Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
See detailL'utopie ou le traité de la meilleure forme de gouvernement
More, Thomas; Delcourt, Marie ULiege

Book published by E. Droz (1942)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (3 ULiège)
See detailUne utopie post-tiersmondiste : La dimension culturelle du développement.
Poncelet, Marc ULiege

Book published by L'Harmattan - L'Harmattan (1994)

An essay on the cultural dimension of development as North-South paradigm.

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUtopie voor morgen: digitale gezondheidszorg
Geris, Liesbet ULiege

in Pattyn, Bart; d'Hoine (Eds.) Lessen voor de eenentwintigste eeuw (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 ULiège)
See detailLES UTOPIES D'ENGLEBERT : QUAND L'ESPRIT NOUVEAU SOUFFLAIT JUSQU'À LIÈGE.
Bodart, Céline ULiege

Scientific conference (2017, November 23)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (4 ULiège)
See detailLes utopies de Jean Englebert
Charlier, Sébastien ULiege

Book published by Groupe d'ateliers de recherche (2017)

Ce numéro d’Archidoc s’intéresse à la pensée et l’œuvre de Jean Englebert, ingénieur civil architecte et professeur émérite de l’Université de Liège. Deux grands axes sont abordés : la ville de demain et ... [more ▼]

Ce numéro d’Archidoc s’intéresse à la pensée et l’œuvre de Jean Englebert, ingénieur civil architecte et professeur émérite de l’Université de Liège. Deux grands axes sont abordés : la ville de demain et l’industrialisation du logement. IDe manière rétrospective, avec la présentation d’archives en provenance du fonds Jean Englebert conservé au GAR. De manière plus actuelle, par le biais de textes, dessins, photomontages et maquettes réalisés par des enseignants et des étudiants des Facultés d’Architecture et de Sciences appliquées de l’ULg. Ce numéro s’inscrit également dans le cadre des festivités du Bicentenaire de l’Université de Liège. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (4 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailUtopisme in de Belgische literatuur na WO1 : een casestudy
Mus, Francis ULiege

Conference (2008, November 27)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailUV and visible planetary auroral emissions: Jupiter and Saturn
Grodent, Denis ULiege

Conference (2011, October)

In the giant planets upper atmosphere, collisions of auroral electrons with atmospheric H atoms and H2 molecules, following acceleration along magnetic field lines, give rise to excitation of these ... [more ▼]

In the giant planets upper atmosphere, collisions of auroral electrons with atmospheric H atoms and H2 molecules, following acceleration along magnetic field lines, give rise to excitation of these primary neutrals. Excited H and H2 almost immediately loose part of (~15%) their excess energy through radiative decay processes implying emission of FUV, EUV, NUV and visible light. An observer located near Earth orbit will only see the sunlit portion of the giant planets for which the reflected sunlight outshines a large portion of the hydrogen auroral emissions. Fortunately, the solar spectrum drops by several orders of magnitude in the FUV-EUV bandpass and is further attenuated by low altitude hydrocarbon haze produced in the polar regions. This makes it possible to observe Jupiter and Saturn EUV and FUV auroras from Earth orbit with, for example, the UV cameras onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. These cameras provided numerous fantastic views of Jupiter and Saturn's polar auroral emissions. By contrast, the dimmer NUV and visible auroral emissions cannot compete with the solar light and can only be observed on the night side hemisphere of Jupiter and Saturn; out of visibility from Earth orbit. This region is accessible to in situ spacecraft, like Galileo, Cassini or NewHorizons, which have to share their precious observing time among several different scientific topics. As a result, images of the NUV and visible auroral emissions are rare, in comparison with the huge HST database. Nevertheless, the fact that they are only captured in the night side implies that the origin of the energetic particles that gave rise to them is principally found in the immense magnetospheric tail; a vast region where energetic electromagnetic processes and plasma motions are still poorly documented. This makes these emissions invaluable in terms of scientific return. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (2 ULiège)
See detailUV emissions of Jupiter: exploration of the high-latitude regions through the UV spectrograph on NASA's Juno mission
Hue, Vincent; Gladstone, G. Randall; Versteeg, Maarten et al

Conference (2016, October)

The Juno mission offers the opportunity to study Jupiter, from its inner structure to its magnetospheric environment. Juno was launched on August 2011 and its Jupiter orbit insertion (JOI) planned for ... [more ▼]

