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See detailOntogeny of swimming movement in bronze corydoras (Corydoras aeneus)
Mauguit, Quentin; Olivier, Damien ULiege; Vandewalle, Nicolas ULiege et al

in Canadian Journal of Zoology (2010), 88(4), 378-389

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See detailInfluence of nest location and infertile eggs on hatching success of leatherback turtle nests in French Guiana
Caut, Stéphane; Guirlet, Elodie ULiege; Jouquet, Pascal et al

in Canadian Journal of Zoology (2006), 84

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See detailOn the origin and systematics of the northern African wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) populations: a comparative study of mtDNA restriction patterns
Libois, Roland ULiege; Michaux, Johan ULiege; Ramalhinho, M. G. et al

in Canadian Journal of Zoology (2001), 79(8), 1503-1511

Conflicting hypotheses have been formulated regarding the origin of wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) populations in northern Africa. In this study, the mtDNA restriction patterns of mice (n = 28 ... [more ▼]

Conflicting hypotheses have been formulated regarding the origin of wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) populations in northern Africa. In this study, the mtDNA restriction patterns of mice (n = 28) collected in Tunisia and Morocco are compared with those of representatives from southern Europe (n = 102). The neighbour-joining tree confirms the existence of the three lineages previously found in the Mediterranean area: western, Tyrrhenian-Balkan, and Sicilian. The western group is isolated from the two others, with bootstrap values of 89 and 95%. Northern African patterns are included in the western group. Their variability is low, the same pattern being shared by five Tunisian and all Moroccan animals (n = 18), caught either in the north of the country (Cap Spartel) or in the south (Marrakech). This implies that northern African wood mouse populations have a southwestern European origin and that their presence in the region is probably recent, which corresponds to both paleontological data and the hypothesis of anthropogenic introduction. [less ▲]

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See detailSize-related predation reduces intramorph competition in paedomorphic Alpine newts
Denoël, Mathieu ULiege; Joly, Pierre

in Canadian Journal of Zoology (2001), 79(6), 943-948

Evolutionary theory assumes that facultative paedomorphosis in newts and salamanders is adaptive in allowing either a younger age at maturity or resource partitioning between the heterochronic morphs. In ... [more ▼]

Evolutionary theory assumes that facultative paedomorphosis in newts and salamanders is adaptive in allowing either a younger age at maturity or resource partitioning between the heterochronic morphs. In newt populations that only take the metamorphic ontogenetic pathway, juveniles are terrestrial and avoid food competition with larvae and breeding adults. In contrast, in populations where paedomorphosis occurs, branchiate newts of all sizes coexist in the aquatic habitats, posing the question of whether intramorph competition exists and its relationship with the evolution of paedomorphosis. We studied size-related predation in such a size-structured community of branchiate Alpine newts (Triturus alpestris) inhabiting a deep alpine lake. Although gape limitation may explain such size-related predation, individuals also exhibited selectivity according to prey size. Amongst small prey that were within the capture range of all newt size classes, smaller newts preyed on smaller items than did larger ones. We assume that such decisions favour the coexistence of different-sized individuals. It is suspected that such size-selective predation on items which are avoided by water-living metamorphs allows the maintenance of facultative paedomorphosis, in favouring resource partitioning between morphs. [less ▲]

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