Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional Phenomenology: Toward a Nonreductive Analysis
Dewalque, Arnaud ULiege

in Midwest Studies in Philosophy (2017), 41

In this article I want to create a presumption in favor of a nonreductive analysis of emotional phenomenology. The presumption relies on the claim that none of the nonemotional elements which are usually ... [more ▼]

In this article I want to create a presumption in favor of a nonreductive analysis of emotional phenomenology. The presumption relies on the claim that none of the nonemotional elements which are usually regarded as constitutive of emotional phenomenology may reasonably be considered responsible for the evaluative character of the latter. In section 1 I suggest this is true of cognitive elements, arguing that so-called ‘evaluative’ judgments usually result from emotional, evaluative attitudes, and should not be conflated with them. In section 2 I argue the same holds true for conative attitudes (desires and acts of the will). And in section 3 I briefly mention some salient aspects of the version of nonreductive analysis I lean toward. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional processing in a non-clinical psychosis-prone sample
Van't Wout, M.; Aleman, A.; Kessels, R. P. C. et al

in Schizophrenia Research (2004), 68

Symptoms of psychosis have been proposed to form part of a continuous distribution of experiences in the general population rather than being an all-or-nothing phenomenon. Indeed, schizotypal signs have ... [more ▼]

Symptoms of psychosis have been proposed to form part of a continuous distribution of experiences in the general population rather than being an all-or-nothing phenomenon. Indeed, schizotypal signs have been reported in subjects from nonclinical samples. Emotional processing has been documented to be deficient in schizophrenia. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis whether putatively psychosis-prone subjects would show abnormalities in emotion processing. Based on the extremes of Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale (LSHS) ratings of 200 undergraduate students, two groups of subjects (total N= 40) were selected. All 40 participants filled in the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ). We compared both groups on an alexithymia questionnaire and on four behavioral emotional information processing tasks. Hallucination-proneness was associated with an increased subjective emotional arousal and fantasy-proneness. Although no differences between the high and low group were observed on three behavioral emotion processing tasks, on the affective word-priming task presentation of emotional stimuli was associated with longer reactions times to neutral words in high schizotypal subjects. Also, SPQ scores correlated with several emotion processing tasks. We conclude that these findings lend partial support to the hypothesis of continuity between symptoms characteristic of schizophrenia and psychosis-related phenomena in the normal population. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (0 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional Processing in Down Syndrome
Catale, Corinne ULiege; Hogge, Michaël; Meulemans, Thierry ULiege et al

in Books of Abstracts: 13th conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology (2003)

In addition to mental retardation, Down Syndrome (DS) children present emotional deficits. Some authors have suggested that the emotional deficits observed in DS can be related to developmental changes ... [more ▼]

In addition to mental retardation, Down Syndrome (DS) children present emotional deficits. Some authors have suggested that the emotional deficits observed in DS can be related to developmental changes. However, the link between emotion and cognitive processing remains unclear.This study aims to assess the relationships between emotional and cognitive processing in DS children. More specifically, we wanted to assess whether cognitive development could predict emotional deficits. Eighteen children DS and 18 chronological age-matched (CA) children were presented with emotional tasks designed to tap their abilities (i) to label emotion through emotional faces and prosody, (ii) to attribute, from stories, cognitive and emotional states to characters and (iii) to process face identity and gaze behaviour. Cognitive functioning was assessed including attentional treatment, visuo-spatial working memory, receptive language and logical reasoning. The results confirmed that DS performed worse on both cognitive and emotional tasks than CA children. There are also strong correlations between cognitive (including language and logical reasoning measures) and emotional measures. These results suggest that emotional troubles in DS are related to their global cognitive development; they also suggest that the degree of mental retardation can predict the importance of emotional deficits in DS. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional regulation impairments following severe traumatic brain injury: an investigation of the body and facial feedback effects
Dethier, Marie ULiege; Blairy, Sylvie ULiege; Rosenberg, Hannah et al

in Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society (2013), 19(4), 367-379

