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See detailCompound heterozygous mutations in the luteinizing hormone receptor signal peptide causing 46,XY disorder of sex development.
NECHIFOR - POTORAC, Iulia ULiege; Trehan, Ashutosh; Szymanska, Kamila et al

in European journal of endocrinology (2019)

Testosterone production by the fetal testis depends on a functional relationship between hCG and the LH/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor (LHCGR). Failure of the receptor to correctly respond to its ligand ... [more ▼]

Testosterone production by the fetal testis depends on a functional relationship between hCG and the LH/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor (LHCGR). Failure of the receptor to correctly respond to its ligand leads to impaired sexual differentiation in males. A phenotypically-female patient with pubertal delay, had a 46,XY karyotype and was diagnosed with 46X,Y disorder of sex development (DSD). Novel compound heterozygous LHCGR mutations were found in the signal peptide: a duplication p.L10_Q17dup of maternal origin, and a deletion (p.K12_L15del) and a p.L16Q missense mutation of paternal origin. cAMP production was very low for both the deletion and duplication mutations and was halved for the missense mutant. The duplication and missense mutations were both expressed intracellularly, but at very low levels at the cell membrane; they were most likely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. The deletion mutant had a very limited intracellular expression, indicating impaired biosynthesis. There was reduced expression of all three mutants, which was most marked for the deletion mutation. There was also decreased protein expression of all three mutant receptors. In the deletion mutation, the presence of a lower molecular weight band corresponding to LHCGR monomer, probably due to lack of glycosylation, and a lack of bands corresponding to dimers/oligomers suggests absent ER entry. This novel case of 46X,Y DSD illustrates how three different LHCGR signal peptide mutations led to complete receptor inactivation by separate mechanisms. The study underlines the importance of specific regions of signal peptides and expands the spectrum of LHCGR mutations. [less ▲]

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See detailExcellent response to pasireotide therapy in an aggressive and dopamine-resistant prolactinoma.
Coopmans, Eva C.; van Meyel, Sebastiaan W. F.; Pieterman, Kay J. et al

in European journal of endocrinology (2019)

Prolactinomas are the most commonly encountered pituitary adenomas in the clinical setting. While most can be controlled by dopamine agonists, a subset of prolactinomas are dopamine-resistant and very ... [more ▼]

Prolactinomas are the most commonly encountered pituitary adenomas in the clinical setting. While most can be controlled by dopamine agonists, a subset of prolactinomas are dopamine-resistant and very aggressive. In such tumors, the treatment of choice is neurosurgery and radiotherapy, with or without temozolomide. Here, we report a patient with an highly aggressive, dopamine-resistant prolactinoma, who only achieved biochemical and tumor control during pasireotide long-acting release (PAS-LAR) therapy , a second-generation somatostatin receptor ligand (SRL). Interestingly, cystic degeneration, tumor cell necrosis, or both was observed after PAS-LAR administration suggesting an antitumor effect. This case shows that PAS-LAR therapy holds clinical potential in selective aggressive, dopamine-resistant prolactinomas that express somatostatin (SST) receptor subtype 5 and appears to be a potential new treatment option before starting temozolomide. In addition, PAS-LAR therapy may induce cystic degeneration, tumor cell necrosis, or both in prolactinomas. [less ▲]

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See detailMRI follow-up is unnecessary in patients with macroprolactinomas and long-term normal prolactin levels on dopamine agonist treatment.
Eroukhmanoff, J.; Tejedor, I.; Potorac, Iulia ULiege et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2017), 176(3), 323-328

