References of "2012"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailOptimization of recombinant root-secreted IgGs production in Arabidopsis thaliana by screening cell wall mutants
Boulanger, Benoit ULiege; Périlleux, Claire ULiege; Tocquin, Pierre ULiege

Poster (2012, April 18)

The production of complex heterologous proteins (e.g. monoclonal antibodies, mAbs) in plants has several advantages animal based systems such as low cost, scalability and limited risk of contamination by ... [more ▼]

The production of complex heterologous proteins (e.g. monoclonal antibodies, mAbs) in plants has several advantages animal based systems such as low cost, scalability and limited risk of contamination by human pathogens. mAbs are glycoproteins that require to be targeted to the plant secretory pathway in order to be properly folded and matured. They are ultimately delivered in the cell wall and are expected to be freely released in the extracellular space and the external medium, which would greatly simplify downstream processing. However, a significant part of plant produced and secreted mAbs remains bound to the cell wall, therefore hindering recovery. In this study, we evaluated the extra-cellular release of root-secreted proteins of wild-type plants and cell wall mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Recovered protein were either analyzed by SDS-PAGE for full proteome profiling or by gelatin zymography to reveal the activity of cell wall-bound proteases. The production, secretion and release of recombinant IgG will be eventually studied in transgenic hairy-roots generated from selected mutants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailOptimisation of new biodegradable microcarriers tailored for tissue engineering
Demina, T; Akopova, T; Tsoy, A et al

Poster (2012, April 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailNeuropeptides and endogenous opioids expression during silent chronic inflammation
Chavarria Bolanos, D; de Jesus Pozos Guillén, A; Grandfils, Christian ULiege et al

Poster (2012, April 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
See detail1-84 PTH and KDIGO Guidelines
CAVALIER, Etienne ULiege

Conference (2012, April 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 248 (5 ULiège)
See detailMolecular biomimetics applied to medical devices
Van de Weerdt, Cécile ULiege; Vreuls, Christelle ULiege; Genin, Alexis ULiege et al

Poster (2012, April 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (12 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNew Advances for In Situ Protein Identification by MALDI In-Source Decay FTMS Imaging
Calligaris, David ULiege; Zimmerman, Tyler ULiege; Debois, Delphine ULiege et al

Poster (2012, April 18)

MALDI imaging mass spectrometry has proven to be effective for the discovery and the monitoring of disease-related proteins. With this technique a molecular analysis could be performed directly from ... [more ▼]

MALDI imaging mass spectrometry has proven to be effective for the discovery and the monitoring of disease-related proteins. With this technique a molecular analysis could be performed directly from tissue sections in the region of the diseased area. The use of in-source decay (ISD), allowing fast and reliable sequences assignments of proteins termini, has proven to be a crucial tool for proteins identification in solution and tissue slices. However, it is necessary to develop additional tools that allow unambiguous assignment of proteins sequences in complex tissue slices. The development of bioinformatic tools and the use of ultra-high mass resolution and high mass accuracy of Fourier transform ion-cyclotron (FTICR) mass spectrometry are ideal for this purpose. In this study, we show that FTICR mass spectrometry combined with data filtering with a software that subtracts matrix peaks aid protein identification. All measurements were carried out on a SolariX FTMS (9.4 Tesla) equipped with a Dual Source with a smartbeamTMII laser (Bruker Daltonics). Mouse brain tissue slices of 14 µm thickness were rinsed to obtain optimal sensitivity and high-quality ions. Before matrix application, a spot of myelin was deposited near mouse brain. 1,5-Diaminionaphtalene was sprayed using an ImagePrep (Bruker Daltonics). Results were interpreted using BioToolsTM 3.2 in combination with MascotTM (Matrix Science) for ISD spectra and FlexImagingTM 3.0 for MALDI-ISD imaging experiments. Matrix peaks were subtracted using an in-house written Java code that sequentially scans all peak lists from acquired spectra against the DAN mass list. Then, another Java code allows to create 2D ion images at selected m/z ratios. The studies were carried out by MALDI-ISD imaging to create interest on FTICR mass spectrometer for proteins identification in the field of biomarkers characterization. It is demonstrated that protein ISD leads to the same pattern of fragmentation observed during MALDI-TOF analyzes. Fragmentation generates cn- and zn-series ions of myelin in presence of DAN. The internal calibration of all the data provides a mass accuracy neighboring 2.5 ppm over the m/z range of interest (300-2500 Da) and a mass resolution of 70000 at m/z 400 Da. It allows the assignment of ISD fragments of proteins in the low mass range (m/z between 300 and 900) that is unambiguously validated by the “ISD signal” recorded from the spots of pure protein solution (myelin) near tissue slice. Moreover, the use of our software “cleans” MS imaging data by reducing/eliminating MALDI matrix peaks that are isobaric to an analyte peak. Novel aspect This study evidences the main input of FTICR mass spectrometer for pathologies diagnosis based on biomarkers localization and identification by MALDI-ISD imaging. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailDegradation of recombinant IgG by root-secreted proteases of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum
Désiron, Carole ULiege; Lallemand, Jérôme ULiege; Périlleux, Claire ULiege et al

