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See detailBrazil’s South South Cooperation with Africa : a win win Relationship ? The case of biofuel production in Mozambique
Cusson, Gabrielle ULiege

Conference (2015, April 18)

Since Lula’s presidency, South-South development cooperation (SSDC) has been at the heart of Brazil foreign policy priorities. Brazil is now recognized as an emerging actor in international development ... [more ▼]

Since Lula’s presidency, South-South development cooperation (SSDC) has been at the heart of Brazil foreign policy priorities. Brazil is now recognized as an emerging actor in international development cooperation considering its financial investments and the deployment of its many technical cooperation projects. Despite its cooperation in its own region, Brazil mobilizes a considerable amount of resources towards SSDC in Africa, and especially in Portuguese speaking countries, where it develops a “solidarity diplomacy”. Among the many technical cooperation partnerships, two fields of SSDS are considered as priorities for Brazil in Africa; agriculture and biofuels production. Being one of the world most important agricultural producer and exporter and due to the fast growing of its agribusiness industry, Brazil possess a specific expertise he wishes to share with Africa to support its agricultural revolution and to insure its food and energy security. Therefore, Mozambique has been identified as a privileged partner to develop agricultural projects, including biofuels production. Among others, ProSAVANA, a trilateral cooperation project developed in collaboration with Japan, is a very important, but controversial project. Being an emerging country, Brazil has its own strategic, political and commercial interests. Therefore, it is relevant to ask ourselves if an emerging country can deploy a selfless SSDC policy and establish a win win relationship? Is Brazil’s SSDC policy motivated by principles of solidarity or is more of a tool to consolidate its status as a global power? This papers wishes to analyses the real motivations behind Brazil’s SSDC towards Africa. [less ▲]

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See detailBrazil-EU Relations: Strategic Partner or Competitors?
Santander, Sébastian ULiege

Conference (2015, September 07)

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See detailBrazilandia. Over Brazil van John Updike.
Vanden Berghe, Kristine ULiege

in Yang : Tijdschrift voor Literatuur en Kommunikatie (1995), 31(1), 112-114

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See detailBRCA1 germline mutation and glioblastoma development: report of cases
Boukerroucha, Meriem ULiege; Josse, Claire ULiege; SEGERS, Karin ULiege et al

in BMC Cancer (2015), 15

Background Germline mutations in breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers. However, no association between BRCA1 germline mutation and glioblastoma ... [more ▼]

Background Germline mutations in breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers. However, no association between BRCA1 germline mutation and glioblastoma malignancy has ever been highlighted. Here we report two cases of BRCA1 mutated patients who developed a glioblastoma (GBM). Cases presentation Two patients diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) were screened for BRCA1 germline mutation. They both carried a pathogenic mutation introducing a premature STOP codon in the exon 11 of the BRCA1 gene. Few years later, both patients developed a glioblastoma and a second breast cancer. In an attempt to clarify the role played by a mutated BRCA1 allele in the GBM development, we investigated the BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression in breast and glioblastoma tumours for both patients. The promoter methylation status of this gene was also tested by methylation specific PCR as BRCA1 expression is also known to be lost by this mechanism in some sporadic breast cancers. Conclusion Our data show that BRCA1 expression is maintained in glioblastoma at the protein and the mRNA levels, suggesting that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) did not occur in these cases. The protein expression is tenfold higher in the glioblastoma of patient 1 than in her first breast carcinoma, and twice higher in patient 2. In agreement with the high protein expression level in the GBM, BRCA1 promoter methylation was not observed in these tumours. In these two cases, despite of a BRCA1 pathogenic germline mutation, the tumour-suppressor protein expression is maintained in GBM, suggesting that the BRCA1 mutation is not instrumental for the GBM development. [less ▲]

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See detailBRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CDKN2A germline mutations in patients with breast cancer and cutaneous melanoma
Monnerat, C.; Chompret, A.; Kannengiesser, C. et al

in Familial Cancer (2007), 6(4), 453-461

Purpose From epidemiological studies it appears that breast cancer (BC) and cutaneous melanoma (CMM) in the same individual occur at a higher frequency than expected by chance. Genetic factors common to ... [more ▼]