The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body and facial feedback in adults who had suffered from a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in order to gain some understanding of their ... [more ▼]

The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body and facial feedback in adults who had suffered from a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in order to gain some understanding of their difficulties in the regulation of negative emotions. Twenty-four participants with TBI and 28 control participants adopted facial expressions and body postures according to specific instructions and maintained these positions for 10 seconds. Expressions and postures entailed anger, sadness, and happiness as well as a neutral (baseline) condition. After each expression/posture manipulation, participants evaluated their subjective emotional state (including cheerfulness, sadness, and irritation). TBI participants were globally less responsive to the effects of body and facial feedback than control participants, F (1, 50) = 5.89, p = .02, η2 = .11. More interestingly, the TBI group differed from the Control group across emotions, F (8,400) = 2.51, p = .01, η2 = .05. Specifically, participants with TBI were responsive to happy but not to negative expression/posture manipulations whereas control participants were responsive to happy, angry, and sad expression/posture manipulations. In conclusion, TBI appears to impair the ability to recognise both the physical configuration of a negative emotion and its associated subjective feeling. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional Response to Body and Facial Feedback in Alcohol-Dependent Patients
Dethier, Marie ULiege; Duchateau, Régis; El Hawa, Maya et al

in Alcoologie et Addictologie (2013), 35(2), 117-125

Introduction: The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body postures and facial expressions manipulation on subjective feelings in male alcohol dependent (ADs) divided into two ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The object of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of body postures and facial expressions manipulation on subjective feelings in male alcohol dependent (ADs) divided into two groups according to Cloninger’s typology in order to gain some understanding of their difficulties in the regulation of emotions and in interpersonal relationships. Method: Twenty type I ADs, twenty-one type II ADs, and twenty control participants adopted facial expressions and body postures according to specific instructions and maintained these positions for 10 seconds. Expressions and postures entailed anger, sadness, and happiness as well as a neutral (baseline) condition. After each expression/posture manipulation, participants evaluated their subjective emotional state (including cheerfulness, sadness, and irritation). Results: The three groups reported heightened subjective feelings in concordance with the facial and posture manipulation with no difference emerging between AD and control participants, F(1, 60) = 0.01, p = .91, or between the three groups, F(2, 59) = 1.03, p = .36. Conclusions: Similarly to control participants, ADs from the two subtypes may be responsive to the combined effect of facial and body feedback and could, subsequently, benefit from its regulative effects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (22 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Emotional Side of Paternalism: Do People Share What They Feel?
Silvestre, Aude ULiege; Dardenne, Benoît ULiege

Poster (2012, January 28)

We were interested in the kind of emotions felt and socially shared after experiencing paternalism (when A acts toward B with a fatherlike attitude) or blatant hostility. Participants had to read either a ... [more ▼]

We were interested in the kind of emotions felt and socially shared after experiencing paternalism (when A acts toward B with a fatherlike attitude) or blatant hostility. Participants had to read either a paternalist, hostile or factual version of the welcome speech of their new boss. They then were asked to write a text about how this day was going (social sharing measure). The results revealed that being the target of paternalism or hostility is an emotional episode which leads to social sharing of emotion. Hostility is a clearly negative episode, leading to negative social sharing. Paternalism is more ambiguous. Participants felt positive emotions (except for distrust) but they shared both positive and negative ones. Paternalism can be perceived as positive but seems to lead to negative outcomes. Our further step would be to test its negative effects on performance (reading span test). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (12 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotional valence influences the rates of false memories
Dehon, Hedwige ULiege; Van der Linden, Martial; Laroi, Frank ULiege

Poster (2006, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmotions and cognitions. The evolution of the theory of emotions in the first Husserl
Gyemant, Maria ULiege

Conference (2013, June 12)

In the Fifth Logical Investigation, after a series of objections to Brentano’s thesis that presentations constitute the most basic type of mental acts, Husserl offers the alternative of a fundamental ... [more ▼]

In the Fifth Logical Investigation, after a series of objections to Brentano’s thesis that presentations constitute the most basic type of mental acts, Husserl offers the alternative of a fundamental distinction between objectifying and non-objectifying mental acts. Objectifying acts include the first two Brentanian classes: presentations and judgments. Thus the class of emotions is singled out as the typical model for non-objectifying acts. However, Husserl changes his mind on this issue later on. We find a new and rather surprising theory of emotions in his Ideas I of 1913. In the §117 for instance, Husserl states clearly that all acts, emotions included, are objectifying because they all constitute objects. The only difference between emotions and cognitions is that emotions constitute values as their objects. Since all acts are objectifying, the difference is now between kinds of objects rather than kinds of acts. It seems though that the role values play in our mental life is more complicated. Not only are they dependent objects constructed from objects of simple presentations or judgments, but they are also the sort of objects that can motivate other acts. So, while emotions are in Husserl always dependent on cognitions, since wanting something necessarily supposes, as in Brentano, a previous presentation of that thing, certain emotions can also play a foundational role for cognitions. Hence the question addressed in this paper: is the relation between emotions and cognitions a symmetrical one since both can play the role of foundational act for the other? And if this is the case what is the specificity of emotions as mental acts and how can they be distinguished from cognitions? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (0 ULiège)
See detailEmotions et rationalité en philosophie morale : Heidegger?
Pieron, Julien ULiege

Scientific conference (2007, April 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULiège)
See detailEmotions, Stress and their regulations. Application for the business and professional surrounding
Desseilles, Martin ULiege

Scientific conference (2013, February 28)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULiège)
See detailEmotions, volonté, intelligence : Bergson et les sources de la morale
Caeymaex, Florence ULiege

Conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailEmousser le regard, éprouver le propre de l'art. Considérations muséologiques
Hagelstein, Maud ULiege

Article for general public (2014)

À Paris, l’été n’aura pas laissé en reste les amateurs d’expositions non conventionnelles. L’inventivité de certains commissaires – au sens large de la fonction, qui englobe l’artiste comme le ... [more ▼]

À Paris, l’été n’aura pas laissé en reste les amateurs d’expositions non conventionnelles. L’inventivité de certains commissaires – au sens large de la fonction, qui englobe l’artiste comme le collectionneur – semblait d’ailleurs forcer le spectateur à ré-envisager ses attentes. Que cherche-t-on lorsque l’on visite un lieu culturel ? Quels savoirs sont mobilisés, quels autres affectés par la rencontre ? Quelles impressions s’impriment durablement ? Ce type de questionnement est généralement laissé à la recherche en muséologie, qui a pour vocation méta-disciplinaire de réfléchir aux conditions d’exposition observées dans le champ muséal. Mais il arrive que le spectateur se sente lui-même partie prenante du processus critique et qu’il soit directement invité à interroger de l’intérieur les modalités de sa rencontre avec l’art. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (6 ULiège)
See detailL’empathie chez les futurs médecins : innée ou acquise ?
Desert; Nasello, Julian ULiege; Cornet, Annie ULiege et al

Scientific conference (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (4 ULiège)
See detailL’empathie chez les futurs médecins, innée ou acquise ?
Désert, Jean-Benoit; Nasello, Julian ULiege; Cornet, Annie ULiege et al

Conference (2017, January 18)

L’empathie est un processus complexe où interagissent de manière dynamique des composantes affectives, cognitives et sociales. Les étudiants en médecine seraient-ils prédisposés à être empathiques ... [more ▼]

L’empathie est un processus complexe où interagissent de manière dynamique des composantes affectives, cognitives et sociales. Les étudiants en médecine seraient-ils prédisposés à être empathiques ? L’empathie varierait-elle au cours de la formation ? Pour répondre à ces questions, nous avons comparé les niveaux d’empathie chez des étudiants en Médecine (groupe expérimental) en comparaison à des étudiants issus des Hautes Etudes Commerciales (HEC) n’ayant bénéficié d’aucune formation à la relation de soin (groupe contrôle). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (11 ULiège)
See detailEmpathie et anthropologie
Servais, Véronique ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailEmpathie et culpabilité : les émotions au coeur du lien social
Devillers, Bérengère ULiege

in Actes des 17èmes journées de valorisation de la recherche « La place des émotions dans le travail socio-éducatif » (2017, June)