OBJECTIVE: Both antitumor and antisecretory efficacies of dopamine agonists (DA) make them the first-line treatment of macroprolactinomas. However, there is no guideline for MRI follow-up once prolactin ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Both antitumor and antisecretory efficacies of dopamine agonists (DA) make them the first-line treatment of macroprolactinomas. However, there is no guideline for MRI follow-up once prolactin is controlled. The aim of our study was to determine whether a regular MRI follow-up was necessary in patients with long-term normal prolactin levels under DA. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective multicenter study (Marseille, Paris La Pitie Salpetriere and Nancy, France; Liege, Belgium) including patients with macroprolactinomas (largest diameter: >10 mm and baseline prolactin level: >100 ng/mL) treated by dopamine agonists, and regularly followed (pituitary MRI and prolactin levels) during at least 48 months once normal prolactin level was obtained. RESULTS: In total, 115 patients were included (63 men and 52 women; mean age at diagnosis: 36.3 years). Mean baseline prolactin level was 2224 +/- 6839 ng/mL. No significant increase of tumor volume was observed during the follow-up. Of the 21 patients (18%) who presented asymptomatic hemorrhagic changes of the macroprolactinoma on MRI, 2 had a tumor increase (2 and 7 mm in the largest size). Both were treated by cabergoline (1 mg/week) with normal prolactin levels obtained for 6 and 24 months. For both patients, no further growth was observed on MRI during follow-up at the same dose of cabergoline. CONCLUSION: No significant increase of tumor size was observed in our patients with controlled prolactin levels on DA. MRI follow-up thus appears unnecessary in patients with biologically controlled macroprolactinomas. [less ▲]

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See detailCabergoline for Cushing's disease: a large retrospective multicenter study.
Ferriere, A.; Cortet, C.; Chanson, P. et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2017), 176(3), 305-314

OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of cabergoline in Cushing's disease (CD) is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of cabergoline in a large contemporary cohort of ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of cabergoline in Cushing's disease (CD) is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of cabergoline in a large contemporary cohort of patients with CD. DESIGN: We conducted a retrospective multicenter study from thirteen French and Belgian university hospitals. METHODS: Sixty-two patients with CD received cabergoline monotherapy or add-on therapy. Symptom score, biological markers of hypercortisolism and adverse effects were recorded. RESULTS: Twenty-one (40%) of 53 patients who received cabergoline monotherapy had normal urinary free cortisol (UFC) values within 12 months (complete responders), and five of these patients developed corticotropic insufficiency. The fall in UFC was associated with significant reductions in midnight cortisol and plasma ACTH, and with clinical improvement. Compared to other patients, complete responders had similar median baseline UFC (2.0 vs 2.5xULN) and plasma prolactin concentrations but received lower doses of cabergoline (1.5 vs 3.5 mg/week, P < 0.05). During long-term treatment (>12 months), cabergoline was withdrawn in 28% of complete responders because of treatment escape or intolerance. Overall, sustained control of hypercortisolism was obtained in 23% of patients for 32.5 months (19-105). Nine patients on steroidogenesis inhibitors received cabergoline add-on therapy for 19 months (1-240). Hypercortisolism was controlled in 56% of these patients during the first year of treatment with cabergoline at 1.0 mg/week (0.5-3.5). CONCLUSIONS: About 20-25% of CD patients are good responders to cabergoline therapy allowing long-term control of hypercortisolism at relatively low dosages and with acceptable tolerability. No single parameter, including the baseline UFC and prolactin levels, predicted the response to cabergoline. [less ▲]

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See detailA multivariable prediction model for pegvisomant dosing: monotherapy and in combination with long-acting somatostatin analogues
Franck, Sanne Elisabeth; Korevaar, Tim; PETROSSIANS, Patrick ULiege et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2017)

Background: Effective treatment of acromegaly with pegvisomant (PEGV), a growth hormone receptor antagonist, requires an appropriate dose titration. PEGV doses vary widely among individual patients, and ... [more ▼]

