References of "Plant Physiology"
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See detailMitochondria affects photosynthetic electron transport and photo-sensitivity in a green alga
Larosa, Véronique ULiege; Meneghesso, Andrea; La Rocca, Nicoletta et al

in Plant Physiology (2017)

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See detailPhotosynthetic trichomes contain a specific Rubisco with a modified pH9 dependent activity
Laterre, Raphaëlle; Pottier, Mathieu; Remacle, Claire ULiege et al

in Plant Physiology (2017)

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See detailWinter memory throughout the plant kingdom: different paths to flowering
Bouché, Frédéric ULiege; Woods, D.P.; Amasino, R.M.

in Plant Physiology (2017), 173(1), 27-35

Plants have evolved a variety of mechanisms to synchronize flowering with their environment to optimize reproductive success. Many species flower in spring when the photoperiod increases and the ambient ... [more ▼]

Plants have evolved a variety of mechanisms to synchronize flowering with their environment to optimize reproductive success. Many species flower in spring when the photoperiod increases and the ambient temperatures become warmer. Winter annuals and biennials have evolved repression mechanisms that prevent the transition to reproductive development in the fall. These repressive processes can be overcome by the prolonged cold of winter through a process known as vernalization. The memory of the past winter is sometimes stored by epigenetic chromatin remodeling processes that provide competence to flower, and plants usually require additional inductive signals to flower in spring. The requirement for vernalization is widespread within groups of plants adapted to temperate climates; however, the genetic and biochemical frameworks controlling the response are distinct in different groups of plants, suggesting independent evolutionary origins. Here, we compare and contrast the vernalization pathways in different families of plants. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic Architecture of Flowering-Time Variation in Brachypodium distachyon
Woods, D.P.; Bednarek, R.; Bouché, Frédéric ULiege et al

in Plant Physiology (2017), 173(1), 269-279

The transition to reproductive development is a crucial step in the plant life cycle, and the timing of this transition is an important factor in crop yields. Here, we report new insights into the genetic ... [more ▼]

The transition to reproductive development is a crucial step in the plant life cycle, and the timing of this transition is an important factor in crop yields. Here, we report new insights into the genetic control of natural variation in flowering time in Brachypodium distachyon, a nondomesticated pooid grass closely related to cereals such as wheat (Triticum spp.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). A recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between the rapid-flowering accession Bd21 and the delayed-flowering accession Bd1-1 were grown in a variety of environmental conditions to enable exploration of the genetic architecture of flowering time. A genotyping-by-sequencing approach was used to develop SNP markers for genetic map construction, and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control differences in flowering time were identified. Many of the flowering-time QTLs are detected across a range of photoperiod and vernalization conditions, suggesting that the genetic control of flowering within this population is robust. The two major QTLs identified in undomesticated B. distachyon colocalize with VERNALIZATION1/PHYTOCHROME C and VERNALIZATION2, loci identified as flowering regulators in the domesticated crops wheat and barley. This suggests that variation in flowering time is controlled in part by a set of genes broadly conserved within pooid grasses. [less ▲]

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See detailPhotosynthetic Trichomes Contain a Specific Rubisco with a Modified pH-Dependent Activity.
Laterre, Raphaelle; Pottier, Mathieu ULiege; Remacle, Claire ULiege et al

in Plant Physiology (2017), 173(4), 2110-2120

Ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is the most abundant enzyme in plants and is responsible for CO2 fixation during photosynthesis. This enzyme is assembled from eight large subunits ... [more ▼]

Ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is the most abundant enzyme in plants and is responsible for CO2 fixation during photosynthesis. This enzyme is assembled from eight large subunits (RbcL) encoded by a single chloroplast gene and eight small subunits (RbcS) encoded by a nuclear gene family. Rubisco is primarily found in the chloroplasts of mesophyll (C3 plants), bundle-sheath (C4 plants), and guard cells. In certain species, photosynthesis also takes place in the secretory cells of glandular trichomes, which are epidermal outgrowths (hairs) involved in the secretion of specialized metabolites. However, photosynthesis and, in particular, Rubisco have not been characterized in trichomes. Here, we show that tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) trichomes contain a specific Rubisco small subunit, NtRbcS-T, which belongs to an uncharacterized phylogenetic cluster (T). This cluster contains RbcS from at least 33 species, including monocots, many of which are known to possess glandular trichomes. Cluster T is distinct from the cluster M, which includes the abundant, functionally characterized RbcS isoforms expressed in mesophyll or bundle-sheath cells. Expression of NtRbcS-T in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and purification of the full Rubisco complex showed that this isoform conferred higher Vmax and Km values as well as higher acidic pH-dependent activity than NtRbcS-M, an isoform expressed in the mesophyll. This observation was confirmed with trichome extracts. These data show that an ancient divergence allowed for the emergence of a so-far-uncharacterized RbcS cluster. We propose that secretory trichomes have a particular Rubisco uniquely adapted to secretory cells where CO2 is released by the active specialized metabolism. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysiological characterization of a plant mitochondrial Calcium uniporter in Vitro and in Vivo
Teardo, E.; Carraretto, L.; Wagner, S. et al

in Plant Physiology (2017), 173(2), 1355-1370

Over the recent years, several proteins that make up the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex (MCUC) mediating Ca2+ uptake into the mitochondrial matrix have been identified in mammals, including the ... [more ▼]

Over the recent years, several proteins that make up the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex (MCUC) mediating Ca2+ uptake into the mitochondrial matrix have been identified in mammals, including the channel-forming protein MCU. Although six MCU gene homologs are conserved in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in which mitochondria can accumulate Ca2+, a functional characterization of plant MCU homologs has been lacking. Using electrophysiology, we show that one isoform, AtMCU1, gives rise to a Ca2+-permeable channel activity that can be observed even in the absence of accessory proteins implicated in the formation of the active mammalian channel. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence that AtMCU1 activity is sensitive to the mitochondrial calcium uniporter inhibitors Ruthenium Red and Gd3+, as well as to the Arabidopsis protein MICU, a regulatory MCUC component. AtMCU1 is prevalently expressed in roots, localizes to mitochondria, and its absence causes mild changes in Ca2+ dynamics as assessed by in vivo measurements in Arabidopsis root tips. Plants either lacking or overexpressing AtMCU1 display root mitochondria with altered ultrastructure and show shorter primary roots under restrictive growth conditions. In summary, our work adds evolutionary depth to the investigation of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport, indicates that AtMCU1, together with MICU as a regulator, represents a functional configuration of the plant mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake complex with differences to the mammalian MCUC, and identifies a new player of the intracellular Ca2+ regulation network in plants. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon Supply and Photoacclimation Cross Talk in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.
Polukhina, I; Fristedt, R; Dinc, E et al

in Plant Physiology (2016), 172(3), 1494-1505

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See detailDynamic Distribution and Interaction of the Arabidopsis SRSF1 Subfamily Splicing Factors
Stankovic, Nancy ULiege; Schloesser, Marie ULiege; Joris, Marine ULiege et al

in Plant Physiology (2016), 170

Serine/Arginine-rich (SR) proteins are essential nucleus-localized splicing factors. Our prior studies showed that Arabidopsis RSZ22, a homolog of the human SRSF7 SR factor, exits the nucleus through two ... [more ▼]

Serine/Arginine-rich (SR) proteins are essential nucleus-localized splicing factors. Our prior studies showed that Arabidopsis RSZ22, a homolog of the human SRSF7 SR factor, exits the nucleus through two pathways, either dependent or independent on the XPO1 receptor. Here, we examined the expression profiles and shuttling dynamics of the Arabidopsis SRSF1 subfamily (SR30, SR34, SR34a and SR34b) under control of their endogenous promoter in Arabidopsis and in transient expression assay. Due to its rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and high expression level in transient assay, we analysed the multiple determinants that regulate the localisation and shuttling dynamics of SR34. By site-directed mutagenesis of SR34 RNA-binding sequences and RS domain, we further show that functional RRM1 or RRM2 are dispensable for the exclusive protein nuclear localization and speckle-like distribution. However, mutations of both RRMs induced aggregation of the protein whereas mutation in the RS domain decreased the stability of the protein and suppressed its nuclear accumulation. Furthermore, the RNA-binding motif mutants are defective for their export through the XPO1 (CRM1/Exportin-1) receptor pathway, but retain nucleocytoplasmic mobility. We performed a yeast two hybrid screen with SR34 as bait and discovered SR45 as a new interactor. SR45 is an unusual SR splicing factor bearing two RS domains. These interactions were confirmed in planta by FLIM-FRET and BiFC and the roles of SR34 domains in protein-protein interactions were further studied. Altogether, our report extends our understanding of shuttling dynamics of Arabidopsis SR splicing factors [less ▲]

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See detailRe-visiting plant plasma membrane lipids in tobacco: a focus on sphingolipids
Cacas, Jean Luc; Buré, Corinne; Grosjean, Kevin et al

in Plant Physiology (2016), 170

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See detailSinglet Oxygen-Induced Cell Death in Arabidopsis under High-Light Stress Is Controlled by OXI1 Kinase.
Shumbe, Léonard ULiege; Chevalier, Anne; Legeret, Bertrand et al

in Plant Physiology (2016), 170(3), 1757-71

Studies of the singlet oxygen ((1)O2)-overproducing flu and chlorina1 (ch1) mutants of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have shown that (1)O2-induced changes in gene expression can lead to either ... [more ▼]

Studies of the singlet oxygen ((1)O2)-overproducing flu and chlorina1 (ch1) mutants of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have shown that (1)O2-induced changes in gene expression can lead to either programmed cell death (PCD) or acclimation. A transcriptomic analysis of the ch1 mutant has allowed the identification of genes whose expression is specifically affected by each phenomenon. One such gene is OXIDATIVE SIGNAL INDUCIBLE1 (OXI1) encoding an AGC kinase that was noticeably induced by excess light energy and (1)O2 stress conditions leading to cell death. Photo-induced oxidative damage and cell death were drastically reduced in the OXI1 null mutant (oxi1) and in the double mutant ch1*oxi1 compared with the wild type and the ch1 single mutant, respectively. This occurred without any changes in the production rate of (1)O2 but was cancelled by exogenous applications of the phytohormone jasmonate. OXI1-mediated (1)O2 signaling appeared to operate through a different pathway from the previously characterized OXI1-dependent response to pathogens and H2O2 and was found to be independent of the EXECUTER proteins. In high-light-stressed plants, the oxi1 mutation was associated with reduced jasmonate levels and with the up-regulation of genes encoding negative regulators of jasmonate signaling and PCD. Our results show that OXI1 is a new regulator of (1)O2-induced PCD, likely acting upstream of jasmonate. [less ▲]

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See detailRoot System Markup Language: toward an unified root architecture description language
Lobet, Guillaume ULiege; Pound, Michael; Diener, Julien et al

in Plant Physiology (2015)

The number of image analysis tools supporting the extraction of architectural features of root systems has increased over the last years. These tools offer a handy set of complementary facilities, yet it ... [more ▼]

The number of image analysis tools supporting the extraction of architectural features of root systems has increased over the last years. These tools offer a handy set of complementary facilities, yet it is widely accepted that none of these software tool is able to extract in an efficient way growing array of static and dynamic features for different types of images and species. . We describe the Root System Markup Language (RSML) that has been designed to overcome two major challenges: (i) to enable portability of root architecture data between different software tools in an easy and interoperable manner allowing seamless collaborative work, and (ii) to provide a standard format upon which to base central repositories which will soon arise following the expanding worldwide root phenotyping effort. RSML follows the XML standard to store 2D or 3D image metadata, plant and root properties and geometries, continuous functions along individual root paths and a suite of annotations at the image, plant or root scales, at one or several time points. Plant ontologies are used to describe botanical entities that are relevant at the scale of root system architecture. An xml-schema describes the features and constraints of RSML and open-source packages have been developed in several languages (R, Excel, Java, Python, C#) to enable researchers to integrate RSML files into popular research workflow. [less ▲]

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See detailInduction of Photosynthetic Carbon Fixation in Anoxia Relies on Hydrogenase Activity and Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.
Godaux, Damien ULiege; Bailleul, Benjamin ULiege; Berne, Nicolas ULiege et al

in Plant Physiology (2015), 168(2), 648-58

The model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is frequently subject to periods of dark and anoxia in its natural environment. Here, by resorting to mutants defective in the maturation of the ... [more ▼]

The model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is frequently subject to periods of dark and anoxia in its natural environment. Here, by resorting to mutants defective in the maturation of the chloroplastic oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases or in Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1 (PGRL1)-dependent cyclic electron flow around photosystem I (PSI-CEF), we demonstrate the sequential contribution of these alternative electron flows (AEFs) in the reactivation of photosynthetic carbon fixation during a shift from dark anoxia to light. At light onset, hydrogenase activity sustains a linear electron flow from photosystem II, which is followed by a transient PSI-CEF in the wild type. By promoting ATP synthesis without net generation of photosynthetic reductants, the two AEF are critical for restoration of the capacity for carbon dioxide fixation in the light. Our data also suggest that the decrease in hydrogen evolution with time of illumination might be due to competition for reduced ferredoxins between ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase and hydrogenases, rather than due to the sensitivity of hydrogenase activity to oxygen. Finally, the absence of the two alternative pathways in a double mutant pgrl1 hydrogenase maturation factor G-2 is detrimental for photosynthesis and growth and cannot be compensated by any other AEF or anoxic metabolic responses. This highlights the role of hydrogenase activity and PSI-CEF in the ecological success of microalgae in low-oxygen environments. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant Water Uptake in Drying Soils
Lobet, Guillaume ULiege; Couvreur, Valentin; Meunier, Félicien et al

in Plant Physiology (2014), in press

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See detailRoot Systems Biology: bridging regulatory networks to rhizosphere-scale processes
Hill, Kristine; Porco, Silvana; Lobet, Guillaume ULiege et al

in Plant Physiology (2013)

Our understanding of root biology has advanced over the last decade, in large part due to genetic and genomic approaches in model organisms. Recently, researchers have started to study the mechanisms ... [more ▼]

Our understanding of root biology has advanced over the last decade, in large part due to genetic and genomic approaches in model organisms. Recently, researchers have started to study the mechanisms controlling root growth and development using systems biology approaches. Modeling is set to become much more important as our knowledge of root regulatory pathways becomes increasingly complex and their outputs less intuitive. In order to relate root genotype to phenotype we must move beyond the network scales and employ multiscale modeling approaches to predict emergent properties at the tissue, organ, organism and rhizosphere levels. The interplay between scales is complex and an integrative approach is essential to understand the underlying biological mechanisms. We describe examples where such approaches have been successful and conclude by discussing the merits of developing digital plant models able to span the network to population scales and interact with their environment. [less ▲]

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See detailPlasma membrane localization of StREM1.3 Remorin is mediated by conformational changes in a novel C-terminal anchor and required for the restriction of PVX movement.
Perraki, Artemis; Cacas, Jean-Luc; Crowet, Jean-Marc ULiege et al

in Plant Physiology (2012), 160(1),

The formation of plasma membrane (PM) micro-domains plays a crucial role in the regulation of membrane signalling and trafficking. Remorins are a plant-specific family of proteins organized in six ... [more ▼]