Purpose From epidemiological studies it appears that breast cancer (BC) and cutaneous melanoma (CMM) in the same individual occur at a higher frequency than expected by chance. Genetic factors common to both cancers can be suspected. Our goal was to estimate the involvement of "high risk" genes in patients presenting these two neoplasia, selected irrespectively from family history and age at diagnosis. Experimental Design Eighty two patients with BC and CMM were screened for BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, CDKN2A and CDK4 (exon 2) germline mutations. Results Deleterious mutations were identified in 6 patients: two carriers of a BRCA1 germline mutation, two carriers of TP53 germline mutations (one of which also harbored a BRCA2 deleterious mutation, the other one a BRCA2 unclassified variant), and two carriers of a CDKN2A germline mutation. In addition, 6 variants of unknown signification were identified in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Regarding family history, 3/13 (23%) patients with a positive family history of BC or CMM were carriers of a germline mutation, whereas only 3/69 (4%) patients without family history were carriers of a germline mutation. Conclusion Our findings show that few patients with BC and CMM who lacked family histories of these cancers are carriers of deleterious germline mutations in four of the five genes we examined. We describe for the first time, two simultaneous BRCA2 and TP53 mutations, suggesting that analysis in more than one gene could be performed if a patient's personal or familial history does not match a single syndrome. [less ▲]

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See detailBRD complex and recent advances in diagnosis and therapies
Lekeux, Pierre ULiege

in Dutch Bovine Conference (2009)

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See detailBRDC and the modulation of lung inflammation.
Lekeux, Pierre ULiege

in Veterinary Journal (2006), 171(1), 14-5

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See detailA Breadboard Holographic Interferometer with Photorefractive Crystals and Industrial Applications
Georges, Marc ULiege; Lemaire, Philippe

in SPIE's International Technical Working Group Newsletter : Holography (1998), 9(1), 9

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See detailBreadboard leakage test bench design and construction
Dardenne, Laurent; Hendrick, Patrick; Ngendakumana, Philippe ULiege

Report (2007)

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See detailThe break-up of periodic comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3: image documents from La Silla telescopes.
Boehnhardt, H.; Kaeufl, H. U.; Goudfrooij, P. et al

in The Messenger (1996), 84

The splitting of SW3 in 1995 was an other example of how brittle cometary nuclei are. Unlike in most previous events, however, the break-up of SW3 is well documented by high-quality ground-based ... [more ▼]

The splitting of SW3 in 1995 was an other example of how brittle cometary nuclei are. Unlike in most previous events, however, the break-up of SW3 is well documented by high-quality ground-based observations. SW3 represents an excellent candidate for a comprehensive analysis of cometary fragmentation, which could lead to a better understanding of the the disintegration processes involved in the evolution of comets. [less ▲]

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See detailThe breakdown bahavior of the TCLUST procedure
Ruwet, Christel ULiege; García-Escudero, Luis Angel; Gordaliza, Alfonso et al

Conference (2011, May 18)

The TCLUST procedure is a new robust clustering method introduced by García-Escudero et al. (2008). It performs clustering with the aim of finding clusters with different scatters and weights. As the ... [more ▼]

The TCLUST procedure is a new robust clustering method introduced by García-Escudero et al. (2008). It performs clustering with the aim of finding clusters with different scatters and weights. As the corresponding objective function can be unbounded, a restriction is added on the eigenvalues-ratio of the scatter matrices. The robustness of the method is guaranteed by allowing the trimming of a given proportion of observations. This trimming level has to be chosen by the practitioner, as well as the number of clusters. Suitable values for these parameters can be obtained throughout the careful examination of some classification trimmed likelihood curves (García-Escudero et al., 2010). The first part of this talk will consist of a brief presentation of this clustering procedure and the related R package (tclust). In the second part of the talk, the robustness of the TCLUST procedure, and more precisely its breakdown behavior, will be studied. In the context of cluster analysis, Hennig (2004, 2008) has defined some useful concepts to characterize the breakdown of a procedure; the r-components breakdown point, the dissolution point and the isolation robustness. These tools will be applied to the TCLUST procedure and some examples will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailThe breakdown behavior of the maximum likelihood estimator in the logistic regression model
Croux, C.; Flandre, C.; Haesbroeck, Gentiane ULiege

in Statistics & Probability Letters (2002), 60(4), 377-386

In this note we discuss the breakdown behavior of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimator in the logistic regression model. We formally prove that the ML-estimator never explodes to infinity, but rather ... [more ▼]

In this note we discuss the breakdown behavior of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimator in the logistic regression model. We formally prove that the ML-estimator never explodes to infinity, but rather breaks down to zero when adding severe outliers to a data set. An example confirms this behavior. (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailBreakdown of Anderson localization in the transport of Bose-Einstein condensates through one-dimensional disordered potentials
Dujardin, Julien ULiege; Engl, Thomas; Schlagheck, Peter ULiege

in Physical Review A (2016), 93

We study the transport of an interacting Bose–Einstein condensate through a 1D correlated disorder potential. We use for this purpose the truncated Wigner method, which is, as we show, corresponding to ... [more ▼]

We study the transport of an interacting Bose–Einstein condensate through a 1D correlated disorder potential. We use for this purpose the truncated Wigner method, which is, as we show, corresponding to the diagonal approximation of a semiclassical van Vleck–Gutzwiller representation of this many-body transport process. We also argue that semiclassical corrections beyond this diagonal approximation are vanishing under disorder average, thus confirming the validity of the truncated Wigner method in this context. Numerical calculations show that, while for weak atom-atom interaction strengths Anderson localization is preserved with a slight modification of the localization length, for larger interaction strengths a crossover to a delocalized regime exists due to inelastic scattering. In this case, the transport is fully incoherent. [less ▲]

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See detailBreakdown of the stereospecificity of DD-peptidases and beta-lactamases with thiolester substrates.
Damblon, Christian ULiege; Zhao, G. H.; Jamin, M. et al

in Biochemical Journal (1995), 309 ( Pt 2)

With peptide analogues of their natural substrates (the glycopeptide units of nascent peptidoglycan), the DD-peptidases exhibit a strict preference for D-Ala-D-Xaa C-termini. Gly is tolerated as the C ... [more ▼]

With peptide analogues of their natural substrates (the glycopeptide units of nascent peptidoglycan), the DD-peptidases exhibit a strict preference for D-Ala-D-Xaa C-termini. Gly is tolerated as the C-terminal residue, but with a significantly decreased activity. These enzymes were also known to hydrolyse various ester and thiolester analogues of their natural substrates. Some thiolesters with a C-terminal leaving group that exhibited L stereochemistry were significantly hydrolysed by some of the enzymes, particularly the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase, but the strict specificity for a D residue in the penultimate position was fully retained. These esters and thiolesters also behave as substrates for beta-lactamases. In this case, thiolesters exhibiting L stereochemistry in the ultimate position could also be hydrolysed, mainly by the class-C and class-D enzymes. However, more surprisingly, the class-C Enterobacter cloacae P99 beta-lactamase also hydrolysed thiolesters containing an L residue in the penultimate position, sometimes with a higher efficiency than the D isomer. [less ▲]

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See detailBreakdown of within- and between-network resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity during propofol-induced loss of consciousness.
Boveroux, Pierre ULiege; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULiege; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULiege et al

in Anesthesiology (2010), 113(5), 1038-53

BACKGROUND: Mechanisms of anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness remain poorly understood. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging allows investigating whole-brain connectivity changes ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Mechanisms of anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness remain poorly understood. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging allows investigating whole-brain connectivity changes during pharmacological modulation of the level of consciousness. METHODS: Low-frequency spontaneous blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations were measured in 19 healthy volunteers during wakefulness, mild sedation, deep sedation with clinical unconsciousness, and subsequent recovery of consciousness. RESULTS: Propofol-induced decrease in consciousness linearly correlates with decreased corticocortical and thalamocortical connectivity in frontoparietal networks (i.e., default- and executive-control networks). Furthermore, during propofol-induced unconsciousness, a negative correlation was identified between thalamic and cortical activity in these networks. Finally, negative correlations between default network and lateral frontoparietal cortices activity, present during wakefulness, decreased proportionally to propofol-induced loss of consciousness. In contrast, connectivity was globally preserved in low-level sensory cortices, (i.e., in auditory and visual networks across sedation stages). This was paired with preserved thalamocortical connectivity in these networks. Rather, waning of consciousness was associated with a loss of cross-modal interactions between visual and auditory networks. CONCLUSIONS: Our results shed light on the functional significance of spontaneous brain activity fluctuations observed in functional magnetic resonance imaging. They suggest that propofol-induced unconsciousness could be linked to a breakdown of cerebral temporal architecture that modifies both within- and between-network connectivity and thus prevents communication between low-level sensory and higher-order frontoparietal cortices, thought to be necessary for perception of external stimuli. They emphasize the importance of thalamocortical connectivity in higher-order cognitive brain networks in the genesis of conscious perception. [less ▲]

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See detailBreakdown points of the TCLUST procedure
Ruwet, Christel ULiege

Scientific conference (2011, September 22)

The TCLUST procedure is a new robust clustering method introduced by García-Escudero et al. (2008). It performs clustering with the aim of finding clusters with different scatters and weights. As the ... [more ▼]