Bonjour à tous, et merci aux organisateurs de m’avoir invitée. C’est un plaisir pour moi d’être là aujourd’hui parmi vous. Je vais tout d’abord revenir sur la traduction du « Good Lives Model ». Plusieurs ... [more ▼]

Bonjour à tous, et merci aux organisateurs de m’avoir invitée. C’est un plaisir pour moi d’être là aujourd’hui parmi vous. Je vais tout d’abord revenir sur la traduction du « Good Lives Model ». Plusieurs traductions sont communément admises, les plus connues étant celles de « modèle de bonne vie » ou « modèle de vie satisfaisante » ou encore « modèle de vies saines ». Il faut savoir que le groupe Antigone, dans lequel je travaille, n’adhère pas vraiment à ces définitions. En effet, nous trouvons que les traductions françaises proposées enferment le sujet dans une vision prescriptive de ce que devraient être les besoins, qu’elles laissent entendre qu’il y aurait des besoins universels auxquels tous les individus devraient répondre. Or nous ne nous y retrouvons pas et cela ne correspond pas à l’intention de Ward qui veut faire référence à une manière de vivre qui est bénéfique pour le sujet lui-même. Je vous propose donc de garder l’appellation anglophone, « Good Lives Model ». Je vais revenir à l’émergence de ce modèle : il s’agit d’un modèle de réhabilitation qui a vu le jour au début des années 2000 sous l’impulsion de Tony Ward, tout d’abord pour le public des auteurs d’infractions à caractère sexuel. Cependant, il s’est rapidement étendu à d’autres populations, notamment les auteurs de violences domestiques, le public psychiatrique, et ce pour le public aussi bien adolescent qu’adulte. D’autres adaptations ont depuis vu le jour, notamment à l’initiative d’un service français, l’ARCA, qui est spécialisé en recherche et en intervention en délinquance sexuelle, et où le directeur, Erwan Dieu, a adapté le Good Lives Model au public radicalisé. Plusieurs expériences ont également été menées en Belgique, notamment une à l’hôpital des Marronniers, à Tournai, dans une unité de défense sociale qui accueille des délinquants sexuels. L’équipe a décidé, suite à une formation, de reprendre les outils du Good Lives Model et de les adapter avec les patients, afin qu’ils correspondent à leur langage, à leur niveau de compréhension et donc à leurs besoins. Le GLM se veut avant tout humaniste, positiviste et tout à fait écologiste, parce qu’il tient compte des différents systèmes qui gravitent autour de la personne. Il a pour première cible de traitement le développement des besoins humains fondamentaux. Sa deuxième cible est la réduction du risque de récidive, mais qui se veut être un effet de la poursuite du bien-être et des besoins des personnes. Le Good Lives Model comprend des principes théoriques et des implications cliniques. Selon un principe prioritaire au niveau théorique, nous considérons que le délinquant est animé par les mêmes besoins humains que tout un chacun, mais que les voies qu’il emprunte ne sont pas pro-sociales. Nous mettrons donc la notion de besoin au centre de la prise en charge, bien plus que le passage à l’acte délinquant. Le principe clinique qui me paraît être le plus en lien avec le thème qui nous occupe aujourd’hui est peut-être la notion de responsabilité à substituer à celle de culpabilité. Je ne connais pas précisément votre cadre légal protectionnel de la jeunesse. En Belgique, dans les mesures qui sont privilégiées par le magistrat de la jeunesse dès lors qu’un jeune a commis un fait qualifié d’infraction, nous retrouvons les mesures réparatrices, mais dans une visée de responsabilisation du jeune, de prise en compte des conséquences dommageables pour les victimes. Tel est le mandat qui est confié aux équipes chargées du suivi du jeune. Dans le cadre de la philosophie du modèle GLM, nous verrons s’opérer un glissement de la notion de responsabilité, qui reposait avant tout sur les épaules du jeune, vers celles de l’intervenant psychosocial et de son environnement proche : les familiers, mais aussi tous les intervenants gravitant autour du jeune. Par quoi cela passe-t-il concrètement ? Tout d’abord le GLM est attentif à la définition du problème. Bien souvent, le problème est libellé soit dans les rapports qui ont été rédigés par au sujet du jeune, soit dans l’ordonnance qui précise notamment la qualification des faits. Nous laisserons cela de côté, et nous repartirons avec le jeune de la définition du problème tel qu’elle se pose pour lui, dans l’ici et maintenant. Nous ne repartirons donc pas du passé, mais nous nous centrerons sur les conséquences pour lui et pour son environnement dans le présent, ce qui suppose que nous devrons nous accorder sur les buts et objectifs de la prise en charge. Le jeune et les intervenants seront donc associés aux différentes phases du plan de traitement, où les intervenants psychosociaux auront également une responsabilité. Par conséquent, ils s’engageront à réaliser des démarches avec le jeune. Par quoi passe encore cette responsabilité ? L’intervenant psychosocial devra créer les conditions propices à un engagement et à un maintien du jeune dans la prise en charge. La notion de disposition au traitement (Treatment Readiness, Ward et al., 2004) nous éclaire ici sur cette question de l’engagement tant de l’usager que de l’intervenant dans le processus de changement. En effet, la disposition au traitement est définie comme étant « la présence de caractéristiques (états et dispositions) dans le chef du délinquant mais aussi de la situation thérapeutique qui sont susceptibles de promouvoir l’engagement dans la thérapie et donc l’amélioration des aptitudes au changement thérapeutique » (Ward et al., 2004). Il existe également un langage assez particulier qui devra être adapté aux besoins et au niveau de développement du jeune. Tony Ward avait initialement énoncé onze besoins fondamentaux, et le GMAP, qui est le service en Nouvelle-Zélande ayant adapté le GLM pour les adolescents, a réduit le nombre de besoins à huit. Les besoins couvriront surtout la santé (émotionnelle, en général et sexuelle) ainsi que les besoins de réalisation, d’amusement, de trouver un sens à sa vie et de développer des relations. Nous travaillerons donc beaucoup tout ce qui est du registre des émotions, soit tout d’abord pouvoir identifier ses émotions avant de pouvoir les gérer. Dans les questions en lien avec le modèle de réhabilitation, il est vrai que nous travaillons le lien social. Or, dans l’optique GLM, nous ferons d’abord passer le lien social par un lien à restaurer du jeune vis-à-vis de lui-même. Dans l’optique GLM, nous considérerons que travailler le lien social et la réparation d’un dommage vis-à-vis de la société sans se soucier d’abord d’une réparation à l’encontre du jeune est anticipé, par rapport au fait de vouloir d’emblée se lancer dans une logique de réparation. Par conséquent, un accent est mis sur une alliance thérapeutique, et le jeune se sentira beaucoup plus concerné puisque nous partirons de sa définition à lui du problème, telle qu’elle se pose pour lui avant tout. Il pourra alors retrouver un sens, et quelque part, sortir un peu de cette stigmatisation, de cet étiquetage qui lui pèse et qui est souvent lié à tout son parcours, ou qui transparaît au travers des différents rapports, des diverses rencontres avec le magistrat ou les intervenants. Cette optique de travail pourra permettre également au jeune de sortir de ses mécanismes de défense, de faciliter une distanciation par rapport aux mécanismes habituels de minimisation, de déni, d’opposition, et nous verrons que les équipes ou les intervenants qui s’imprègnent de principes liés au GLM pourront s’inscrire davantage dans des rapports relationnels s’éloignant de rapports d’opposition, de recadrage (tels que souvent vécus par les équipes). Pour revenir sur l’expérience menée aux Marronniers, il a été constaté, dans les effets au premier plan, une amélioration de la qualité relationnelle avec les patients. Ceux-ci étaient tout à fait étonnés que l’équipe se détache du travail centré exclusivement sur les passages à l’acte, la récidive, les perspectives de réhabilitation, pour s’intéresser à leurs besoins. Le deuxième effet observé concerne le bien-être des travailleurs, qui s’est traduit par une réduction significative du taux d’absentéisme. L’équipe psycho-sociale ressentant en effet davantage de plaisir à travailler les forces plutôt que les déficits de leurs patients. Avec le jeune, nous travaillons aussi la question de la responsabilité active : toujours dans la notion d’ici et maintenant, que pourra engager le jeune, par exemple si un membre de la famille est toujours très préoccupé, s’il s’agit d’un abus intrafamilial, par la réalité du risque au quotidien ? Que peut dire le jeune de son rapport à la sexualité, mais vraiment dans l’ici et maintenant et dans des perspectives futures, dans ce qu’il peut mettre en place pour rassurer sa famille ? Nous travaillons donc le projet du jeune centré sur ses besoins et son avenir, et beaucoup moins le passé. Cela ne veut pas dire qu’il n’y a pas de place pour le travail sur l’empathie, sur les habilités relationnelles, personnelles et sociales, mais nous nous recentrons d’abord sur le jeune, sur les situations d’adversité qu’il a pu rencontrer durant sa trajectoire de vie afin de favoriser une expression libre de ses émotions. Comme nous l’avons vu avec notre collègue Nadine Lanctôt, bien souvent, nous pointons du doigt tous les éléments de victimisation, maltraitance sexuelle, négligence, mais nous oublions tout l’effet des violences plus émotionnelles, plus insidieuses, qui ont également des effets tout à fait délétères sur le développement du jeune. Ainsi, nous trouvons important de travailler toute cette reconnexion du jeune à ses différents états émotionnels, afin qu’il puisse distinguer le registre des idées, des émotions, des sensations physiologiques, pour ensuite pouvoir refaire ce travail vis-à-vis du passage à l’acte. Le GLM offre un cadre conceptuel et opérationnel utile aux professionnels pour intégrer une gamme d’évaluations et d’informations, de supports théoriques et d’outils d’intervention, dans la perspective d’une compréhension riche, cohérente et complémentaire des (et avec leurs) usagers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailL'empathie et la perception des formes dans l'éthologie contemporaine
Servais, Véronique ULiege

in Berthoz, Alain; Jorland, Gerard (Eds.) L'empathie (2004)

The paper states that purely objective descriptions of animal behaviour is impossible. The behavioursit approach of animal behaviour, because it denies an amotional life to the animals, reinfoce ... [more ▼]

The paper states that purely objective descriptions of animal behaviour is impossible. The behavioursit approach of animal behaviour, because it denies an amotional life to the animals, reinfoce anthropomorphism instead of suppressing it. Empathy is seen as a less anthropomorphic stance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 733 (30 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmpathie et Trouble Oppositionnel chez l'enfant de 8 à 12 ans
Dahmen, Caroline; Malpas, Anne; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULiege et al

in Revue Francophone de Clinique Comportementale et Cognitive (2004), IX(1), 3-11

A literature review underlines strong links between facial expression recognition difficulty, lack of empathy and behaviour disorder. The main goal of this study was to assess if, as it is suggested in ... [more ▼]

A literature review underlines strong links between facial expression recognition difficulty, lack of empathy and behaviour disorder. The main goal of this study was to assess if, as it is suggested in the literature, oppositional children presented an empathy deficit that can make them more aggressive. Forty children between 8 and 10 years old (15 control children and 15 oppositional children) were subjected to the “Empathy Response Task” from Ricard et Kamberk-Kilicci (1995). As expected, results show that oppositional children are significantly less empathic that control children. Anger is often assigned to protagonists even when it isn’t present. This can be interpreted by the “hostile attribution distortion” according to wich the children with behaviour disorders tend to allocate hostile intentions to others (Milich & Dodge, 1984). Working on empathy must be integrated in behaviour disorder children therapy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 629 (26 ULiège)