The Juno mission offers the opportunity to study Jupiter, from its inner structure to its magnetospheric environment. Juno was launched on August 2011 and its Jupiter orbit insertion (JOI) planned for July 4th 2016, will place Juno in a 53.5 days capture orbit. A period reduction maneuver will be performed two orbits later to place Juno into 14-days elliptical orbits for the duration of the nominal mission, which includes 36 orbits. Juno-UVS is a UV spectrograph with a bandpass of 70 ≤ λ ≤ 205 nm, designed to characterize Jupiter UV emissions. One of the main additions of UVS compared to its predecessors is a 2.54 mm tantalum shielding, to protect it from the harsh radiation environment at Jupiter, and a scan mirror, to allow for targeting specific auroral regions during perijove passes. The scan mirror is located at the front end of the instrument and will be used to look at +/- 30° perpendicular to the Juno spin plane. The entrance slit of UVS has a dog-bone shape composed by three sections with field of views of 0.2°x2.5°, 0.025°x2.0° and 0.2°x2.5°, as projected onto the sky. It will provide new constraints on Jupiter’s auroral nightside morphology and spectral features as well as the vertical structure of these emissions. It will bring remote-sensing constraints for the onboard waves and particle instruments (JADE, JEDI, Waves and MAG). The ability to change the pointing will allow relating the observed UV brightness of the regions magnetically connected to where Juno flies with the particles and waves measurements. We will discuss the planned observations and scientific targets for the nominal mission orbital sequence, which will consist of three UV datasets per orbit. We will present the results from the first orbit. As Juno orbit evolves during the mission, we will also present how these objectives evolve over time. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (3 ULiège)
See detailThe UV footprint emission of Io: morphology, brightness and control by Io
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege; Saglam, Adem ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege et al

Conference (2005, August 01)

Emissions from the magnetic footprint of Io on Jupiter's upper atmosphere has been observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) since 1997 and more recently with the Advanced Camera for ... [more ▼]

Emissions from the magnetic footprint of Io on Jupiter's upper atmosphere has been observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) since 1997 and more recently with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board HST. The observations cover a wide range of central meridian Jovian longitudes and Io orbital positions. Most images also exhibit a long trailing tail associated with Io's wake plasma. The brightness of the footprint shows variations by over an order of magnitude and appears to be controlled by the distance from Jupiter's central meridian and the longitude of Io. Multiple footprints are also occasionally observed with varying relative brightness and mutual distance. These features apparently correspond to precipitation generated by the reflection of Alfvèn waves between Jupiter's ionosphere and the plasma torus. Observations collected in 2005 with ACS have provided high quality contrasted images that provide a direct indication of the altitude of the trailing tail and its orientation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUV Io footprint leading spot: A key feature for understanding the UV Io footprint multiplicity?
Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2008), 35(5),

The electromagnetic interaction between Io and the Jovian magnetosphere generates a UV auroral footprint in both Jovian hemispheres. Multiple spots were observed in the northern Jovian hemisphere when Io ... [more ▼]

The electromagnetic interaction between Io and the Jovian magnetosphere generates a UV auroral footprint in both Jovian hemispheres. Multiple spots were observed in the northern Jovian hemisphere when Io was in the northern part of the plasma torus and vice-versa for the South. Based on recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) measurements, we report here the discovery of a UV leading spot, i.e., a faint emission located ahead of the main spot. The leading spot emerges at System III longitudes between 0 degrees and 100 degrees in the northern hemisphere and between 130 degrees and 300 degrees in the southern hemisphere, i. e., in one hemisphere when multiple spots are observed in the other hemisphere. We propose as one potential mechanism that electron beams observed near Io are related to the generation of the leading spot and the secondary spot in the opposite hemisphere. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (13 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailUV Lines of Astrophysical Interest in Mg II
Biémont, Emile ULiege

Conference (1996)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUV protectants for Candida Oleophila (strain O), a biocontrol agent of post-harvest fruit disease
Lahlali, R.; Buonatesta, R.; Jijakli, Haissam ULiege

in Plant Pathology (2011), 60(2), 288-295

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailUV radiation effects on liquid crystal variable retarders for aerospace applications
Garcia Parejo, Pilar; Alvarez-Herrero, Alberto; Uribe-Patarroyo, Nestor et al

Conference (2012, August)

Liquid-Crystal Variable Retarders (LCVRs)1 are optical devices that provide a variable optical retardance accomplished by the application of electric fields. Traditionally, they have been used as light ... [more ▼]