Poster (2012, April 18)

Plants are promising hosts for the production of complex recombinant pharmaceuticals, such as antibodies (mAbs), because they offer an inexpensive and safer alternative to traditional production systems ... [more ▼]

Plants are promising hosts for the production of complex recombinant pharmaceuticals, such as antibodies (mAbs), because they offer an inexpensive and safer alternative to traditional production systems. The plant-based production of mAbs, which are multimeric glycoproteins, require their targeting to the secretory pathaway where they are properly folded and matured. However, co-secretion of endogenous proteases, which can represent up to 10% of the extracellular proteins (secretome), is known to significantly alter the yield and quality of secreted mAbs. In this study, we analyzed the proteolytic activities in root-secretome of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. Root-secretomes were recovered by salt extraction and the protease activity was assayed in vitro or by zymography, in a range of pH. The relative contribution of protease classes was evaluated with specific inhibitors. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (12 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSynthesis and evaluation of boronic acids as inhibitors of Penicillin Binding Proteins of classes A, B and C
Zervosen, Astrid ULiege; Sauvage, Eric ULiege; Bouillez, André ULiege et al

Poster (2012, April 18)

The widespread use of beta-lactam antibiotics has lead to the worldwide appearance of drug-resistant strains. Bacteria have developed resistance to beta-lactams by three main mechanisms: the production of ... [more ▼]

The widespread use of beta-lactam antibiotics has lead to the worldwide appearance of drug-resistant strains. Bacteria have developed resistance to beta-lactams by three main mechanisms: the production of beta-lactamases that catalyze hydrolysis of beta-lactams, the production of low-affinity, drug resistant Penicillin Binding Proteins (PBPs) and the over expression of resistant PBPs. PBPs are interesting targets because they catalyse the last steps of the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, which is unique in bacteria and has no mammalian analogs, outside the cytoplasmic membrane. Various non-ß-lactam inhibitors of PBPs have been developed with the objective of attempting to stall the development of ß-lactam resistance. Boronic acids are potent beta-lactamase inhibitors and have been shown to display some specificity for soluble transpeptidases and PBPs, but their potential as inhibitors of the latter enzymes is yet to be widely explored. Recently, a (2, 6-dimethoxybenzamido)methylboronic acid was identified as being a potent inhibitor of Actinomadura sp. R39 transpeptidase (IC50: 1.3 µM). Here, we will discuss the synthesis of a number of acylaminomethylboronic acids, analogs of (2, 6-dimethoxybenzamido)methylboronic acid, and their potential as inhibitors of PBPs. Several boronic acids of this library were able to inhibit PBPs of classes A, B and C from penicillin sensitive strains. Thus (2-nitrobenzamido)methylboronic acid was identified as a good inhibitor of class A PBP (PBP1b from S. pneumoniae, IC50 = 26 µM), class B PBP (PBP2xR6 from S. pneumoniae, IC50 = 138 µM) and class C PBP (R39 from Actinomadura sp., IC50 = 0.6 µM). Crystal structures of complexes of R39 and PBP1b with boronic acid analogs of our library have already been solved and allowed an interpretation of results. We believe that this work opens new avenues towards the development of molecules that will inhibit PBPs, and eventually display bactericidal effect, on distinct bacterial species. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (21 ULiège)
See detailReading an Arthurian Prose Romance through its Textual Tradition.
Morato, Nicola ULiege

Scientific conference (2012, April 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHemocompatibility of nanocarriers designed to transport biopharmaceutical drugs
Sevrin, Chantal ULiege; Cerda, Bernardino; Lombart, François ULiege et al

Poster (2012, April 18)

The optimization of nanoparticles (NP) for drug delivery, in particular to target the BBB, imposes to verify their hemocompatibility both for toxicological and efficiency of targeting perspectives. Indeed ... [more ