notions and related weighted densities
Ernst, Romuald; Esser, Céline ULiege; Menet, Quentin

in Israel Journal of Mathematics (2021), 241

We study dynamical notions lying between U-frequent hypercyclicity and reiterative hypercyclicity by investigating weighted upper densities between the unweighted upper density and the upper Banach ... [more ▼]

We study dynamical notions lying between U-frequent hypercyclicity and reiterative hypercyclicity by investigating weighted upper densities between the unweighted upper density and the upper Banach density. While chaos implies reiterative hypercyclicity, we show that chaos does not imply U-frequent hypercyclicity with respect to a weighted upper density. Moreover, we show that if T is U-frequently hypercyclic (resp. reiteratively hypercyclic) then the n-fold product of T is still U-frequently hypercyclic (resp. reiteratively hypercyclic) and that this implication is also satisfied for each of the considered U-frequent hypercyclicity notions. [less ▲]

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See detailU-Pb monazite dating of the Turee Creek Group sedimentary succession: implications on the rise of oxygen and glacial events
Caquineau, Tom; Paquette, Jean Louis; François, Camille ULiege et al

in Goldschmidt Conference Abstract, Prague, CZ, 2015 (2015)

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See detailU-Pb zircon calendar for Namaquan (Grenville) crustal events in the granulite-facies terrane of the O'okiep Copper District of South Africa
Clifford, Tom N.; Barton, Erika S; Stern, Richard A. et al

in Journal of Petrology (2004), 45(4), 669-691

The O'okiep Copper District is underlain by voluminous 1035-1210 Ma granite gneiss and granite with remnants of metamorphosed supracrustal rocks. This assemblage was intruded by the 1030 Ma copper-bearing ... [more ▼]

The O'okiep Copper District is underlain by voluminous 1035-1210 Ma granite gneiss and granite with remnants of metamorphosed supracrustal rocks. This assemblage was intruded by the 1030 Ma copper-bearing Koperberg Suite that includes jotunite, anorthosite, biotite diorite and hypersthene-bearing rocks ranging from leuconorite to hypersthenite. New sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe age data demonstrate the presence of 1700-2000 Ma zircon as xenocrysts in all of the intrusive rocks, and as detrital zircon in the metasediments of the Khurisberg Subgroup. These data are consistent with published Sm-Nd model ages of c. 1700 Ma (T-CHUR) and c. 2000 Ma (T-DM) of many of the intrusives that support a major crust-forming event in Eburnian (Hudsonian) times. In addition, U-Th-Pb analyses of zircons from all major rock units define two tectono-magmatic episodes of the Namaquan Orogeny: (1) the O'okiepian Episode (1180-1210 Ma), represented by regional granite plutonism, notably the Nababeep and Modderfontein Granite Gneisses and the Concordia and Kweekfontein Granites that accompanied and outlasted (e.g. Kweekfontein Granite) regional tectonism [F-2(D-2)] and granulite-facies metamorphism (M-2); (2) the Klondikean Episode (1020-1040 Ma), which includes the intrusion of the porphyritic Rietberg Granite and of the Koperberg Suite that are devoid of regional planar or linear fabrics. Klondikean tectonism (D-3) is reflected by major east-west-trending open folds [F-3(D-3a)], and by localized east-west-trending near-vertical ductile folds ['steep structures'; F-4(D-3b)] whose formation was broadly coeval with the intrusion of the Koperberg Suite. A regional, largely thermal, amphibolite- to granulite-facies metamorphism (M-3) accompanied D-3. This study demonstrates, inter alia, that the complete spectrum of rock-types of the Koperberg Suite, together with the Rietberg Granite, was intruded in a short time-interval (<10 Myr) at c. 1030 Ma, and that there were lengthy periods of about 150 Myr of tectonic quiescence within the Namaquan Orogeny: (1) between the O'okiepian and Klondikean Episodes; (2) from the end of the latter to the formal end of Namaquan Orogenesis 800-850 Ma ago. [less ▲]

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See detailU-Shaped Switches for Optical Information Processing at the Nanoscale
Valev, Ventsislav K; Silhanek, Alejandro ULiege; De Clercq, Ben et al

in Small: Nano Micro (2011), 7(18), 2573-2576

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See detailU.S.A. Patriot Act : nouvelle arme contre le blanchiment
Kohl, Benoît ULiege; Matray, Didier ULiege

Article for general public (2003)

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See detailUaktualnione stanowisko ESC dotyczace stosowania podwojnej terapii przeciwplytkowej w chorobie wiencowej w 2017 roku, przygotowane we wspolpracy z EACTS
Valgimigli, Marco; Bueno, Hector; Byrne, Robert A. et al

in Kardiologia Polska (2017), 75(12), 1217-1299

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See detailUAS imagery reveals new survey opportunities for counting hippos
Linchant, Julie ULiege; Lhoest, Simon ULiege; Quevauvillers, Samuel ULiege et al

in PLoS ONE (2018), 13(11), 0206413

Introduction The common hippopotamus Hippopotamus amphibius L. is a vulnerable species that requires efficient methods to monitor its populations for conservation purposes. Rapid evolution of civil drones ... [more ▼]

Introduction The common hippopotamus Hippopotamus amphibius L. is a vulnerable species that requires efficient methods to monitor its populations for conservation purposes. Rapid evolution of civil drones provides new opportunities but survey protocols still need development. This study aims to determine the optimal flight parameters for accurate population estimates. A second objective is to evaluate the effects of three environmental factors: wind speed, sun reflection and cloud cover. Method We estimated the population of two main hippo schools (Dungu and Wilibadi II) located in Garamba National Park in Democratic republic of Congo. Eight observers reviewed 252 photos taken over the Dungu school, representing a total of 2016 experimental units. A detection rate and a level of certainty were associated with each experimental unit, and five parameters were related to each count: flight height, three environmental parameters (sun reflection on water surface, cloud cover, and wind speed), and observers’ experience. Results Flight height reduced the observers’ confidence in their detection ability, rather than the detection itself. For accurate counts of large groups an average height of 150 m was shown to be a good compromise between animal detection without zooming in and the area covered in one frame. Wind speed had little influence on the counts, but it affected the performance of the UAS. Sun reflection reduced the detection rate of hippos and increased level of certainty, while cloud cover reduced detection rates slightly. Therefore, we recommend flying when the sun is still low on the horizon and when there is little cloud, or when cloud cover is light and even. This last point reinforces our recommendation for flights early in the day. The counts also showed large differences between groups of inexperienced and experienced observers. Experienced observers achieved better detection rates and were generally more confident in their detection. Experienced observers detected 86.5% of the hippos on average (confidence interval = ±0.76%). When applied to data from the second site, the detection was 84.3% (confidence interval = ±1.84%). Two correction factors were then calculated, as the inverse of the detection rate, based on the estimated number of hippos present during one flight (Factor 1) or in the general population respectively (Factor 2). Factor 2 especially was consistent with previous studies using traditional aerial counts (1.22 vs 1.25). Factor 2 was found to be appropriate for use by experienced observers. These results confirm the use of correction factor 2 for hippo surveys, regardless of the study site, as it accounts for hippo behavior. Optimum counting and cost efficiency were achieved with two trained observers counting 7 pictures. Conclusion This study is a promising approach for routine surveys of the hippopotamus which is a species usually ignored in wildlife counts. Drone technology is expected to improve rapidly; therefore UAS could become a very useful and affordable survey tool for other species requiring specific monitoring. [less ▲]

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See detailUAV-based remote sensing for high spatio-temporal monitoring of century-old biochar effects on crop performance
Heidarian Dehkordi, Ramin ULiege

Doctoral thesis (2021)

Biochar, the solid carbon-rich residue of biomass pyrolysis, has been widely promoted in the context of climate-smart agriculture to improve soil nutrient availability, soil acidity, and water holding ... [more ▼]

Biochar, the solid carbon-rich residue of biomass pyrolysis, has been widely promoted in the context of climate-smart agriculture to improve soil nutrient availability, soil acidity, and water holding capacity. The aforementioned biochar impacts on soil quality can, in turn, affect nutrient uptake and crop productivity. Although numerous studies have explored short-term biochar effects on soil-plant system, there exists a general lack of researches investigating the long-term effects. As such, this project (CHAR-ARC) aims to evaluate the effects of century-old biochar (aged in agricultural soils more than 150 years ago) on soil-plant interactions within three different work packages. The first and second work packages study century-old biochar effects on nutrient cycling and water dynamics, respectively. The third work package (this thesis) investigates century-old biochar effects on crop dynamics using remote sensing images allowing for a high spatio-temporal monitoring thorough the entire cropping seasons. The study site is an agricultural field near Isnes (NW corner: 50°31′N 4°44′E; SE corner: 50°31′N 4°45′E) in central Belgium. The field was predominantly covered with oak, hornbeam, beech, and hazel forests and had been turned into cropland since the eighteenth century resulting in eleven biochar patches within the site. The soil type is Luvisol with a silt loam texture in the topsoil. Soil organic carbon and total nitrogen concentrations were determined following a regular sampling scheme by dry combustion using the Leco TruMac element analyser. High-resolution remotely-sensed images captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) were deployed (a total of 27 UAV flights) to monitor crop performance across the century-old biochar patches in comparison to their adjacent reference soil patches. Red-Green-Blue (RGB) dataset was acquired using a DJI Phantom 4 Pro. Multispectral and thermal datasets were collected RedEdge-M and FLIR Vue Pro Radiometric sensors respectively, on boar of a DJI Matrice 100. In Chapter 2, high-resolution UAV images were deployed to monitor chicory crop growth across the century-old biochar patches in comparison to their adjacent reference soil patches over the 2018 cropping season. Chicory canopy cover was retrieved from the RGB sensor as the ratio of the pixels covered by vegetation to the total number of ground pixels over the 2018 cropping season. Statistical paired t-test indicated a significant positive impact of century-old biochar on chicory crop growth during the green-up phase. This was corroborated with greater chicory leaf lengths across the biochar patches measured in the field. In addition, chicory crop water stress was retrieved as the difference between the canopy temperature (derived from the thermal images) and the air temperature (recorded by the on-site weather station). Moreover, the topographical wetness index (TWI) was computed to mitigate the impact of topography on the calculated crop water stress. Interestingly, TWI exhibited a positive relationship with soil organic carbon. Moreover, our results indicated an increase in chicory crop water stress across century-old biochar patches. Lastly, no impact of biochar was observed on the harvested plant biophysical parameters such as chicory yield, root length, or perimeter. The latter underlined the computed chicory canopy cover curves in which no particular impact of biochar was observed at the end of the growing season. In Chapter 3, winter wheat performance was evaluated using RGB and multispectral images throughout the 2019 cropping season. As such, monitoring winter wheat crop growth and health provided new insights into the alteration in winter wheat crop dynamics at the canopy level associated with century-old biochar presence. Similar to the results of chicory season, a significant positive impact of biochar on the evolution of winter wheat canopy cover was illustrated using the RGB images. Furthermore, winter wheat plant height was computed based on the RGB images by subtracting the digital terrain model from the digital surface model (following the necessary calibration chain). The remotely-sensed winter wheat plant height was slightly higher across the century-old biochar patches. In addition, a total of eight vegetation indices were computed based on the multispectral dataset. Though the contrast between biochar and reference plots was not thoroughly the same for all the vegetation indices, several indices such as optimized soil adjusted vegetation index (OSAVI) highlighted a significantly better winter wheat crop development at the beginning of the growing season. There was however no particular impact of biochar on crop spectral status towards the end of the season. Crop health maps were also computed based on the RGB and multispectral images using principal component analysis and k-means clustering. Both RGB and multispectral crop health maps (comprising a clustering agreement of 74.82%) indicated a better winter wheat crop health across the biochar plots. There was also a significant positive impact of biochar on crop growth stages measured in the field. Finally, the plausible relationship between the multispectral vegetation indices and the harvested crop yield was tested. Simplified canopy chlorophyll content index (s-CCI) and normalized difference red edge index (NDRE) were found to be good linear estimators of harvested crop yield. s-CCI was then used to predict a harvested crop yield map for the entire study field. The predicted crop yield showed no remarkable influence of biochar on winter wheat harvested crop yield. In Chapter 4, the potential of high-resolution UAV images to monitor plant diseases, and the plausible link between century-old biochar and plant diseases (as raised in generated crop health maps in Chapter 3) was specifically investigated. For this, UAV-based RGB images were first acquired across four winter wheat fields in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. At the same time, the percentage of the diseased leaf areas in terms of wheat stripe rust (WSR) and wheat leaf rust (WLR) were visually observed in the field. Then, WSR and WLR severities were determined from the acquired RGB images through additive or subtractive models in visual cryptography. As such, digital numbers (DNs) of green and red spectral bands were used to determine WSR. In addition, the combination of DNs of green, red, and blue spectral bands was used to identify WLR. The results indicated a strong correlation between UAV imagery and in-field observations for the determination of WSR, WLR, and canopy cover for winter wheat crop. The identified indices were then applied across the CHAR study site in Gembloux. The estimated WSR severity was 35.7% on average for the biochar plot in comparison to an average of 42.3% in the reference plots. For WLR severity, there was an average of 22.8% in the biochar plots versus 26.4% in the reference plots. These results were in apparent agreement with the identified crop health percentages in Chapter 3 as a function of century-old biochar enrichment. Furthermore, WSR and WLR showed notable alterations in winter wheat typical reflectance spectra, mostly between the green and red spectral bands, in both RGB and multispectral images available across the study site in Gembloux. This finding may pave the way for future researches developing more robust remote sensing indices to monitor fungal foliar diseases. In Chapter 5, the capability of fusing remotely-sensed UAV and Landsat-8 images allowing for a high spatio-temporal monitoring of century-old biochar effects on evapotranspiration over the cropping season was explored. The fusion of UAV and Landsat-8 images was performed using additive wavelet transform (AWT), generating sharpened Landsat-8 images with the high spatial resolution as the UAV images. AWT sharpened Landsat-8 images were spatially well-correlated with coarse resolution images, and were well-preserved the spatial details. Surface albedo and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) were computed based on reflectance spectra of UAV and Landsat-8 multispectral sensors. We retrieved surface temperature images from FLIR Vue Pro R on board of UAV and Landsat-8 brightness temperature images respectively based on reference ground-based thermal panels and temperature emissivity separation algorithm. The fused images and the meteorological data were used as inputs in the ETLook which is a surface energy balance model based on the Penman-Monteith approach. As such, ETLook model provided high spatio-temporal maps of actual evapotranspiration across the field throughout the 2019 cropping season. The results showed a significant decrease in surface albedo across the biochar plots during the early development stages of winter wheat. Moreover, biochar significantly caused an earlier greening up of wheat plants, and also, stimulated the development of wheat canopies towards the middle of the cropping season. There were however no impacts at the end of the season due to dense wheat canopies covering the aggravated dark colour soil across the biochar patches. Surface temperature was not affected by biochar either at the beginning or towards the end of the season. Neither was there any impact of biochar on actual evapotranspiration over the season. The implemented approach may also develop robust techniques for image fusion of UAV and satellite images to better meet the necessities of the precision agriculture. [less ▲]