Liquid-Crystal Variable Retarders (LCVRs)1 are optical devices that provide a variable optical retardance accomplished by the application of electric fields. Traditionally, they have been used as light polarization modulators for polarimetric applications in ground telescopes2, and more recently they took part in the polarisation modulation package of the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX)3, where the LCVRs were launched successfully on-board the Sunrise mission, a stratospheric balloon that was flown from Antarctica to study the solar magnetic fields. This mission was the precursor of the Solar Orbiter mission of the European Space Agency (ESA), where the liquid crystals will be used as polarisation modulators onboard a space mission for the first time in two instruments: the Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager (SO/PHI) and the Multi-Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy (METIS). Any on-board element used for aerospace applications must be able to survive the harsh environmental space conditions including UV radiation, gamma radiation, vibrational tests, thermal-vacuum... In this sense, LCVRs have been recently validated to be used under the space conditions of the Solar Orbiter mission, in the framework of the ESA project: “Validation of LCVRs for the Solar Orbiter Polarisation Modulation Package”. In this project, a set of LCVRs with different design parameters has been analyzed under the different space environmental conditions. These design parameters include the architecture of the LCVR cell, using Anti-Parallel Aligned Nematic (APAN) and Hybrid Aligned Nematic (HAN) architectures, the type of liquid crystal molecules, using different commercial nematic liquid crystal mixtures with high and low birefringence and positive and negative dielectric anisotropy, different homogeneous and homeotropic polyimide alignment layers and different glass plates. Among the space environmental components, the UV radiation needs special consideration due to the organic nature of the liquid crystal molecules and the alignment layers that consisted of rubbed polyimide layers. In this work, we present the main results of the UV radiation test campaign carried out in the LCVRs consisting of the performance of a thorough optical characterization of the LCVRs, including optical retardance and response times measurements at different voltages performed by the ellipsometry technique, and optical transmission measurements, before and after irradiating the LCVRs with UV light at different doses, in two different spectral ranges: 200 -400 nm and 160-200 nm. The main degradation effects observed in the LCVRs was a progressive reduction of the retardance range of the LCVRs which points out a decrease of the birefringence of the liquid crystal molecules or the increase of the pretilt angle due to the degradation of the polyimide layers, and an increase of the response times of the cells. Nevertheless, the changes observed do not involve the destruction of the LCVRs and they keep fulfilling the requirements for the Solar Orbiter mission becoming in a promising technology for aerospace applications. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 293 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUV Spectroscopy of DNA Duplex and Quadruplex Structures in the Gas Phase
Rosu, Frédéric ULiege; Gabelica, Valérie ULiege; De Pauw, Edwin ULiege et al

in Journal of Physical Chemistry A (2012), 116

UV absorption spectroscopy is one of the most widely used methods to monitor nucleic acid folding in solution, but the absorption readout is the weighted average contribution of all species present in ... [more ▼]

UV absorption spectroscopy is one of the most widely used methods to monitor nucleic acid folding in solution, but the absorption readout is the weighted average contribution of all species present in solution. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, is able to separate constituents of the solution based on their mass, but methods to probe the structure of each constituent are needed. Here, we explored whether gas-phase UV spectroscopy can give an indication of DNA folding in ions isolated by electrospray mass spectrometry. Model DNA single strands, duplexes, and G-quadruplexes were extracted from solution by electrospray; the anions were stored in a quadrupole ion trap and irradiated by a tunable laser to obtain the UV action spectra of each complex. We found that the duplex and quadruplex spectra are significantly different from the spectra of single strands, thereby suggesting that electronic spectroscopy can be used to probe the DNA gas-phase structure and obtain information about the intrinsic properties of high-order DNA structure. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (9 ULiège)
See detailThe UV spectrum of Phobos as measured by MAVEN/IUVS
Chaffin; Deighan; Schneider et al

Conference (2017, December)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailThe UV spectrum of the Be star HD 50138.
Hutsemekers, Damien ULiege

in Be Star Newsletter (1983), 8

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUV Study of the Fourth Positive Band System of CO and OI 135.6 nm From Electron Impact on CO and CO2
Ajello, J. M.; Malone, C. P.; Evans, J. S. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics (2019), 124

We have measured the 30 and 100 eV far ultraviolet (FUV) emission cross sections of the optically allowed Fourth Positive Group (4PG) band system (A 1 Π → X 1 Σ + ) of CO and the optically forbidden O (5S ... [more ▼]

We have measured the 30 and 100 eV far ultraviolet (FUV) emission cross sections of the optically allowed Fourth Positive Group (4PG) band system (A 1 Π → X 1 Σ + ) of CO and the optically forbidden O (5S  →  3P) 135.6 nm atomic transition by electron-impact-induced-fluorescence of CO and CO2 . We present a model excitation cross section from threshold to high energy for the A 1Π state, including cascade by electron impact on CO. The A 1Π state is perturbed by triplet states leading to an extended FUV glow from electron excitation of CO. We derive a model FUV spectrum of the 4PG band system from dissociative excitation of CO2 , an important process observed on Mars and Venus. Our unique experimental setup consists of a large vacuum chamber housing an electron gun system and the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph optical engineering unit, operating in the FUV (110–170 nm). The determination of the total OI ( 5S o ) at 135.6 nm emission cross section is accomplished by measuring the cylindrical glow pattern of the metastable emission from electron impact by imaging the glow intensity about the electron beam from nominally zero to ~400 mm distance from the electron beam. The study of the glow pattern of O i (135.6 nm) from dissociative excitation of CO and CO 2 indicates that the OI (5 S) state has a kinetic energy of ~1 eV by modeling the radial glow pattern with the published lifetime of 180 μs for the OI (5 S) stat. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailUV transitions of Astrophysical Interest in Ge II, As II ans Se II
Biémont, Emile ULiege; Morton, D. C.; Quinet, Pascal ULiege

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (1998), 297

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (1 ULiège)
See detailUV transitions of Astrophysical Interest in Ge II, As II ans Se II
Biémont, Emile ULiege; Morton, D. C.; Quinet, Pascal ULiege

Conference (1998, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULiège)