References of "Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology"
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See detailUse of high-resolution seismic reflection data in the paleogeographical reconstruction of shallow Lake Yamanaka (Fuji Five Lakes, Japan)
Lamair, Laura ULiege; Hubert, Aurelia ULiege; Yamamoto, S. et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2018), 514

High-resolution seismic profiles, combined with the integration of published drilling data, provide a detailed paleoenvironmental history of Lake Yamanaka (Fuji Five Lakes, Japan). This study presents a ... [more ▼]

High-resolution seismic profiles, combined with the integration of published drilling data, provide a detailed paleoenvironmental history of Lake Yamanaka (Fuji Five Lakes, Japan). This study presents a detailed analysis of the different depositional stages of the area currently occupied by Lake Yamanaka (floodplain wetland, river and lake). From ca. 5500 cal yr BP to ca. 5050 cal yr BP, the Yamanaka basin was occupied by floodplain wetlands. During that period, the landscape was very stable and erosion on northeastern flank of Mt. Fuji was relatively limited. From ca. 5050 cal yr BP to ca. 3050 cal yr BP, the water level increased and the floodplain wetlands became a lake. From ca. 3050 cal yr BP to ca. 2050 cal yr BP, the water level progressively decreased, leading to a reduction in lake extent. During this lowering of the lake's water level, a 1 km2 mass-transport deposit modified the physiography of the lake floor. From ca. 2050 cal yr BP to ca. 1050 cal yr BP, the lake disappeared and a river flowing towards the northwest occupied the depression. Ponds occupied morphological lows formed by mass transport deposits. From ca. 1050 cal yr BP to the present day, the lake water level rose again, connecting the ponds with the main lake. Since then, the lake water level has continued to rise to the current level. Lake water level fluctuations are the results of several factors that could be interconnected: (i) changes in precipitation rates; (ii) margin destabilization (the Yamanaka mass-transport deposit), (iii) changes in river inlets and therefore variation in water supplies, (iv) volcanic eruptions (scoria fall-out and lava flows) and (v) changes in vegetation cover. This study highlights the importance of coupling sediment cores and high-resolution seismic reflection profiling to identify lateral variation and modification of sedimentary inputs through time. [less ▲]

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See detailReconstructing Cenozoic vegetation from proxy data and models – A NECLIME synthesis (Editorial)
François, Louis ULiege; Bruch, A. A.; Utescher, T. et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2017), 467

[No abstract available]

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See detailCenozoic vegetation gradients in the mid- and higher latitudes of central Eurasia and climatic implications
Popova, S.; Utescher, T.; Gromyko, D. V. et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2017), 467

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See detailMiddle Miocene climate and vegetation models and their validation with proxy data
Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULiege; Utescher, Torsten; Erdei, Boglarka et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2017), 467

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See detailQuantification of Calabrian vegetation in Southern Primory'e (far East of Russia) using multiple proxies
Bondarenko, O. V.; Blokhina, N. I.; Bruch, A. A. et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2017), 467

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See detailSedimentary records of past earthquakes in Boraboy Lake during the last ca 600 years (North Anatolian Fault, Turkey).
Avsar, Ulas; Hubert, Aurélia ULiege; De Batist, Marc et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2015), (433), 1-9

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See detailDiversity patterns of the vascular plant group Zosterophyllopsida in relation to Devonian palaeogeography
Cascales - Miñana, Borja ULiege; Meyer-Berthaud, Brigitte

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2015), 423

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See detailEnvironmental and Climatic Changes during the Pleistocene-Holocene in the Bor Plain, Central Anatolia, Turkey
Altin, T.; El Ouahabi, Meriam ULiege; Fagel, Nathalie ULiege

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2015)

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See detailEarly seed plants from Western Gondwana: Paleobiogeographical and ecological implications based on Tournaisian (Lower Carboniferous) records from Argentina
Prestianni, C.; Rustan, J.J.; Balseiro, D. et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2015), 417

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See detailThe Coexistence Approach--theoretical background and practical considerations of using plant fossils for climate quantification
Utescher, T.; Bruch, A. A.; Erdei, B. et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2014), 410

The Coexistence Approach was established by Mosbrugger and Utescher (1997) as a plant-based method to re- construct palaeoclimate by considering recent climatic distribution ranges of the nearest living ... [more ▼]

The Coexistence Approach was established by Mosbrugger and Utescher (1997) as a plant-based method to re- construct palaeoclimate by considering recent climatic distribution ranges of the nearest living relatives of each fossil taxon. During its existence for over more than 15 years, its basics have been tested and reviewed in comparison with other terrestrial and marine climate reconstruction techniques and climate modelling data. However, some controversies remain about its underlying data or its applicability in general. In view of these controversies this paper discusses the power and limitations of the Coexistence Approach by summarising past results and new developments. We give insights into the details and problems of each step of the application from the assignment of the fossil plant to the most suitable nearest living relative, the crucial consideration of the usefulness of specific taxa towards their climatic values and the correct interpretation of the software-based suggested palaeoclimatic intervals. Furthermore, we reflect on the fundamental data inte- grated in the Coexistence Approach by explaining different concepts and usages of plant distribution information and the advantages and disadvantages of modern climatic maps. Additionally, we elaborate on the importance of continually updating the information incorporated in the database due to new findings in e.g., (palaeo-)botany, meteorology and computer technology. Finally, for a transparent and appropriate use, we give certain guidelines for future applications and emphasize to users how to carefully consider and discuss their results. We show the Coexistence Approach to be an adaptive method capable of yielding palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental information through time and space. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrated bio-chemostratigraphical correlations and climatic evolution across the Danian-Selandian boundary at low latitudes
Storme, Jean-Yves ULiege; Steurbaut, Etienne; Devleeschouwer, Xavier et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2014), 414

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See detailPalaeogeographical and palaeoecological constraints on palaeozoic vertebrates (chondrichthyans and placoderms) in the Ardenne Massif - Shark radiations in the Famennian on both sides of the Paleotethys
Derycke, Claire; Olive, Sébastien ULiege; Groessens, Eric et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2014), 414

Three chondrichthyan radiations are registered in the Famennian of the ArdenneMassif (Belgium). These radiations are already observed in Morocco and in the Carnic Alps, their acme being related with the ... [more ▼]

Three chondrichthyan radiations are registered in the Famennian of the ArdenneMassif (Belgium). These radiations are already observed in Morocco and in the Carnic Alps, their acme being related with the early expansa transgression. Comparisons of univariate statistical descriptors like Margalef richness and Shannon–Wiener diversity index show variations between both margins of the Paleotethys, variations interpreted in terms of trophic relationships. The Ardenne area, a northern shallow carbonate platform is characterized during the Famennian by endemic shark taxa with durophagous dentition. The southern open deep-sea area, the Variscan Sea, contains large placoderms probably disclosing a negative feedback on “cladodont” chondrichthyans. This supports the hypothesis that the Armorica platelet behaved like a barrier between the central southern Laurussia and northern Gondwana. [less ▲]

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See detailPaleohydrological and paleoenvironmental changes recorded in terrestrial sediments of the Paleocene-Eocene boundary (Normandy, France)
Garel, S.; Schnyder, J.; Jacob, J. et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2013), 376

The Paleocene-Eocene boundary (55.8. Ma) is associated with the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), which is characterized by a negative Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE), reflecting a major ... [more ▼]

The Paleocene-Eocene boundary (55.8. Ma) is associated with the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), which is characterized by a negative Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE), reflecting a major perturbation of the carbon cycle, and by an extreme and rapid global warming. The Cap d'Ailly area (Upper Normandy, France), in which previous studies have revealed the Paleocene-Eocene transition, is a reference locality for organic-rich terrestrial and lagoonal deposits of the "Sparnacian" stage, widespread in Northwestern Europe. In this study, we focus on the organic matter content of the Vasterival section. Organic data (Rock-Eval, palynofacies, biomarker analyses and compound specific isotope analyses) were acquired in order to constrain the paleoenvironmental and paleohydrological changes that occurred at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary. Stable carbon isotope compositions of higher plant leaf wax n-alkanes reveal a CIE of - 4.5‰, extending throughout the second half of the studied section. Palynofacies observations reveal: (i) an abrupt shift from a closed, quiescent marsh pond to an open eutrophic swamp subjected to algal blooms, concomitant with the onset of the CIE; and (ii) the evolution from a swamp to a tidal flat due to the marine transgression that occurred during the PETM. Higher plant biomarkers and their hydrogen isotopic composition compared to nitrogen analyses suggest: (i) dry episodes just before the PETM that may help to understand the triggering of this hyperthermal event; and (ii) a moister climate associated with a stronger seasonality during the early PETM.© 2013 ElsevierB.V. [less ▲]

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See detailBiochemostratigraphy of the upper Frasnian in the Namur–Dinant Basin, Belgium: Implications for a global Frasnian–Famennian pre-event
Azmy, Karem; Poty, Edouard ULiege; Mottequin, Bernard ULiege

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2012), 313-314

The Upper Frasnian sequence of the Namur–Dinant Basin in southern Belgium consists of mixed siliclastic–carbonate succession of a ramp setting, where the sequence spans the rhenana–linguiformis conodont ... [more ▼]

The Upper Frasnian sequence of the Namur–Dinant Basin in southern Belgium consists of mixed siliclastic–carbonate succession of a ramp setting, where the sequence spans the rhenana–linguiformis conodont zones. Earlier studies investigated the chemostratigraphic variations during the Frasnian-Famennian event, but little has been yet known about the nature of the counterpart variations that immediately preceded that time interval. Despite the scarcity of well-preserved brachiopods, sixty–one calcitic shells were collected mainly from beds of the Neuville and Les Valisettes formations (Lower and Upper rhenana zones), to investigate biochemostratigraphic profiles of oxygen-, carbon-isotope and rare earth element (REE) variations of the time interval immediately before the Frasnian-Famennian boundary. The δ18O and δ13 C values of the well-preserved shells range from − 9.5 to − 5.6 ‰ VPDB (− 7.7 ± 1.1, n = 33) and from − 1.8 to 3.8 ‰ VPDB (1.1 ± 1.7, n = 33), respectively, which are within the documented global values. The C- and O-isotope profiles exhibit parallel shifts, particularly at the top of the Neuville Formation (top of the Lower rhenana Zone), which are associated with a sea-level rise and shrinkage in the brachiopod community. Also, the Th/U (0.9 ± 0.6, n = 16) and Ce/Ce* (2.2 ± 0.5, n = 16) ratios suggest deposition under reducing conditions consistent with sea transgression. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling Late Miocene vegetation in Europe: Results of the CARAIB model and comparison with palaeovegetation data
François, Louis ULiege; Utescher, T.; Favre, E. et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2011), 304(3-4), 359-378

The CARAIB (CARbon Assimilation In the Biosphere) model is used to study the vegetation distribution during the Late Miocene (Tortonian). In this version, the plant classification is specifically adapted ... [more ▼]

The CARAIB (CARbon Assimilation In the Biosphere) model is used to study the vegetation distribution during the Late Miocene (Tortonian). In this version, the plant classification is specifically adapted to best represent Miocene European vegetation. Compared to other plant classifications used in global models, this adapted classification is more refined, since it is specifically developed for European vegetation and it includes various thermophylous tree types, which were present in Europe during the Miocene. The corresponding climatic tolerance parameters are based on the study of Laurent et al. (Journal of Vegetation Science, 15, 739-746, 2004) for the tree types currently present in Europe and on the distribution of analogue species in southeastern Asia and North/Central America for the thermophylous (sub-tropical) trees. The same classification is used to characterize the palaeoflora at the available Late Miocene localities, allowing a model-data comparison at the plant functional type level, rather than at the biome level. The climatic inputs to CARAIB are obtained from the COSMOS atmosphere-ocean general circulation model. The climatic anomalies (Tortonian minus Present) derived from COSMOS are interpolated to a higher spatial resolution before being used in the vegetation model. These anomalies are combined with a modern climatology to produce climatic fields with high spatial resolution (10' x 10'). This procedure has the advantage of making apparent relief features smaller than the grid cells of the climate model and, hence, makes easier the comparison with local vegetation data, although it does not really improve the quality of the Tortonian climate reconstruction. The new version of CARAIB was run over Europe at this higher spatial resolution. It calculates the potential distribution of 13 different classes of trees (including cold/cool/warm-temperate, subtropical and tropical types), together with their cover fractions, net primary productivities and biomasses. The resulting model vegetation distribution reconstructed for the Tortonian is compared to available palaeovegetation and pollen data. Before performing this comparison, the tree taxa present at the various data sites are assigned to one or several model classes, depending on the identification level of the taxa. If several classes are possible for a taxon, only those that can co-exist with the other tree classes identified at the site are retained. This methodology is similar to the co-existence approach used in palaeoclimatic reconstructions based on vegetation data. It narrows the range of tree types present at the various sites, by suppressing in the data the extreme types, such as the cold boreal/temperate and tropical trees. The method allows a comparison with the model simulation on a presence/absence basis. This comparison provides an overall agreement of 53% between the model and the data, when all sites and tree types are considered. The agreement is high (>85%) for needle-leaved summergreen boreal/temperate cold trees (Larix sp.) and for tropical trees, intermediate (>40%) for other boreal/temperate cold trees and for needle-leaved evergreen temperate cool trees, broadleaved summergreen temperate cool trees and broadleaved evergreen warm-temperate trees, and poor (<40%) for most temperate perhumid warm trees. In many cases, the model is shown to be better at predicting the absence than the presence, as observed for tropical trees. The modelled distributions of cold boreal/temperate trees tend to extend too much towards the south compared to the data. B contrast, model sub-tropical trees (temperate perhumid warm and needle-leaf summergreen temperate warm trees) appear to be restricted to some limited areas in southern Europe, while they are present in the data from central Europe up to at least 50 degrees N. Consequently, modelled Late Miocene climate appears to remain too cold to produce assemblages of trees consistent with the data. The predicted modelled trends from the past to the present are in the right direction, but the amplitude remains too small. For the simulations to be in a better agreement with the data, higher CO2 levels may be necessary in the climate simulations, or possibly other oceanic boundary conditions may be required, such as different bathymetry in the Panama seaway. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon-isotope analysis of fossil wood and dispersed organic matter from the terrestrial Wealden facies of Hautrage (Mons Basin, Belgium).
Yans, Johan; Gerards, Thomas ULiege; Gerrienne, Philippe ULiege et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2010), 291

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See detailDid a Katian Large Igneous Province trigger the Late Ordovician glaciation ? A hypothesis tested with a carbon cycle model
Lefebvre, Vincent; Servais, Thomas; François, Louis ULiege et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2010), 296

The Ordovician is known as a period with high temperatures and high sea levels and a cooling event at the end of the period, leading to the Hirnantian glaciation and the !rst of the ‘big !ve’ mass ... [more ▼]

The Ordovician is known as a period with high temperatures and high sea levels and a cooling event at the end of the period, leading to the Hirnantian glaciation and the !rst of the ‘big !ve’ mass extinctions of marine life. The cause of this cooling event remains unclear. Several authors correlate it with a drop in atmospheric pCO2 to a threshold permitting the ice accumulation on the Gondwana supercontinent. However, what are the reasons of the atmospheric pCO2 decrease? Here, we follow the hypothesis initiated by Barnes (2004) that an Ordovician superplume event occurred during the Middle to Late Ordovician. Such an event would not only have a large impact on the Ordovician biodiversi!cation (Barnes, 2004) but it would also be responsible for the climatic upheaval during the Late Ordovician by the emplacement of a low latitudinal continental basaltic province that had an impact on the atmospheric pCO2. There is no direct evidence of a superplume event or of basaltic traps and the present study is therefore a hypothetical modelling approach where we demonstrate with a numerical box model, including carbon, alkalinity and phosphorus cycles coupled with a 1D climate model (energy balance model-EBM) (François and Walker,1992), that such a scenario allows to explain both the mid-Ashgill (Katian) global warming event, known as the Boda Event (Fortey and Cocks, 2005), and the subsequent Late Ordovician (Hirnantian) glaciation. Because silicate weathering is enhanced upon warm and wet climate, we try to constrain the size and the latitudinal emplacement of the basaltic province leading to a suf!cient consumption of atmospheric pCO2 to the threshold proposed by Herrmann et al. (2004 a, b) to initiate a glaciation on Gondwana. [less ▲]

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See detailFamennian charcoal of Belgium.
Prestianni, Cyrille ULiege; Decombeix, Anne-laure; Thorez, Jacques ULiege et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2010)

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See detailBulk organic geochemistry of sediments from Puyehue Lake and its watershed (Chile, 40°S): Implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions
Bertrand, Sébastien; Sterken, Mieke; Vargas-Ramirez, Lourdes et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2010), 294

Since the last deglaciation, the mid-latitudes of the southern Hemisphere have undergone considerable environmental changes. In order to better understand the response of continental ecosystems to ... [more ▼]

Since the last deglaciation, the mid-latitudes of the southern Hemisphere have undergone considerable environmental changes. In order to better understand the response of continental ecosystems to paleoclimate changes in southern South America, we investigated the sedimentary record of Puyehue Lake, located in the western piedmont of the Andes in South-Central Chile (40°S). We analyzed the elemental (C, N) and stable isotopic ([delta]13C, [delta]15N) composition of the sedimentary organic matter preserved in the lake and its watershed to estimate the relative changes in the sources of sedimentary organic carbon through space and time. The geochemical signature of the aquatic and terrestrial end-members was determined on samples of lake particulate organic matter (N/C: 0.130) and Holocene paleosols (N/C: 0.069), respectively. A simple mixing equation based on the N/C ratio of these end-members was then used to estimate the fraction of terrestrial carbon ([latin small letter f with hook]T) preserved in the lake sediments. Our approach was validated using surface sediment samples, which show a strong relation between [latin small letter f with hook]T and distance to the main rivers and to the shore. We further applied this equation to an 11.22 m long sediment core to reconstruct paleoenvironmental changes in Puyehue Lake and its watershed during the last 17.9 kyr. Our data provide evidence for a first warming pulse at 17.3 cal kyr BP, which triggered a rapid increase in lake diatom productivity, lagging the start of a similar increase in sea surface temperature (SST) off Chile by 1500 years. This delay is best explained by the presence of a large glacier in the lake watershed, which delayed the response time of the terrestrial proxies and limited the concomitant expansion of the vegetation in the lake watershed (low [latin small letter f with hook]T). A second warming pulse at 12.8 cal kyr BP is inferred from an increase in lake productivity and a major expansion of the vegetation in the lake watershed, demonstrating that the Puyehue glacier had considerably retreated from the watershed. This second warming pulse is synchronous with a 2 °C increase in SST off the coast of Chile, and its timing corresponds to the beginning of the Younger Dryas Chronozone. These results contribute to the mounting evidence that the climate in the mid-latitudes of the southern Hemisphere was warming during the Younger Dryas Chronozone, in agreement with the bipolar see-saw hypothesis. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon isotope lateral variability in a Middle Frasnian carbonate platform (Belgium): significance of facies, diagenesis and sea-level history
Da Silva, Anne-Christine ULiege; Boulvain, Frédéric ULiege

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2008), 269

Carbon isotopic variations of Frasnian shallow-water carbonates from Belgium are related to facies and major sea-level trends. The influence of the diagenetic overprint was assessed in order to determine ... [more ▼]

Carbon isotopic variations of Frasnian shallow-water carbonates from Belgium are related to facies and major sea-level trends. The influence of the diagenetic overprint was assessed in order to determine the primary signal of the Frasnian carbonates. Shallow-water microfacies are characterized by biostromes with stromatoporoids and lagoonal deposits dominated by carbonate mud and calcareous algae with subaerial exposure surfaces. The diagenetic history was controlled by three main events: early meteoric diagenesis (short-term subaerial exposure during deposition), late meteoric diagenesis (major Famennian regression) and burial diagenesis. The oxygen isotopic values are almost constant with respect to facies, original material (carbonate mud and cement) and sedimentological units (no differences before or after the main regression). This homogeneity is related to resetting during late meteoric diagenesis. The carbon isotopic values are related to facies (with the more negative values for the shallowest facies) and to major sea-level variations (most negative values after the main regression). This pattern is interpreted as being related to primary signals. This trend was enhanced by early meteoric diagenesis and the influence of more negative values from paleosols. The carbon isotope patterns reflect the influence of sea-level and water circulation on shallow water deposits and this influence implies that shallow-water carbonates are not necessarily good material for assessing the primary isotopic values of the ocean because of the influence of long residence time (“aging”) of the platform-top water and because of early diagenesis. [less ▲]

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