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See detailUBE2A deficiency syndrome: Mild to severe intellectual disability accompanied by seizures, absent speech, urogenital, and skin anomalies in male patients.
de Leeuw, Nicole; BULK, Saskia ULiege; Green, Andrew et al

in American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A (2010), 152A(12), 3084-90

We describe three patients with a comparable deletion encompassing SLC25A43, SLC25A5, CXorf56, UBE2A, NKRF, and two non-coding RNA genes, U1 and LOC100303728. Moderate to severe intellectual disability ... [more ▼]

We describe three patients with a comparable deletion encompassing SLC25A43, SLC25A5, CXorf56, UBE2A, NKRF, and two non-coding RNA genes, U1 and LOC100303728. Moderate to severe intellectual disability (ID), psychomotor retardation, severely impaired/absent speech, seizures, and urogenital anomalies were present in all three patients. Facial dysmorphisms include ocular hypertelorism, synophrys, and a depressed nasal bridge. These clinical features overlap with those described in two patients from a family with a similar deletion at Xq24 that also includes UBE2A, and in several patients of Brazilian and Polish families with point mutations in UBE2A. Notably, all five patients with an Xq24 deletion have ventricular septal defects that are not present in patients with a point mutation, which might be attributed to the deletion of SLC25A5. Taken together, the UBE2A deficiency syndrome in male patients with a mutation in or a deletion of UBE2A is characterized by ID, absent speech, seizures, urogenital anomalies, frequently including a small penis, and skin abnormalities, which include generalized hirsutism, low posterior hairline, myxedematous appearance, widely spaced nipples, and hair whorls. Facial dysmorphisms include a wide face, a depressed nasal bridge, a large mouth with downturned corners, thin vermilion, and a short, broad neck. [less ▲]

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See detailÜber Aetherunterschwefligsäuren und über einige organische Bisulfide
Spring, Walthère ULiege

in Berichte der Deutschen Chemischen Gesellschaft (1882), XV

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See detailUber and competition law: some thoughts in light of the Elite Taxi judgment
Van Cleynenbreugel, Pieter ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, March 09)

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (5 ULiège)
See detailÜber Angst und darüber, wie viel Mut und Phantasie sie erfordert
Pontzen, Alexandra ULiege

in Kiesow; Korte (Eds.) EGB. Emotionales Gesetzbuch. Dekalog der Gefühle (2005)

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See detailÜber das Resonanzspektrum des Schwefeldampfes
Swings, Polydore ULiege

in Zeitschrift für Physik (1930), 61(9-10), 681-699

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See detailÜber das spezifische Gewicht des Kupferjodürs
Spring, Walthère ULiege

in Zeitschrift für Anorganische Chemie (1901), 27

Spring, W. Zeitschrift fuer Anorganische Chemie (1901), 27, 308; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Schiff obtained a value of 4.41 ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Zeitschrift fuer Anorganische Chemie (1901), 27, 308; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Schiff obtained a value of 4.41 for the specific gravity of cuprous iodide, while a redetermination by the author gives 5.631. The importance of this lies in the fact that cuprous iodide is now seen to be formed from the elements with contraction, whereas Schiff's figure called for twenty-four percent expansion. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailÜber das Vorkommen gewisser für den Flüssigkeits- oder Gaszustand charakteristichen Eigenschaften bei festen Metallen
Spring, Walthère ULiege

in Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie, Stöchiometrie und Verwandtschaftslehre (1893), XV

Spring, W. Zeitschrift fuer Physikalische Chemie, Stoechiometrie und Verwandtschaftslehre (1894), 15, 65-78; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July ... [more ▼]

Spring, W. Zeitschrift fuer Physikalische Chemie, Stoechiometrie und Verwandtschaftslehre (1894), 15, 65-78; SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH); https://scifinder.cas.org (accessed July 8, 2010). Many metals, when heated to temperatures considerably below their melting points, exhibit properties characteristic of the liquid state. For examination in this respect, the metals were turned into cylinders with ends as perfectly plane as possible, and placed end to end in an iron holder, pressure being applied by a screw. They were heated in this condition in a hot air bath, filled, if necessary, with an indifferent gas. Cylinders of aluminium, bismuth, cadmium, copper, tin, gold, lead, zinc, antimony, and platinum were employed, and in the first experiment two cylinders of the same metal were used. The temperature was kept for from 4 to 8 hours at from 200° to 400°, and it was found that, except in the case of antimony and platinum, the cylinders had alloyed so perfectly that they could be turned with one end fixed in a lathe, whilst if broken in a vice the fracture did not take place along the original surface of separation. Pairs of different metals were next employed, usually copper or lead with some of the other metals, with the result that, at the junction, an alloy of considerable thickness was formed, 18 mm. in the case of zinc and copper, and 15 mm. in the case of cadmium and copper. In the case of lead and tin, a cavity in the end of one metal was filled with mica, so that contact only took place at the edge. An alloy was formed to the thickness of 15 mm., of which 9 mm. were in the tin and 6 mm. in the lead. By the use of cylinders of copper and zinc, in which, owing to a central cavity, contact only took place at the edges, it was found that the surface of the copper above the cavity was coloured by a yellow alloy resembling that formed when copper is subjected to the action of zinc vapour, and which was not due to diffusion from the edges (see also Abstracts, 1893, ii, 168). For the explanation of these results, which are most marked with soft and non-crystalline metals, the author points out the assumption suffices, that the molecules of solids, like those of fluids, do not all move with the same velocity. Reprinted with the permission of the American Chemical Society. Copyright © 2010. American Chemical Society (ACS). All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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