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See detailCarbon xerogels as catalyst supports for PEM fuel cell cathode
Job, Nathalie ULiege; Marie, Julien; Lambert, Stéphanie ULiege et al

Conference (2007)

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See detailCarbon xerogels as catalyst supports for PEM fuel cell cathode
Job, Nathalie ULiege; Marie, J.; Lambert, Stéphanie ULiege et al

in Energy Conversion and Management (2008), 49

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See detailCarbon xerogels as catalyst supports: study of mass transfer
Job, Nathalie ULiege; Heinrichs, Benoît ULiege; Lambert, Stéphanie ULiege et al

in AIChE Journal (2006), 52

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See detailCarbon xerogels as model materials: toward a relationship between pore texture and electrochemical behavior as anodes for lithium-ion batteries
Piedboeuf, Marie-Laure ULiege; Léonard, Alexandre ULiege; Deschamps, Fabien ULiege et al

in Journal of Materials Science (2016), 51(9), 4358-4370

The mechanisms of Li+ insertion in porous hard carbons used as anodes for Li-ion batteries are still a matter of debate, especially considering the divergence of electrochemical performances observed in ... [more ▼]

The mechanisms of Li+ insertion in porous hard carbons used as anodes for Li-ion batteries are still a matter of debate, especially considering the divergence of electrochemical performances observed in literature. Since these materials usually exhibit several levels of porosity, the pore texture vs. electrochemical behavior relationship is difficult to establish. In this paper, we propose to use carbon xerogels, prepared from aqueous resorcinol-formaldehyde mixtures, as model materials for Li-ion battery anodes to study the influence of the pore texture on the overall electrochemical behavior. Indeed, carbon xerogels are described as microporous nodules linked together to form meso- or macroporous voids inside a 3D gel structure; the size of these voids can be tuned by changing the synthesis conditions without affecting other parameters such as the micropore volume. The materials are chosen so as to obtain identical average particle sizes, homogeneous coatings with similar thicknesses and a comparable surface chemistry. The electrochemical behavior of carbon xerogels as Li-ion anodes are correlated with the surface accessible to the electrolyte and are not dependent on the total specific surface area calculated by the BET method from nitrogen adsorption isotherms. The key parameter proposed to understand their behavior is the external surface area of the nodules, which corresponds to the surface of the meso/macropores. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon xerogels as supports for catalysts and electrocatalysts
Job, Nathalie ULiege; Berthon-Fabry, S.; Lambert, Stéphanie ULiege et al

in Proceedings of the International Carbon Conference 2009 (2009)

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See detailCarbon xerogels as supports for catalysts and electrocatalysts
Job, Nathalie ULiege; Berthon-Fabry, S.; Lambert, Stéphanie ULiege et al

Conference (2009, June 14)

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See detailCarbon, Nitrogen and Sulphur isotopic fractionation in captive juvenile hooded seal (Cystophora cristata): application for diet analysis
Pinzone, Marianna ULiege; Acquarone, Mario; Huyghebaert, Loreen ULiege et al

in Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry (2017)

Rationale: Intrinsic biogeochemical markers, such as stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur are increasingly used to trace the trophic ecology of marine top predators. However, insufficient ... [more ▼]

Rationale: Intrinsic biogeochemical markers, such as stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur are increasingly used to trace the trophic ecology of marine top predators. However, insufficient knowledge of fractionation processes in tissues continues to hamper the use of these markers.Methods: We performed a controlled feeding experiment with eight juvenile hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) that were held on a herring-based diet (Clupea harengus) for two years. Stable isotope ratios were measured via isotope ratio mass spectrometry in three of their tissues and related to values of these markers in their diet. Results: Diet-tissue isotope enrichment (trophic enrichment factor, TEF) values between dietary herring and seal tissues for carbon (Δ13C) were + 0.7 ‰ for red blood cells, + 1.9 ‰ for hair and + 1.1 ‰ for muscle. The TEFs for nitrogen trophic (Δ15N) were + 3.3 ‰ for red blood cells, + 3.6 ‰ for hair and + 4.3 ‰ for muscle. For sulphur, the Δ34S values were +1.1 ‰ for red blood cells, + 1.0 ‰ for hair and + 0.9 ‰ for muscle.Conclusions: These enrichment values were greater than those previously measured in adult seals. This increase may be related to the higher rate of protein synthesis and catabolism in growing animals. This study is the first report on sulphur isotope enrichment values for a marine mammal species. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfide budgets in the Black Sea: A biogeochemical model of the whole water column coupling the oxic and anoxic parts
Grégoire, Marilaure ULiege; Soetaert, Karline

in Ecological Modelling (2010)

Carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfide budgets are derived for the Black Sea water column from a coupled physical-biogeochemical model. The model is applied in the deep part of the sea and simulates ... [more ▼]

Carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfide budgets are derived for the Black Sea water column from a coupled physical-biogeochemical model. The model is applied in the deep part of the sea and simulates processes over the whole water column including the anoxic layer that extends from ~ 115 m to the bottom (~ 2000 m). The biogeochemical model involves a refined representation of the Black Sea foodweb from bacteria to gelatinous carnivores. It includes notably a series of biogeochemical processes typical for oxygen deficient conditions with, for instance, bacterial respiration using different types of oxidants (i.e denitrification, sulfate reduction), the lower efficiency of detritus degradation, the ANAMMOX (ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation) process and the occurrence of particular redox reactions. The model has been calibrated and validated against all available data gathered in the Black Sea TU Ocean Base and this exercise is described in Gregoire et al., (2008). In the present paper, we focus on the biogeochemical flows produced by the model and we compare model estimations with the measurements performed during the R.V. KNORR expedition conducted in the Black Sea from April to July 1988 (Murray and the Black Sea Knorr Expedition, 1991). Model estimations of hydrogen sulfide oxidation, metal sulfide precipitation, hydrogen sulfide formation in the sediments and water column, export flux to the anoxic layer and to the sediments, denitrification, primary and bacterial production are in the range of field observations. With a simulated Gross Primary Production (GPP) of 7.9 molC m-2 yr-1 and a Community Respiration (CR) of 6.3 molC m-2 yr-1, the system is net autotrophic with a Net Community Production (NCP) of 1.6 molC m-2 yr-1. This NCP corresponds to 20 % of the GPP and is exported to the anoxic layer. In order to model Particulate Organic Matter (POM) fluxes to the bottom and hydrogen sulfide profiles in agreement with in-situ observations, we have to consider that the degradation of POM in anoxic conditions is less efficient that in oxygenated waters as it has often been observed (see discussion in Hedges et al., 1999). The vertical POM profile produced by the model can be fitted to the classic power function describing the oceanic carbon rate (CR=Z-) using an attenuation coefficient  of 0.36 which is the value proposed for another anoxic environment (i.e. the Mexico Margin) by Devol and Hartnett, (2001). Due to the lower efficiency of detritus degradation in anoxic conditions and to the aggregation of particles that enhanced the sinking, an important part of the export to the anoxic layer (i.e. 33 %, 0.52 molC m-2 yr-1) escapes remineralization in the water column and reaches the sediments. Therefore, sediments are active sites of sulfide production contributing to 26 % of the total sulfide production. In the upper layer, the oxygen dynamics is mainly governed by photosynthesis and respiration processes as well as by air-sea exchanges. ~ 71 % of the oxygen produced by phytoplankton (photosynthesis + nitrate reduction) is lost through respiration, ~ 21 % by outgasing to the atmosphere, ~ 5 % through nitrification and only ~ 2 % in the oxidation of reduced components (e.g. Mn2+, Fe2+, H2S). The model estimates the amount of nitrogen lost through denitrification at 307 mmolN m-2 yr-1 that can be partitioned into a loss of ~ 55 % through the use of nitrate for the oxidation of detritus in low oxygen conditions, ~ 40 % in the ANAMMOX process and the remaining ~ 5% in the oxidation of reduced substances by nitrate. In agreement with data analysis performed on long time series collected since the 1960's (Konovalov and Murray, 2001), the sulfide and nitrogen budgets established for the anoxic layer are not balanced in response to the enhanced particle fluxes induced by eutrophication: the NH4 and H2S concentrations increase. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon-isotope analysis of fossil wood and dispersed organic matter from the terrestrial Wealden facies of Hautrage (Mons Basin, Belgium).
Yans, Johan; Gerards, Thomas ULiege; Gerrienne, Philippe ULiege et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2010), 291

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See detailCarbonate chemistry in the coastal zone responds more strongly to eutrophication than to ocean acidification
Borges, Alberto ULiege; Gypens, N.

in Limnology & Oceanography (2010), 55(1), 346-353

The accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 in the ocean has altered carbonate chemistry in surface waters since preindustrial times and is expected to continue to do so in the coming centuries. Changes in ... [more ▼]

The accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 in the ocean has altered carbonate chemistry in surface waters since preindustrial times and is expected to continue to do so in the coming centuries. Changes in carbonate chemistry can modify the rates and fates of marine primary production and calcification. These modifications can in turn lead to feedback on increasing atmospheric CO2. We show, using a numerical model, that in highly productive nearshore coastal marine environments, the effect of eutrophication on carbon cycling can counter the effect of ocean acidification on the carbonate chemistry of surface waters. Also, changes in river nutrient delivery due to management regulation policies can lead to stronger changes in carbonate chemistry than ocean acidification. Whether antagonistic or synergistic, the response of carbonate chemistry to changes of nutrient delivery to the coastal zone (increase or decrease, respectively) is stronger than ocean acidification. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbonate dissolution in the turbid and eutrophic Loire estuary
Abril, Gwenaël; Etcheber, Henri; Delille, Bruno ULiege et al

in Marine Ecology. Progress Series (2003), 259

We measured particulate and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC), chlorophyll, oxygen, partial pressure of Co-2, pH, total alkalinity (TAlk) and particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) during a late summer ... [more ▼]

We measured particulate and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC), chlorophyll, oxygen, partial pressure of Co-2, pH, total alkalinity (TAlk) and particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) during a late summer cruise in the eutrophic Loire estuary. These parameters reveal an intense mineralisation of organic matter in the estuarine maximum turbidity zone (MTZ) that results in oxygen deficits (down to 20% of the saturation level) and high CO2 oversaturations (pCO(2) up to 2900 muatm). Several facts revealed the occurrence of carbonate dissolution in the Loire MTZ: large amounts of alkalinity were produced in the upper estuary, increasing its transfer to the ocean by 30%; the calculated saturation index showed a net undersaturation for aragonite and a slight undersaturation for calcite in the MTZ; and PIC decreased from 2.1% (% dry weight) in riverine suspension to 0.4% in the MTZ. A stoichiometric approach is used to assess the coupling between aerobic respiration and carbonate dissolution, where apparent oxygen utilisation, excess CO2, TAlk and dissolved inorganic carbon are compared quantitatively. About 20%, of the CO2 generated by respiration was involved in carbonate dissolution. The loss of PIC at the river-estuary transition quantitatively corresponds to the amount of authigenic calcite precipitated upstream in the highly eutrophic river. This suggests that CO2 exchange with the atmosphere along the eutrophic river-estuary continuum is buffered by carbonate precipitation in the autotrophic river and its dissolution in the heterotrophic estuary. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbonate Mounds: from Paradox to World Heritage
Henriet, Jean-Pierre; Hamoumi, N.; Da Silva, Anne-Christine ULiege et al

in Marine Geology (2014), 352

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See detailThe carbonate system in the North Sea: sensitivity and model validation
Artioli, Y.; Blackford, J.C.; Butenschön, M. et al

in Journal of Marine Systems (2012), 102-104

The ocean plays an important role in regulating the climate, acting as a sink for carbon dioxide, perturbing the carbonate system and resulting in a slow decrease of seawater pH. Understanding the ... [more ▼]

The ocean plays an important role in regulating the climate, acting as a sink for carbon dioxide, perturbing the carbonate system and resulting in a slow decrease of seawater pH. Understanding the dynamics of the carbonate system in shelf sea regions is necessary to evaluate the impact of Ocean Acidification (OA) in these societally important ecosystems. Complex hydrodynamic and ecosystem coupled models provide a method of capturing the significant heterogeneity of these areas. However rigorous validation is essential to properly assess the reliability of such models. The coupled model POLCOMS–ERSEM has been implemented in the North Western European shelf with a new parameterization for alkalinity explicitly accounting for riverine inputs and the influence of biological processes. The model has been validated in a like with like comparison with North Sea data from the CANOBA dataset. The model shows good to reasonable agreement for the principal variables, physical (temperature and salinity), biogeochemical nutrients) and carbonate system (dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity), but simulation of the erived variables, pH and pCO2, are not yet fully satisfactory. This high uncertainty is attributed mostly o riverine forcing and primary production. This study suggests that the model is a useful tool to provide information on Ocean Acidification scenarios, but uncertainty on pH and pCO2 needs to be reduced, particularly when impacts of OA on ecosystem functions are included in the model systems. [less ▲]

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