The TCLUST procedure is a new robust clustering method introduced by García-Escudero et al. (2008). It performs clustering with the aim of finding clusters with different scatters and weights. As the corresponding objective function can be unbounded, a restriction is added on the eigenvalues-ratio of the scatter matrices. The robustness of the method is guaranteed by allowing the trimming of a given proportion of observations. This trimming level has to be chosen by the practitioner, as well as the number of clusters. Suitable values for these parameters can be obtained throughout the careful examination of some classification trimmed likelihood curves (García-Escudero et al., 2010). The first part of this talk will consist of a brief presentation of this clustering procedure and the related R package (tclust). In the second part of the talk, the robustness of the TCLUST procedure, and more precisely its breakdown behavior, will be studied. We will see that the estimator of the scatter matrices can resist to more outliers than the number of trimmed observations. However, the brekdown point of estimator of the centers is very poor. Two observations are sufficient to make the centers break down. This is due to the stringency of the classical breakdown point; the estimator has to have a good behavior even on samples which can hardly be clustered. For this reason, Gallegos and Ritter (2005) introduced the restricted breakdown point. The idea is to restrict the analysis to the class of “well-separated” data sets. On this class, the estimator of the centers has a breakdown point of α, the level of trimming. [less ▲]

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See detailBreaking Arches with Vibrations: The Role of Defects
Lozano, Celia; Lumay, Geoffroy ULiege; Zuriguel, Iker et al

in Physical Review Letters (2012)

We present experimental and numerical results regarding the stability of arches against external vibrations. Two-dimensional strings of mutually stabilizing grains are geometrically analyzed and ... [more ▼]

We present experimental and numerical results regarding the stability of arches against external vibrations. Two-dimensional strings of mutually stabilizing grains are geometrically analyzed and subsequently submitted to a periodic forcing at fixed frequency and increasing amplitude. The main factor that determines the granular arch resistance against vibrations is the maximum angle among those formed between any particle of the arch and its two neighbors: the higher the maximum angle is, the easier it is to break the arch. On the basis of an analysis of the forces, a simple explanation is given for this dependence. From this, interesting information can be extracted about the expected magnitudes of normal forces and friction coefficients of the particles composing the arches. [less ▲]

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See detailBreaking Bad News: the TAKE five program
VAN CAUWENBERGE, Isabelle ULiege; GILLET, Aline ULiege; Bragard, Isabelle ULiege et al

Conference (2017, January 14)

Introduction For years, bad news delivery’s impact on patients or their relatives, as well as physicians’ stress has been a major concern. Based on studies claiming the efficacy of training courses to ... [more ▼]

Introduction For years, bad news delivery’s impact on patients or their relatives, as well as physicians’ stress has been a major concern. Based on studies claiming the efficacy of training courses to help physicians delivering such news, many protocols, like SPIKES, BREAKS or SHARE, have emerged worldwide. However, training to such protocol might be time-consuming and not suitable with junior doctors or trainees’ turnover. We hypothesised that a standardized 5-hours training program could improve bad news delivery practice. Participants and methods This preliminary study was conducted in the ED of a tertiary care academic hospital accounting for 90000 ED census per year, 16 attending physicians, 10 junior residents, and 5 trainees per month. Data were collected between November 2015 and April 2016. The study included 3 phases over 4 weeks. Video recorded single role-playing sessions happened the 1st (T1) and the 4th (T3) weeks. A 3-hour theory lesson happened the second week (T2), introducing the basics of therapeutic communication and delivering bad news. Each role-playing session lasted almost 1 hour (10 minutes briefing and medical case reading, 10 minutes role-plays and 40 minutes group debriefing). Bad news delivery performance was evaluated by a 14-points retrospective assessment tool (1). We collected data about the status and impact of a stressful event at 3-days using the French version of the IES-R scale (2). We applied Student t-tests for statistical analysis. Results 14 volunteers (10 trainees and 4 junior emergency physicians) were included in the study. On average, bad-news delivery process took 9’45’’ at T1 and 10’20’’ at T3. From T1 to T3, bad-news delivery performance increased significantly for both junior emergency physicians and trainees (p=0.0003 and p=0.0006, respectively). Further analysis revealed that most relevant increases involved the “situation” (p<0.001), “presentation” (p=0.009), “knowledge” (p=0.037), “emotions” (p=0.01) and “summary” (p=0.001) steps. We also found a significant decrease of the impact of bad-news delivery on trainee physicians’ stress (p=0.006). Discussion and conclusion These preliminary results indicate some potential for this new standardized course of bad news delivery. Apart from allowing physicians increase their communications skills, we believe that this simple 5-hour simulation-training program could alleviate physicians’ stress when they happen to break bad news. References 1. Brunet, A. et al. (2003). Validation of a French version of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised. Can J Psychiatry, 48(1), 56-61. 2. Park, I. et al. (2010). Breaking bad news education for emergency medicine residents: A novel training module using simulation with the SPIKES protocol. J Emerg Trauma Shock, 3(4), 385-388. [less ▲]

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