Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLes cardiomyopathies dans l’espèce bovine
Brihoum, Mounir ULiege; Rollin, Frédéric ULiege; Amory, Hélène ULiege

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2009), 153(3), 156-163

Cardiomyopathies in cattle are disorders that are sometimes encountered by rural practitioner. They usually lead to cardiac dysfunction, heart failure, arrhythmias and even sudden death. Most of ... [more ▼]

Cardiomyopathies in cattle are disorders that are sometimes encountered by rural practitioner. They usually lead to cardiac dysfunction, heart failure, arrhythmias and even sudden death. Most of cardiomyopathies in cattle are of hereditary, nutritional or toxic origin. Bovine cardiomyopathies may involve only one animal as they may affect several animals of the farm and can cause considerable economic losses either in treatment costs, decrease of zootechnical performances or in mortality. The etiological variability of cardiomyopathies as well as non-specificity of clinical signs often complicate the diagnostic approach of the practitioner. In this paper, a literature review on cardiomyopathies that may occur in cattle is proposed. Their different aetiologies and clinical aspects as well as diagnostic means in affected cattle are discussed [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 119 (34 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLa cardiomyoplastie
RADERMECKER, Marc ULiege; Fourny, J.; Limet, Raymond ULiege

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1992), 47(3), 140-4

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiopathies congénitales de l'enfant et remodeling myocardique
SEGHAYE, Marie-Christine ULiege

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69(S2), 3-7

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiopoietic stem cell therapy in heart failure: the C-CURE (Cardiopoietic stem Cell therapy in heart failURE) multicenter randomized trial with lineage-specified biologics.
Bartunek, Jozef; Behfar, Atta; Dolatabadi, Dariouch et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2013), 61(23), 2329-38

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate the feasibility and safety of autologous bone marrow-derived and cardiogenically oriented mesenchymal stem cell therapy and to probe for signs of efficacy in ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate the feasibility and safety of autologous bone marrow-derived and cardiogenically oriented mesenchymal stem cell therapy and to probe for signs of efficacy in patients with chronic heart failure. BACKGROUND: In pre-clinical heart failure models, cardiopoietic stem cell therapy improves left ventricular function and blunts pathological remodeling. METHODS: The C-CURE (Cardiopoietic stem Cell therapy in heart failURE) trial, a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial, was conducted in patients with heart failure of ischemic origin who received standard of care or standard of care plus lineage-specified stem cells. In the cell therapy arm, bone marrow was harvested and isolated mesenchymal stem cells were exposed to a cardiogenic cocktail. Derived cardiopoietic stem cells, meeting release criteria under Good Manufacturing Practice, were delivered by endomyocardial injections guided by left ventricular electromechanical mapping. Data acquisition and analysis were performed in blinded fashion. The primary endpoint was feasibility/safety at 2-year follow-up. Secondary endpoints included cardiac structure/function and measures of global clinical performance 6 months post-therapy. RESULTS: Mesenchymal stem cell cocktail-based priming was achieved for each patient with the dose attained in 75% and delivery without complications in 100% of cases. There was no evidence of increased cardiac or systemic toxicity induced by cardiopoietic cell therapy. Left ventricular ejection fraction was improved by cell therapy (from 27.5 +/- 1.0% to 34.5 +/- 1.1%) versus standard of care alone (from 27.8 +/- 2.0% to 28.0 +/- 1.8%, p < 0.0001) and was associated with a reduction in left ventricular end-systolic volume (-24.8 +/- 3.0 ml vs. -8.8 +/- 3.9 ml, p < 0.001). Cell therapy also improved the 6-min walk distance (+62 +/- 18 m vs. -15 +/- 20 m, p < 0.01) and provided a superior composite clinical score encompassing cardiac parameters in tandem with New York Heart Association functional class, quality of life, physical performance, hospitalization, and event-free survival. CONCLUSIONS: The C-CURE trial implements the paradigm of lineage guidance in cell therapy. Cardiopoietic stem cell therapy was found feasible and safe with signs of benefit in chronic heart failure, meriting definitive clinical evaluation. (C-Cure Clinical Trial; NCT00810238). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiopulmonary exercise testing is a better outcome predictor than exercise echocardiography in asymptomatic aortic stenosis.
Domanski, Olivia; Richardson, Marjorie; Coisne, Augustin et al

in International Journal of Cardiology (2017), 227

BACKGROUND: Objective assessment of maximal aerobic capacity using peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) can be helpful in the management of patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). The relationship ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Objective assessment of maximal aerobic capacity using peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) can be helpful in the management of patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). The relationship between peak VO2 and AS severity criteria derived from rest and supine exercise echocardiography (SEE) has never been explored. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine whether low peak VO2 (<85% of predicted value) is associated with severity parameters in SEE, and poor clinical outcome. METHODS: Fifty one asymptomatic patients (mean age of 54+/-21years) with moderate to severe aortic stenosis (Vmax>3m/s) and left ventricle ejection fraction>50% prospectively underwent resting and SEE and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX). RESULTS: Peak VO2 was lower than expected (21.9+/-7.4mL/kg/min), i.e. <85% of predicted value in 57% patients, secondary to cardiac limitation in most of them (69%). In multiple regression analysis, age, BMI and female gender were the only independent determinants of peak VO2. Interestingly no parameter derived from SEE was associated with peak VO2. After 21+/-7month follow-up, no patient died, 20 underwent cardiac surgery. Peak VO2<85% of predicted value was associated with lower event free survival compared to normal peak VO2 (57%+/-11% vs 93+/-6%, p=0.036) whereas no exercise echocardiographic parameter could predict such events. Peak VO2>/=85% had a negative predictive value of 97%. CONCLUSION: CPX detects a high proportion of false asymptomatic AS patients with poorer outcome that cannot be predicted by SEE markers of AS severity. Assessment of aerobic capacity should be part of current approach within a "watchful waiting" strategy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (2 ULiège)
See detailCardiopulmonary resuscitation
Brichant, Jean-François ULiege

Conference (2006, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardioPulse: cardiac imaging of adult cancer patients on chemotherapy.
Galderisi, Maurizio; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULiege

in European heart journal (2015), 36(15), 889-90

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (0 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiorespiratory emergency. Synoptic table for immediate diagnosis and action
Lamy, Maurice ULiege; Lauwers, P.; Mundeleer, P. et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (1980), 31

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiorespiratory measurements and indices of oxidative stress in exercising COPD horses
Art, Tatiana ULiege; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Smith, Nicola et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement (1999), 30

The effect of a COPD crisis on arterial blood gases, heart rate, lactate and indices of oxidative stress were investigated before, during and 1 h after a 'run up to fatigue' in 6 COPD horses. They were ... [more ▼]

The effect of a COPD crisis on arterial blood gases, heart rate, lactate and indices of oxidative stress were investigated before, during and 1 h after a 'run up to fatigue' in 6 COPD horses. They were investigated twice, randomly: once in acute crisis (C) and once in clinical remission (R). Arterial and mixed venous blood samples were collected and analysed for partial pressures in O2 and CO2. The mixed venous blood was also analysed for plasma lactate (LA) and packed cell volume (PCV), as well as for indices of oxidative stress, i.e. reduced glutathione, glutathione disulphide, glutathione redox ratio (GRR) and lipid hydroperoxides (LPH). The exercise test was an effort of increasing intensity on a treadmill at 0% slope, which was stopped when the horses showed signs of exhaustion. Their performance was evaluated by the number of steps and the running time in the last step. Heart rate was monitored continuously during the test. Blood sampling was performed before, just after and 1 h after the end of the test. The COPD crisis significantly reduced the time to fatigue. However, despite the fact that the exercise intensity and length were lower, peak HR and peak LA were similar in C and R, while arterial hypoxaemia and hypercapnia, and PCV were significantly higher in C, indicating a higher physiological stress in this condition. By contrast, the oxidative stress seemed to be higher in R than in C as suggested by the fact that, 1 h after exercise, GRR and LPH were significantly increased with regards to their pre-exercise values in R and not in C. The fact that exercise did not induce an oxidative stress in C could be partly related to (1) the lower exercise intensity reached by the horses, and (2) to the more severe hypoxaemia experienced in this condition. In conclusion, COPD horses in acute crisis show a significant decrease in performance. The reasons for this exercise intolerance remain unclear, but do not appear to be related to any increase of the oxidative stress in C. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (10 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLa cardiotoxicité des traitements anti-cancéreux
FRERES, Pierre ULiege; PONCIN, Aurélie ULiege; MOONEN, Marie ULiege et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2016), 71(9), 382-387

Les cancers sont de plus en plus fréquents et leurs traitements de plus en plus agressifs. En conséquence, les médecins se trouvent régulièrement confrontés aux effets secondaires des traitements ... [more ▼]

Les cancers sont de plus en plus fréquents et leurs traitements de plus en plus agressifs. En conséquence, les médecins se trouvent régulièrement confrontés aux effets secondaires des traitements cytotoxiques. La cardiotoxicité induite par les traitements anti-cancéreux est une complication gravissime, car elle peut être mortelle et provoque un arrêt temporaire, voire définitif, des traitements. Dans cet article, nous décrivons les mécanismes, le dépistage et la prise en charge multidisciplinaire de la cardiotoxicité des agents anti-cancéreux. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (15 ULiège)
See detailCardiovascular and cortisol responses to highly emotional simulated interviews
Bragard, Isabelle ULiege

Scientific conference (2006, May 09)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiovascular and lung mesh generation based on centerlines
Marchandise, E.; Geuzaine, Christophe ULiege; Remacle, Jean-Francois

in International journal for numerical methods in biomedical engineering (2013), 29(6), 665-682

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiovascular effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors: From risk factors to clinical outcomes.
SCHEEN, André ULiege

in Postgraduate Medicine (2013), 125(3), 7-20

Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (gliptins) are oral incretin-based glucose-lowering agents with proven efficacy and safety in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In addition ... [more ▼]

Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (gliptins) are oral incretin-based glucose-lowering agents with proven efficacy and safety in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In addition, preclinical data and mechanistic studies suggest a possible additional non-glycemic beneficial action on blood vessels and the heart, via both glucagon-like peptide-1-dependent and glucagon-like peptide-1-independent effects. As a matter of fact, DPP-4 inhibitors improve several cardiovascular risk factors: they improve glucose control (mainly by reducing the risk of postprandial hyperglycemia) and are weight neutral; may lower blood pressure somewhat; improve postprandial (and even fasting) lipemia; reduce inflammatory markers; diminish oxidative stress; improve endothelial function; and reduce platelet aggregation in patients with T2DM. In addition, positive effects on the myocardium have been described in patients with ischemic heart disease. Results of post hoc analyses of phase 2/3 controlled trials suggest a possible cardioprotective effect with a trend (sometimes significant) toward lower incidence of major cardiovascular events with sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, or alogliptin compared with placebo or other active glucose-lowering agents. However, the definite relationship between DPP-4 inhibition and better cardiovascular outcomes remains to be proven. Major prospective clinical trials involving various DPP-4 inhibitors with predefined cardiovascular outcomes are under way in patients with T2DM and a high-risk cardiovascular profile: the Sitagliptin Cardiovascular Outcome Study (TECOS) on sitagliptin, the Saxagliptin Assessment of Vascular Outcomes Recorded in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (SAVOR-TIMI) 53 trial on saxagliptin, the Cardiovascular Outcomes Study of Alogliptin in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes and Acute Coronary Syndrome (EXAMINE) trial on alogliptin, and the Cardiovascular Outcome Study of Linagliptin Versus Glimepiride in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes (CAROLINA) on linagliptin. If these trials confirm that a DPP-4 inhibitor can reduce the cardiovascular burden of T2DM, it would be major progress that would dramatically influence the management of the disease. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 246 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiovascular effects of gliptins.
SCHEEN, André ULiege

in Nature Reviews. Cardiology (2013), 10(2), 73-84

Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (commonly referred to as gliptins) are a novel class of oral antihyperglycaemic agents with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus ... [more ▼]

Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (commonly referred to as gliptins) are a novel class of oral antihyperglycaemic agents with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Preclinical data and mechanistic studies have indicated a possible beneficial action on blood vessels and the heart, via both glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)-dependent and GLP-1-independent effects. DPP-4 inhibition increases the concentration of many peptides with potential vasoactive and cardioprotective effects. Clinically, DPP-4 inhibitors improve several risk factors in patients with T2DM. They improve blood glucose control (mainly by reducing postprandial glycaemia), are weight neutral (or even induce modest weight loss), lower blood pressure, improve postprandial lipaemia, reduce inflammatory markers, diminish oxidative stress, and improve endothelial function. Some positive effects on the heart have also been described in patients with ischaemic heart disease or congestive heart failure, although their clinical relevance requires further investigation. Post-hoc analyses of phase II-III, controlled trials suggest a possible cardioprotective effect with a trend for a lower incidence of major cardiovascular events with gliptins than with placebo or active agents. However, the actual relationship between DPP-4 inhibition and cardiovascular outcomes remains to be proven. Major prospective clinical trials with predefined cardiovascular outcomes and involving various DPP-4 inhibitors are now underway in patients with T2DM and a high-risk cardiovascular profile. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (4 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiovascular effects of intravenous tolmesoxide in hypertensive patients.
Scheen, André ULiege; Luyckx, A. S.; De Graeve, Jean ULiege

in Archives Internationales de Pharmacodynamie et de Thérapie (1981), 251(2), 322-34

Tolmesoxide, a potent vasodilating compound, was infused intravenously (0.5 to 3.5 mg/kg b.w., rate of infusion: 2.5 to 10.0 mg/min during 7--25 min, 2 or 3 successive infusions separated by a 30 min rest ... [more ▼]

Tolmesoxide, a potent vasodilating compound, was infused intravenously (0.5 to 3.5 mg/kg b.w., rate of infusion: 2.5 to 10.0 mg/min during 7--25 min, 2 or 3 successive infusions separated by a 30 min rest period) in 7 hypertensive patients. An abrupt fall in blood pressure and heart rate occurred in 4 patients whereas 2 patients exhibited almost no hemodynamic response. The remaining case suffering from renovascular hypertension responded with a progressive dose-dependent decrease in blood pressure. No obvious correlation could be demonstrated between the drug plasma levels (ranging between 1.0 and 11.1 microgram/ml) and the hemodynamic effects among the 7 patients studied. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiovascular haemodynamics and ventriculo-arterial coupling in an acute pig model of coronary ischaemia-reperfusion
Lanoye, Lieve; Segers, Patrick; Tchana-Sato, Vincent ULiege et al

in Experimental Physiology (2007), 92(1), 127-137

Although reperfusion after coronary occlusion is mandatory for myocardial salvage, reperfusion may trigger a cascade of harmful events (reperfusion injury) adding to myocardial injury. We investigated ... [more ▼]

Although reperfusion after coronary occlusion is mandatory for myocardial salvage, reperfusion may trigger a cascade of harmful events (reperfusion injury) adding to myocardial injury. We investigated effects of reperfusion on left ventricular (LV) haemodynamics and ventriculo-arterial (VA) coupling in pigs following acute myocardial ischaemia induced by coronary artery occlusion. Experiments were performed in six animals, with measurements of cardiac and arterial function at baseline, after 60 min of ischaemia (T60) and after 2 (T180) and 4 h of reperfusion (T300). Ventriculo-arterial coupling was assessed using the ventriculo-arterial elastance ratio of paper, as well as using a 'stiffness coupling' and 'temporal coupling' index. Reperfusion following ischaemia (T180 versus T60) induced a progressive decline in cardiovascular function, evidenced by a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure, cardiac output and ejection fraction which was not restored at T300. Although reperfusion also induced an increase in slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship (ESPVR), the ESPVR curve shifted to the right, associated with a depression of contractile function. Histology demonstrated irreversible myocardial damage at T300. The ventriculo-arterial elastance ratio and the 'stiffness coupling' index were unaffected throughout the protocol, but the 'temporal coupling' parameter indicated a relative shift between heart period and the time constant of the arterial system. It is unlikely that these alterations are attributable to ischaemic injury alone. The combination of both the stiffness and temporal coupling index may provide more information when studying ventriculo-arterial coupling than the more commonly used ventricular end-systolic stiffness/effection arterial elastance (E-es/E-a) ratio. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (16 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiovascular imaging practice in Europe: a report from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULiege; Plonska-Gosciniak, Edyta; Garbi, Madalina et al

in European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging (2015), 16(7), 697-702

The need for cardiovascular imaging (CVI) is expected to increase over the coming years due to the changes in CV disease epidemiology and ageing of the population. However, reliable statistics on CVI ... [more ▼]

The need for cardiovascular imaging (CVI) is expected to increase over the coming years due to the changes in CV disease epidemiology and ageing of the population. However, reliable statistics on CVI practice in Europe are lacking. Establishing the current status of the use of CVI across Europe has become the first comprehensive project of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging and the European Society of Cardiology Taskforce on CVI. In 2013, a survey with relevant information regarding CVI was sent to all National Imaging/Echocardiography Societies and Working Groups. Representatives from 41 countries returned the questionnaire. The present report provides key results of the survey, relating to existing education, training, certification and national accreditation programmes, healthcare organizations, and reimbursement systems. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiovascular imaging.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULiege; Habib, Gilbert; Negila, Danilo et al

in European heart journal (2014), 35(18), 1161-2

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe cardiovascular impact of intense eccentric isokinetic exercise versus aerobic treadmill running
LE GOFF, Caroline ULiege; Kaux, Jean-François ULiege; LAURENT, Terry ULiege et al

in Isokinetics & Exercise Science (2016), 24(3), 201-208

BACKGROUND: Regular physical activity is an important health factor, but intense physical stress can increase the risk of heart disease. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to determine the potential cardiac ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Regular physical activity is an important health factor, but intense physical stress can increase the risk of heart disease. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to determine the potential cardiac repercussions of, and the oxidative stress resulting from a maximal eccentric isokinetic exercise and a 1-hour treadmill run at 75% ˙V O2 max (maximal exercise done 6 weeks before). METHODS: Twelve young sedentary healthy subjects randomly performed two tests separated by 6 weeks: 1) 3 sets of 30 maximal eccentric isokinetic contractions of the quadriceps; 2) a 1-hour running on treadmill at 75% ˙V O2 max. We drew blood samples just before each exercise (T1), and just after (T2), 3 hours after (T3), and 24 hours after (T4) the end of each exercise to measure cardiac and oxidative stress biomarkers. RESULTS: In the running group, we observed significant differences for myoglobin (T3: 145 ± 80 μg/L), creatinine kinase (T4: 593 ± 350 mg/L), oxidized glutathione (T2: 22 ± 15.6 μmol/L), and highly sensitive cardiac troponin T, (T3: 0.051 ± 0.038 ng/mL). In the isokinetic group, we observed significant differences for myoglobin (T3:1419 ± 2533 mg/L), creatine kinase (3303 ± 7159 mg/L), and oxidized glutathione (T4:24 ± 14 μmol/L). Between isokinetic exercise and running, we observed significant differences for uric acid (p < 0.05, running > eccentric), myoglobin (p < 0.05, ditto), NT-proBNP (p < 0.05, ditto), hsTnT (p < 0.01, ditto), and oxidized glutathione (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: As cardiac biomarkers appear practically unmodified after the isokinetic exercise, despite the considerable oxidative stress, we suggest that the application of intense maximal eccentric isokinetic exercise, when indicated, should be safe for most patients including those whose cardiac status is unknown. On the other hand, the increase in cardiac biomarkers observed after running, could reflect leakage of these biomarkers from the cytosolic pool of cardiac cells, linked to membrane damage, rather than the result of a major injury and hence running is supposed to be a safe practice. However, since sudden death during running has been previously described, assesment of the cardiac biomarkers and a follow-up by a sport doctor is important especially if there is a cardiac family history. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (10 ULiège)