The formation of plasma membrane (PM) micro-domains plays a crucial role in the regulation of membrane signalling and trafficking. Remorins are a plant-specific family of proteins organized in six phylogenetic groups, and Remorins of the group 1 are among the few plant proteins known to specifically associate with membrane rafts. As such, they are valuable to understand the molecular bases for PM lateral organization in plants. However, little is known about the structural determinants underlying group 1 Remorins specific association with membrane rafts. We used a structure-function approach to identify a short C-terminal anchor (RemCA) indispensable and sufficient for tight direct binding of Solanum tuberosum REMORIN 1.3 (StREM1.3) to the PM. RemCA switches from unordered to an alpha-helical structure in a non-polar environment. Protein structure modelling indicates that RemCA folds into a tight hairpin of amphipathic helices. Consistently, mutations reducing RemCA amphipathy abolished StREM1.3 PM localization. Furthermore, RemCA directly binds to biological membranes in vitro, shows higher affinity for Detergent-Insoluble Membranes (DIM) lipids, and targets YFP to DIMs in vivo. Mutations in RemCA resulting in cytoplasmic StREM1.3 localization abolish StREM1.3 function in restricting potato virus X movement. The mechanisms described here provide new insights on the control and function of lateral segregation of plant PM. [less ▲]

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See detailA Single Ancient Origin for Prototypical Serine/Arginine-Rich Splicing Factors1[W][OA]
Califice, Sophie; Baurain, Denis ULiege; Hanikenne, Marc ULiege et al

in Plant Physiology (2012), 158(2), 546-560

Eukaryotic pre-mRNA splicing is a process involving a very complex RNA-protein edifice. Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins play essential roles in pre-mRNA constitutive and alternative splicing, and have ... [more ▼]

Eukaryotic pre-mRNA splicing is a process involving a very complex RNA-protein edifice. Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins play essential roles in pre-mRNA constitutive and alternative splicing, and have been suggested to be crucial in plant-specific forms of developmental regulation and environmental adaptation. Despite their functional importance, little is known about their origin and evolutionary history. SR splicing factors have a modular organization featuring at least one RRM domain and a C-terminal region enriched in Ser/Arg dipeptides. To investigate the evolution of SR proteins, we infer phylogenies for >12,000 RRM domains representing >200 broadly sampled organisms. Our analyses reveal that the RRM domain is not restricted to eukaryotes and that all prototypical SR proteins share a single ancient origin, including the plant-specific SR45 protein. Based on these findings, we propose a scenario for their diversification into four natural families, each corresponding to a main SR architecture, and a dozen subfamilies, of which we profile both sequence conservation and composition. Finally, using operational criteria for computational discovery and classification, we catalogue SR proteins in 20 model organisms, with a focus on green algae and land plants. Altogether, our study confirms the homogeneity and antiquity of SR splicing factors, while establishing robust phylogenetic relationships between animal and plant proteins, which should enable functional analyses of lesser characterized SR family members, especially in green plants. [less ▲]

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See detailA novel image-analysis toolbox enabling quantitative analysis of root system architecture
Lobet, Guillaume ULiege; Pagès, L.; Draye, X.

in Plant Physiology (2011), 157(1), 29--39

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See detailNon-symbiotic hemoglobin-2 leads to an elevated energy state and to a combined increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids and total oil content when over-expressed in developing seeds of transgenic Arabidopsis plants.
Vigeolas, Hélène ULiege; Huhn, D.; Geigenberger, P.

in Plant Physiology (2011)

Non-symbiotic hemoglobins are ubiquitously expressed in plants and divided into two different classes based on gene-expression pattern and oxygen binding-properties. Most of the published research has ... [more ▼]

Non-symbiotic hemoglobins are ubiquitously expressed in plants and divided into two different classes based on gene-expression pattern and oxygen binding-properties. Most of the published research has been on the function of class-1 hemoglobins. To investigate the role of class-2 hemoglobins, transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated over-expressing Arabidopsis hemoglobin-2 (AHb2) under the control of a seed-specific promoter. Over-expression of AHb2 led to a 40% increase in the total fatty acid content of developing and mature seeds in three subsequent generations. This was mainly due to an increase in the poly-unsaturated C18:2 (omega-6) linoleic and C18:3 (omega-3) alpha-linolenic acids. Moreover, AHb2 over-expression led to an increase in the C18:2/C18:1 and C18:3/C18:2 ratios as well as in the C18:3 content in mol% of total fatty acids and in the unsaturation/saturation index of total seed lipids. The increase in fatty-acid content was mainly due to a stimulation of the rate of triacylglycerol synthesis which was attributable to a 3-fold higher energy state and a 2-fold higher sucrose content of the seeds. Under low external oxygen, AHb2 over-expression maintained an up to 5-fold higher energy state and prevented fermentation. This is consistent with AHb2 over-expression results in improved oxygen availability within developing seeds. In contrast to this, over-expression of class-1 hemoglobin did not lead to any significant increase in the metabolic performance of the seeds. Results provide evidence for a specific function of class-2 hemoglobin in seed oil production and in promoting the accumulation of poly-unsaturated fatty acids by facilitating oxygen supply in developing seeds. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of an Arabidopsis SR Splicing Factor: Role of the RNA-Binding Domains
Rausin, Glwadys ULiege; Tillemans, Vinciane ULiege; Stankovic, Nancy ULiege et al

in Plant Physiology (2010), 153

Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are essential nuclear-localized splicing factors. We have investigated the dynamic subcellular distribution of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZp22 protein, a ... [more ▼]

Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are essential nuclear-localized splicing factors. We have investigated the dynamic subcellular distribution of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZp22 protein, a homolog of the human 9G8 SR factor. Little is known about the determinants underlying the control of plant SR protein dynamics, and so far most studies relied on ectopic transient overexpression. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the RSZp22 expression profile and describe its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling properties in specific cell types. Comparison of transient ectopic- and stable tissue-specific expression highlights the advantages of both approaches for nuclear protein dynamic studies. By site-directed mutagenesis of RSZp22 RNA-binding sequences, we show that functional RNA recognition motif RNP1 and zinc-knuckle are dispensable for the exclusive protein nuclear localization and speckle-like distribution. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging also revealed that these motifs are implicated in RSZp22 molecular interactions. Furthermore, the RNA-binding motif mutants are defective for their export through the CRM1/XPO1/Exportin-1 receptor pathway but retain nucleocytoplasmic mobility. Moreover, our data suggest that CRM1 is a putative export receptor for mRNPs in plants. [less ▲]

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See detailThe plastidial glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is critical for viable pollen development in Arabidopsis
Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Cascales - Miñana, Borja ULiege; Irles-Segura, Asunción et al

in Plant Physiology (2010), 152(4), 1830-1841

Plant metabolism is highly coordinated with development. However, an understanding of the whole picture of metabolism and its interactions with plant development is scarce. In this work, we show that the ... [more ▼]

Plant metabolism is highly coordinated with development. However, an understanding of the whole picture of metabolism and its interactions with plant development is scarce. In this work, we show that the deficiency in the plastidial glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) leads to male sterility in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Pollen from homozygous gapcp double mutant plants (gapcp1gapcp2) displayed shrunken and collapsed forms and were unable to germinate when cultured in vitro. The pollen alterations observed in gapcp1gapcp2 were attributed to a disorganized tapetum layer. Accordingly, the expression of several of the genes involved in tapetum development was down-regulated in gapcp1gapcp2. The fertility of gapcp1gapcp2 was rescued by transforming this mutant with a construct carrying the GAPCp1 cDNA under the control of its native promoter (pGAPCp1::GAPCp1c). However, the GAPCp1 or GAPCp2 cDNA under the control of the 35S promoter (p35S::GAPCp), which is poorly expressed in the tapetum, did not complement the mutant fertility. Mutant GAPCp isoforms deficient in the catalytic activity of the enzyme were unable to complement the sterile phenotype of gapcp1gapcp2, thus confirming that both the expression and catalytic activity of GAPCp in anthers are necessary for mature pollen development. A metabolomic study in flower buds indicated that the most important difference between the sterile (gapcp1gapcp2, gapcp1gapcp2-p35S::GAPCp) and the fertile (wild-type plants, gapcp1gapcp2-pGAPCp1::GAPCp1c) lines was the increase in the signaling molecule trehalose. This work corroborates the importance of plastidial glycolysis in plant metabolism and provides evidence for the crucial role of GAPCps in pollen development. It additionally brings new insights into the complex interactions between metabolism and development. © 2010 American Society of Plant Biologists. [less ▲]

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