Background: Effective treatment of acromegaly with pegvisomant (PEGV), a growth hormone receptor antagonist, requires an appropriate dose titration. PEGV doses vary widely among individual patients, and various covariates may affect its dosing and pharmacokinetics. Objective: To identify predictors of the PEGV dose required to normalize insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels during PEGV monotherapy and in combination with long-acting somatostatin analogues (LA-SSAs). 188) were meta-analysed as a form of external replication to study the predictors of PEGV dosing in addition to LA-SSA, the LAS (n=83) was used to study the predictors of PEGV monotherapy dosing. Multivariable regression models were used to identify predictors of the PEGV dose required to normalize IGF-I levels. <0.001, p=<0.001, p=0.028 and p=0.047, respectively). Taken together, these characteristics predicted the PEGV normalization dose correctly in 63.3% of all patients within a range of +/- 60 mg/week (21.3% within a range of +/- 20 mg/week). For monotherapy, only weight was associated with the PEGV normalization dose (p=<0.001) and predicted this dosage correctly in 77.1% of all patients within a range of +/- 60 mg/week (31.3% within a range of +/- 20 mg/week). Conclusion: In this study, we show that IGF-I levels, weight, height and age can contribute to define the optimal PEGV dose in order to normalize IGF-I levels in addition to LA-SSA. For PEGV monotherapy, only the patient's weight was associated with the IGF-I normalization PEGV dosage. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in the management and comorbidities of acromegaly over three decades. The French Acromegaly Registry.
Maione, Luigi; Brue, Thierry; Beckers, Albert ULiege et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2017), 176(5), 645-655

CONTEXT: Acromegaly is a rare disease associated with chronic multisystem complications. National registries have been created in several countries. DESIGN: The French registry contains data on acromegaly ... [more ▼]

CONTEXT: Acromegaly is a rare disease associated with chronic multisystem complications. National registries have been created in several countries. DESIGN: The French registry contains data on acromegaly epidemiology, management and comorbidities recorded over more than three decades, retrospectively until 1999 and prospectively from 1999 until 2012. RESULTS: Data could be analyzed for 999 of the 1034 patients included in the registry (46% males). Disease control, defined as IGF-I normalization (adjusted for age and sex), was achieved in 75% of patients at the last follow-up visit. Half the patients with uncontrolled disease had IGF-I levels below 1.5 times the upper limit of normal (ULN). The proportion of patients with surgically cured disease did not change markedly over time, whereas the proportion of patients with uncontrolled disease fell and the proportion of patients with medically controlled disease rose. Cardiovascular, metabolic, respiratory and rheumatologic comorbidities and their outcomes were recorded for most patients, and no noteworthy overall deterioration was noted over time. Cancer occurred in 10% of patients, for a standardized incidence ratio of 1.34 (95% CI, 0.94-1.87) in men and 1.24 (0.77-1.73) in women. Forty-one patients died during follow-up, for a standardized mortality ratio of 1.05 (0.70-1.42). Most deaths were due to cancer. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of patients with acromegaly now have successful disease control thanks to multistep management. The incidence of comorbidities following diagnosis of acromegaly is very low. Life expectancy is now close to that of the general population, probably owing to better management of the GH/IGF-I excess and comorbidities. [less ▲]

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See detailMANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Pituitary "incidentaloma": Neuroradiological assessment and differential diagnosis.
Vasilev, Vladimir; Rostomyan, Liliya ULiege; Daly, Adrian ULiege et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2016), 175(4), 171184

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See detailTriiodothyronine-predominant Graves’ disease in childhood: detection and therapeutic implications
HARVENGT, Julie ULiege; boizeau, priscilla; chevenne, didier et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2015), 172(6), 715-723

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See detailA novel inactivating mutation of the LH/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor with impaired membrane trafficking leading to Leydig cell hypoplasia type 1.
Rivero-Muller, Adolfo; Potorac, Iulia ULiege; Pintiaux, Axelle ULiege et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2015), 172(6), 27-36

OBJECTIVE: The LH/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor (LHCGR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays a central role in male sexual differentiation, regulation of ovarian follicular maturation ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The LH/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor (LHCGR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays a central role in male sexual differentiation, regulation of ovarian follicular maturation, ovulation and maintenance of corpus luteum and pregnancy, as well as maintenance of testicular testosterone production. Mutations in the LHCGR gene are very rare. The aim of this work was to study the clinical and molecular characteristics of a rare familial LHCGR mutation. METHODS: Five affected members of a family, including a phenotypically female, but genotypically male (46,XY), patient with Leydig cell hypoplasia type 1 and four genotypically female siblings with reproductive abnormalities, were studied genetically. Cell trafficking studies as well as signalling studies of mutated receptor were performed. RESULTS: The five affected patients were all homozygous for a novel mutation in the LHCGR gene, a deletion of guanine in position 1850 (1850delG). This resulted in a frameshift affecting most of the C-terminal intracellular domain. In vitro studies demonstrated that the 1850delG receptor was completely incapable of transit to the cell membrane, becoming trapped within the endoplasmic reticulum. This could not be rescued by small-molecule agonist treatment or stimulated intracellularly by co-expression of a yoked human chorionic gonadotrophin. CONCLUSIONS: This novel LHCGR mutation leads to complete inactivation of the LHCGR receptor due to trafficking and signalling abnormalities, which improves our understanding of the impact of the affected structural domain on receptor trafficking and function. [less ▲]

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See detailTHERAPY OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Outcomes in patients with Cushing's disease undergoing transsphenoidal surgery: systematic review assessing criteria used to define remission and recurrence.
Petersenn, Stephan; Beckers, Albert ULiege; Ferone, Diego et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2015), 172(6), 227-239

Objective: A number of factors can influence the reported outcomes of transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) for Cushing's disease - including different remission and recurrence criteria, for which there is no ... [more ▼]

Objective: A number of factors can influence the reported outcomes of transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) for Cushing's disease - including different remission and recurrence criteria, for which there is no consensus. Therefore, a comparative analysis of the best treatment options and patient management strategies is difficult. In this review, we investigated the clinical outcomes of initial TSS in patients with Cushing's disease based on definitions of and assessments for remission and recurrence. Methods: We systematically searched PubMed and identified 44 studies with clear definitions of remission and recurrence. When data were available, additional analyses by time of remission, tumour size, duration of follow-up, surgical experience, year of study publication, and adverse events related to surgery were performed. Results: Of the 44 articles selected, only one reported endoscopic TSS. Data from a total of 6,400 patients who received microscopic TSS were extracted and analysed. A variety of definitions of remission and recurrence of Cushing's disease after initial microscopic TSS was used, giving broad ranges of remission (42.0-96.6%; median, 77.9%) and recurrence (3.1-47.4%; median, 11.5%). Better remission and recurrence outcomes were achieved for micro- versus macroadenomas; however, no correlations were found with other parameters, other than improved safety with longer surgical experience. Conclusions: The variety of methodologies used in clinical evaluation of TSS for Cushing's disease strongly support the call for standardization and optimization of studies to inform clinical practice and maximize patient outcomes. Clinically significant rates of failure of initial TSS highlight the need for effective second-line treatments. [less ▲]

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See detailUnravelling the intra-familial correlations and heritability of tumor types in MEN1, a GTE study.
Thevenon, Julien; Bourredjem, Abderrahmane; Faivre, Laurence et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2015), 173(6), 819-826

BACKGROUND: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 1 (MEN1), which is secondary to mutation of the MEN1 gene, is a rare autosomal-dominant disease that predisposes mutation carriers to endocrine ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 1 (MEN1), which is secondary to mutation of the MEN1 gene, is a rare autosomal-dominant disease that predisposes mutation carriers to endocrine tumors. Most studies demonstrated the absence of direct genotype-phenotype correlations. The existence of a higher risk of death in the GTE-cohort associated with a mutations in the JunD interacting domain, suggests heterogeneity across families in disease expressivity. This study aims to assess the existence of modifying genetic factors by estimating the intra-familial correlations and heritability of the six main tumor types in MEN1. METHODS: The study included 797 patients from 265 kindred and studied seven phenotypic criteria: parathyroid and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), pituitary, adrenal, bronchial and thymic tumors (ThNETs) and the presence of metastasis. Intra-familial correlations and heritability estimates were calculated from family tree data using specific validated statistical analysis software. RESULTS: Intra-familial correlations were significant and decreased along parental degrees distance for pituitary, adrenal and th-NETs. The heritability of these three tumor types was consistently strong and significant with 64% (Standard Error [SE]=0.13; p < 0.001) for pituitary tumor, 65% (SE=0,21; p < 0.001) for adrenal tumors, and 97% (SE=0.41; p=0.006) for thNETs. CONCLUSION: The present study shows the existence of modifying genetic factors for thymus, adrenal and pituitary MEN1 tumor types. The identification of at-risk subgroups of individuals within cohorts is the first step towards personalization of care. Next generation sequencing on this subset of tumors will help identify the molecular basis of MEN1 variable genetic expressivity. [less ▲]

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See detailCorrection of vitamin D insufficiency with combined strontium ranelate and vitamin D3 in osteoporotic patients.
Rizzoli, R.; Dawson-Hughes, B.; Kaufman, J.-M. et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2014), 170(3), 441-50

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the efficacy and safety of oral fixed-dose combination of strontium ranelate 2 g/vitamin D3 1000 IU daily vs strontium ranelate 2 g daily for correcting vitamin D ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the efficacy and safety of oral fixed-dose combination of strontium ranelate 2 g/vitamin D3 1000 IU daily vs strontium ranelate 2 g daily for correcting vitamin D insufficiency in osteoporosis. DESIGN: A 6-month international, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, phase 3 study. METHODS: A total of 518 men and postmenopausal women aged >/=50 years with primary osteoporosis (T-score </=-2.5 s.d.) and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) >22.5 nmol/l were included. Patients were allocated to strontium ranelate 2 g/vitamin D3 1000 IU daily (n=413) or strontium ranelate 2 g daily (n=105). The participants received calcium 1 g daily. The primary endpoint was serum 25(OH)D at last post-baseline evaluation during 3 months. RESULTS: Both groups were comparable at baseline. Mean baseline of 25(OH)D was 44.1+/-14.6 nmol/l. After 3 months, the percentage of patients with 25(OH)D >/=50 nmol/l was higher with strontium ranelate/vitamin D3 vs strontium ranelate (84 vs 44%, P<0.001; adjusted between-group odds ratio=6.7; 95% CI, 4.2-10.9). The efficacy of the fixed-dose combination on 25(OH)D was maintained at 6 months (86 vs 40%, P<0.001). Mean 25(OH)D was 65.1 and 49.5 nmol/l, respectively, after 3 months and 66.9 and 45.4 nmol/l after 6 months. Physical performance improved in both groups. Falls were 17 and 20% in the strontium ranelate/vitamin D3 and strontium ranelate groups respectively. Parathyroid hormone levels were inversely correlated with 25(OH)D. No clinically relevant differences in safety were observed. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the efficacy and safety of fixed-dose combination of strontium ranelate 2 g/vitamin D3 1000 IU for correction of vitamin D insufficiency in osteoporotic patients. [less ▲]

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See detailSerum sclerostin levels in men with idiopathic osteoporosis
Lapauw, Bruno; Vandewalle, S.; Taes, Y. et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2013), 168(4), 615-620

Objective: Sclerostin inhibits osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. If aberrant sclerostin action is involved in less efficient bone acquisition in men with idiopathic low bone mass, this might ... [more ▼]

Objective: Sclerostin inhibits osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. If aberrant sclerostin action is involved in less efficient bone acquisition in men with idiopathic low bone mass, this might be reflected in higher serum sclerostin levels. Methods: In 116 men with idiopathic osteoporosis (%65 years old), 40 of their sons and healthy controls, areal bone parameters were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and volumetric and geometric bone parameters were measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Serum analytes were measured using immunoassays and estradiol (E2) levels using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Men with idiopathic low bone mass had lower levels of sclerostin than the controls (0.54G 0.17 vs 0.66G0.23 ng/ml; P!0.001). In both groups, sclerostin levels were strongly associated with age; when adjusting for age, no associations with anthropometrics were observed (PO0.14). In multivariate analyses, sclerostin levels displayed a positive association with whole-body bone mineral content (BMC) and areal BMD (aBMD), as well as with trabecular and cortical volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) at the tibia in the probands. No clear associations were observed in the control group, neither were sclerostin levels associated with BMC at the radius or lumbar spine (all PO0.11). Testosterone, but not E2, was inversely related to sclerostin levels in the probands. No difference in sclerostin levels was found in their sons when compared with their controls. Conclusion: Lower rather than higher serum sclerostin levels in the probands with idiopathic low bone mass suggest that aberrant sclerostin secretion is not involved in the pathogenesis of low bone mass in these subjects. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic analysis in young patients with sporadic pituitary macroadenomas:Beside AIP don't forget MEN1 genetic analysis.
Cuny, Thomas; Pertuit, Morgane; Sahnoun-Fathallah, Mouna et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2013)

CONTEXT: germline mutations in the AIP gene have been identified in young patients (age </= 30 years old) with sporadic pituitary macroadenomas. Otherwise, there are few data concerning the prevalence of ... [more ▼]

CONTEXT: germline mutations in the AIP gene have been identified in young patients (age </= 30 years old) with sporadic pituitary macroadenomas. Otherwise, there are few data concerning the prevalence of MEN1 mutations in such population. OBJECTIVE: We assessed the prevalence of both AIP and MEN1 genetic abnormalities (mutations and large gene deletions) in young patients (age </= 30 years old) diagnosed with sporadic and isolated macroadenoma, without hypercalcemia and/or MEN1-associated lesions. DESIGN: The entire coding sequences of AIP and MEN1 were screened for mutations. In cases of negative sequencing screening, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed for the detection of large genetic deletions. PATIENTS AND SETTINGS: 174 patients from Endocrinology Departments of 15 French University Hospital Centers were eligible for this study. RESULTS: 21/174(12%) patients had AIP (n=15, 8.6%) or MEN1 (n=6, 3.4%) mutations. In pediatric patients (age </= 18 years old), AIP/MEN1 mutation frequency reached nearly 22% (n=10/46). AIPmut and MEN1mut were respectively identified in 8/79 (10.1%) and 1/79 (1.2%) somatotropinoma patients; they each accounted for 4/74 (5.4%) prolactinoma patients with mutations. Half of patients (n=3/6) with gigantism displayed mutations in AIP. Interestingly, 4/12 (33%) patients with non-secreting adenomas bore either AIP or MEN1 mutations, whereas none of the 8 corticotroph-adenomas and a single thyrotropinoma case had mutations. No large gene deletions were observed in sequencing-negative patients. CONCLUSION: mutations in MEN1 can be of significance in young patients with sporadic isolated pituitary macroadenomas, particularly prolactinomas, and together with AIP, we suggest genetic analysis of MEN1 in such population. [less ▲]

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See detailProlactinomas Resistant to Standard Doses of Cabergoline : A multicenter study of 92 patients
VROONEN, Laurent ULiege; Jaffrain-Rea, ML; PETROSSIANS, Patrick ULiege et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2012), 167

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See detailAdrenal involvement in MEN1. Analysis of 715 cases from the Groupe d'etude des Tumeurs Endocrines database.
Gatta-Cherifi, B.; Chabre, O.; Murat, A. et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2012), 166(2), 269-279

Objective Limited data regarding adrenal involvement in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is available. We describe the characteristics of MEN1-associated adrenal lesions in a large cohort to ... [more ▼]

Objective Limited data regarding adrenal involvement in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is available. We describe the characteristics of MEN1-associated adrenal lesions in a large cohort to provide a rationale for their management. Methods Analysis of records from 715 MEN1 patients from a multicentre database between 1956 and 2008. Adrenal lesions were compared with those from a multicentre cohort of 144 patients with adrenal sporadic incidentalomas. Results Adrenal enlargement was reported in 20.4% (146/715) of patients. Adrenal tumours (>10 mm in size) accounted for 58.1% of these cases (10.1% of the whole patient cohort). Tumours were bilateral and >40 mm in size in 12.5 and 19.4% of cases respectively. Hormonal hypersecretion was restricted to patients with tumours and occurred in 15.3% of them. Compared with incidentalomas, MEN1-related tumours exhibited more cases of primary hyperaldosteronism, fewer pheochromocytomas and more adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs; 13.8 vs 1.3%). Ten ACCs occurred in eight patients. Interestingly, ACCs occurred after several years of follow-up of small adrenal tumours in two of the eight affected patients. Nine of the ten ACCs were classified as stage I or II according to the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors. No evident genotype/phenotype correlation was found for the occurrence of adrenal lesions, endocrine hypersecretion or ACC. Conclusions Adrenal pathology in MEN1 differs from that observed in sporadic incidentalomas. In the absence of relevant symptoms, endocrine biology can be restricted to patients with adrenal tumours and should focus on steroid secretion including the aldosterone-renin system. MEN1 is a high-risk condition for the occurrence of ACCs. It should be considered regardless of the size of the tumour. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh prevalence of AIP gene mutations following focused screening in young patients with sporadic pituitary macroadenomas.
Tichomirowa, Maria A; Barlier, Anne; Daly, Adrian ULiege et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2011), 165(4), 509-15

BACKGROUND: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) mutations (AIPmut) cause aggressive pituitary adenomas in young patients, usually in the setting of familial isolated pituitary adenomas ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) mutations (AIPmut) cause aggressive pituitary adenomas in young patients, usually in the setting of familial isolated pituitary adenomas. The prevalence of AIPmut among sporadic pituitary adenoma patients appears to be low; studies have not addressed prevalence in the most clinically relevant population. Hence, we undertook an international, multicenter, prospective genetic, and clinical analysis at 21 tertiary referral endocrine departments. METHODS: We included 163 sporadic pituitary macroadenoma patients irrespective of clinical phenotype diagnosed at <30 years of age. RESULTS: Overall, 19/163 (11.7%) patients had germline AIPmut; a further nine patients had sequence changes of uncertain significance or polymorphisms. AIPmut were identified in 8/39 (20.5%) pediatric patients. Ten AIPmut were identified in 11/83 (13.3%) sporadic somatotropinoma patients, in 7/61 (11.5%) prolactinoma patients, and in 1/16 non-functioning pituitary adenoma patients. Large genetic deletions were not seen using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Familial screening was possible in the relatives of seven patients with AIPmut and carriers were found in six of the seven families. In total, pituitary adenomas were diagnosed in 2/21 AIPmut-screened carriers; both had asymptomatic microadenomas. CONCLUSION: Germline AIPmut occur in 11.7% of patients <30 years with sporadic pituitary macroadenomas and in 20.5% of pediatric patients. AIPmut mutation testing in this population should be considered in order to optimize clinical genetic investigation and management. [less ▲]

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See detailGender-related differences in MEN1 lesion occurrence and diagnosis: a cohort study of 734 cases from the Groupe d''etude des Tumeurs Endocrines
goudet, p; Bonithon-Kopp, C.; Murat, A. et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2011)

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See detailMutations of calcium-sensing receptor gene: two novel mutations and overview of impact on calcium homeostasis
Livadariu, E.; Auriemma, R. S.; Rydlewski, C. et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2011)

Objective: Genetic disorders of calcium metabolism arise in a familial or sporadic setting. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) plays a key role in maintaining calcium homeostasis and study of the CASR ... [more ▼]

Objective: Genetic disorders of calcium metabolism arise in a familial or sporadic setting. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) plays a key role in maintaining calcium homeostasis and study of the CASR gene can be clinically useful in determining etiology and appropriate therapeutic approaches. We report two cases of novel CASR gene mutations that illustrate the varying clinical presentations and discuss these in terms of the current understanding of CaSR function. Patients and Methods: A 16 yr-old patient had mild hypercalcemia associated with low-normal urinary calcium excretion and normal-to-high parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. Because of negative family history, familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) was originally excluded. The second patient was a 54 yr-old man with symptomatic hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, low PTH, and mild hypercalciuria. Familial investigation revealed the same phenotype in the patient's sister. The coding region of the CaSR gene was sequenced in both probands and their available first-degree relatives. Results: The first patient had a novel heterozygous inactivating CASR mutation in exon 4, which predicted a p.A423K change; genetic analysis was negative in the parents. The second patient had a novel heterozygous activating CASR mutation in exon 6, which predicted a p.E556K change; the affected sister of the proband was also positive. Conclusions: We reported two novel heterozygous mutations of the CASR gene, an inactivating mutation in exon 4 and the first activating mutation reported to date in exon 6. These cases illustrate the importance of genetic testing of CASR gene to aid correct diagnosis and to assist in clinical management. [less ▲]

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