References of "Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases"
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See detailRevised 2017 international consensus on ANCA testing in small vessel vasculitis: support from an external quality assessment.
Broeders, Sylvia; Goletti, Sylvie; Tomasi, Jean-Paul et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2019)

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See detailDifferent glucosamine sulfate products generate different outcomes on osteoarthritis symptoms
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege; Cooper, Cyrus

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2018), 77(7), 1-2

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See detailEFFICACY OF BIO-OPTIMISED CURCUMA EXTRACT (FLEXOFYTOL®) FOR PAINFUL KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: DATA FROM COPRA, A MULTICENTER RANDOMISED CONTROLLED STUDY
Henrotin, Yves ULiege; Malaise, Michel ULiege; Wittoek, R et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2018, June), 77(supplement 2), 790

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See detailHYALURONAN DERIVATIVE HYMOVIS® INCREASES CARTILAGE VOLUME AND TYPE II COLLAGEN TURNOVER IN OSTEOARHRITIC KNEE: DATA FROM MOKHA STUDY
Henrotin, Yves ULiege; Bannuru, R; Malaise, Michel ULiege et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2018, June), 77(supplement 2), 1614

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See detailTHE COLL2–1 PEPTIDE OF COLLAGEN TYPE II: A NEW ACTOR OF SYNOVITIS IN OSTEOARTHRITIS
Lambert, Cécile ULiege; Borderie, D; Rannou, F et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2018, June), 77(supplement 2), 890

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See detailGLUCOSEPANE : A NEW BIOMARKER OF THE SEVERITY OF OSTEOARTHRITIS
Rabbani, N; Ahmed, U; Lambert, Cécile ULiege et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2018, June), 77(supplement 2), 181

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See detailProteomic analysis of osteoblasts secretome provides new insights in mechanisms underlying osteoarthritis subchondral bone sclerosis
Sanchez, Christelle ULiege; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel ULiege; Comblain, Fanny et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2018, June), 77(supplement 2), 894

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See detailDifferentiation between various Chondroitin sulfate formulations in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2017)

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See detailPharmaceutical-grade Chondroitin sulfate is as effective as celecoxib and superior to placebo in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: the Chondroitin versus Celecoxib versus placebo trial (CONCEPT)
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege; Dudler, J; Blicharski, T et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2017), 0n line

Objectives : Chondroitin sulfate 800 mg/day (CS) pharmaceutical-grade in the management of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis consistent with the European Medicines Agency guideline. Methods: A prospective ... [more ▼]

Objectives : Chondroitin sulfate 800 mg/day (CS) pharmaceutical-grade in the management of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis consistent with the European Medicines Agency guideline. Methods: A prospective, randomised, 6-month, 3-arm, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo and celecoxib (200 mg/day)-controlled trial assessing changes in pain on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and in the Lequesne Index (LI) as coprimary endpoints. Minimal-Clinically Important Improvement (MCII), Patient-Acceptable Symptoms State (PASS) were used as secondary endpoints. Results: 604 patients (knee osteoarthritis) diagnosed according to American College of Rheumalogy (ACR) criteria, recruited in five European countries and followed for 182 days. CS and celecoxib showed a greater significant reduction in pain and LI than placebo. In the intention-to-treat (ITT) population, pain reduction in VAS at day 182 in the CS group (−42.6 mm) and in celecoxib group (−39.5 mm) was significantly greater than the placebo group (−33.3 mm) (p=0.001 for CS and p=0.009 for celecoxib), while no difference observed between CS and celecoxib. Similar trend for the LI, as reduction in this metric in the CS group (−4.7) and celecoxib group (−4.6) was significantly greater than the placebo group (−3.7) (p=0.023 for CS and p=0.015 for celecoxib), no difference was observed between CS and celecoxib. Both secondary endpoints (MCII and PASS) at day 182 improved significantly in the CS and celecoxib groups. All treatments demonstrated excellent safety profiles. Conclusion: A 800 mg/day pharmaceutical-grade CS is superior to placebo and similar to celecoxib in reducing pain and improving function over 6 months in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This formulation of CS should be considered a first-line treatment in the medical management of knee OA. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of chondroitin sulfate on soluble biomarkers of osteoarthritis: how to analyze and interpret the results from an open-label trial in unilateral knee osteoarthritis patients
Möller, I; Gharbi, Myriam; Martinez, H et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2016, June), 75(Suppl 2), 1167

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See detailCombined chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine for painful knee osteoarthritis: a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, non-inferiority trial versus celecoxib
Hochberg, M. C.; Martel-Pelletier, J.; Monfort, J. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2016), 75(1), 37-44

OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy and safety of chondroitin sulfate plus glucosamine hydrochloride (CS+GH) versus celecoxib in patients with knee osteoarthritis and severe pain. METHODS: Double-blind ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy and safety of chondroitin sulfate plus glucosamine hydrochloride (CS+GH) versus celecoxib in patients with knee osteoarthritis and severe pain. METHODS: Double-blind Multicentre Osteoarthritis interVEntion trial with SYSADOA (MOVES) conducted in France, Germany, Poland and Spain evaluating treatment with CS+GH versus celecoxib in 606 patients with Kellgren and Lawrence grades 2-3 knee osteoarthritis and moderate-to-severe pain (Western Ontario and McMaster osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) score >/=301; 0-500 scale). Patients were randomised to receive 400 mg CS plus 500 mg GH three times a day or 200 mg celecoxib every day for 6 months. The primary outcome was the mean decrease in WOMAC pain from baseline to 6 months. Secondary outcomes included WOMAC function and stiffness, visual analogue scale for pain, presence of joint swelling/effusion, rescue medication consumption, Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OMERACT-OARSI) criteria and EuroQoL-5D. RESULTS: The adjusted mean change (95% CI) in WOMAC pain was -185.7 (-200.3 to -171.1) (50.1% decrease) with CS+GH and -186.8 (-201.7 to -171.9) (50.2% decrease) with celecoxib, meeting the non-inferiority margin of -40: -1.11 (-22.0 to 19.8; p=0.92). All sensitivity analyses were consistent with that result. At 6 months, 79.7% of patients in the combination group and 79.2% in the celecoxib group fulfilled OMERACT-OARSI criteria. Both groups elicited a reduction >50% in the presence of joint swelling; a similar reduction was seen for effusion. No differences were observed for the other secondary outcomes. Adverse events were low and similarly distributed between groups. CONCLUSIONS: CS+GH has comparable efficacy to celecoxib in reducing pain, stiffness, functional limitation and joint swelling/effusion after 6 months in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis, with a good safety profile. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01425853. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease
SMOLEN, J.S.; COLLAUD BASSET, S.; BOERS, M. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2016), 75

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial ... [more ▼]

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft ‘Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA’ released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic architecture distinguishes systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis from other forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical and therapeutic implications.
Ombrello, Michael J.; Arthur, Victoria L.; Remmers, Elaine F. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2016)

OBJECTIVES: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of conditions unified by the presence of chronic childhood arthritis without an identifiable cause. Systemic JIA (sJIA) is a rare ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of conditions unified by the presence of chronic childhood arthritis without an identifiable cause. Systemic JIA (sJIA) is a rare form of JIA characterised by systemic inflammation. sJIA is distinguished from other forms of JIA by unique clinical features and treatment responses that are similar to autoinflammatory diseases. However, approximately half of children with sJIA develop destructive, long-standing arthritis that appears similar to other forms of JIA. Using genomic approaches, we sought to gain novel insights into the pathophysiology of sJIA and its relationship with other forms of JIA. METHODS: We performed a genome-wide association study of 770 children with sJIA collected in nine countries by the International Childhood Arthritis Genetics Consortium. Single nucleotide polymorphisms were tested for association with sJIA. Weighted genetic risk scores were used to compare the genetic architecture of sJIA with other JIA subtypes. RESULTS: The major histocompatibility complex locus and a locus on chromosome 1 each showed association with sJIA exceeding the threshold for genome-wide significance, while 23 other novel loci were suggestive of association with sJIA. Using a combination of genetic and statistical approaches, we found no evidence of shared genetic architecture between sJIA and other common JIA subtypes. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of shared genetic risk factors between sJIA and other JIA subtypes supports the hypothesis that sJIA is a unique disease process and argues for a different classification framework. Research to improve sJIA therapy should target its unique genetics and specific pathophysiological pathways. [less ▲]

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See detailBaseline characteristics of the Liège Hand Osteoarthritis Cohort (LIHOC)
NEUPREZ, Audrey ULiege; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege; Dardenne, Nadia ULiege et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2015), 74(Supp2), 1346

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See detailAssessment and determinants of aesthetic discomfort in hand osteoarthritis
Neuprez, Audrey ULiege; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege; Dardenne, Nadia ULiege et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2015), 74

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See detailAssessment and determinants of aesthetic discomfort in hand osteoarthritis: the LIège Hand Osteoarthritis Cohort (LIHOC)
Neuprez, Audrey ULiege; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege; Dardenne, Nadia ULiege et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2015), 74(Supp2), 110

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See detailResponse to Dr Bolland's eLetter: Strontium and cardiovascular events.
REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULiege

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2014), 73(2), 9

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See detailWhat is the predictive value of MRI for the occurrence of knee replacement surgery in knee osteoarthritis?
Pelletier, J.-P.; Cooper, C.; Peterfy, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2013), 72(10), 1594-1604

Knee osteoarthritis is associated with structural changes in the joint. Despite its many drawbacks, radiography is the current standard for evaluating joint structure in trials of potential disease ... [more ▼]

Knee osteoarthritis is associated with structural changes in the joint. Despite its many drawbacks, radiography is the current standard for evaluating joint structure in trials of potential disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs. MRI is a non-invasive alternative that provides comprehensive imaging of the whole joint. Frequently used MRI measurements in knee osteoarthritis are cartilage volume and thickness; others include synovitis, synovial fluid effusions, bone marrow lesions (BML) and meniscal damage. Joint replacement is considered a clinically relevant outcome in knee osteoarthritis; however, its utility in clinical trials is limited. An alternative is virtual knee replacement on the basis of symptoms and structural damage. MRI may prove to be a good alternative to radiography in definitions of knee replacement. One of the MRI parameters that predicts knee replacement is medial compartment cartilage volume/thickness, which correlates with radiographic joint space width, is sensitive to change, and predicts outcomes in a continuous manner. Other MRI parameters include BML and meniscal lesions. MRI appears to be a viable alternative to radiography for the evaluation of structural changes in knee osteoarthritis and prediction of joint replacement. [less ▲]

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See detailValue of biomarkers in osteoarthritis: current status and perspectives.
Lotz, M.; Martel-Pelletier, J.; Christiansen, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2013), 72

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint remodelling and disease progression. This article was prepared following a working meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis convened to discuss the value of biochemical markers of matrix metabolism in drug development in osteoarthritis. The best candidates are generally molecules or molecular fragments present in cartilage, bone or synovium and may be specific to one type of joint tissue or common to them all. Many currently investigated biomarkers are associated with collagen metabolism in cartilage or bone, or aggrecan metabolism in cartilage. Other biomarkers are related to non-collagenous proteins, inflammation and/or fibrosis. Biomarkers in osteoarthritis can be categorised using the burden of disease, investigative, prognostic, efficacy of intervention, diagnostic and safety classification. There are a number of promising candidates, notably urinary C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type II and serum cartilage oligomeric protein, although none is sufficiently discriminating to differentiate between individual patients and controls (diagnostic) or between patients with different disease severities (burden of disease), predict prognosis in individuals with or without osteoarthritis (prognostic) or perform so consistently that it could function as a surrogate outcome in clinical trials (efficacy of intervention). Future avenues for research include exploration of underlying mechanisms of disease and development of new biomarkers; technological development; the 'omics' (genomics, metabolomics, proteomics and lipidomics); design of aggregate scores combining a panel of biomarkers and/or imaging markers into single diagnostic algorithms; and investigation into the relationship between biomarkers and prognosis. [less ▲]

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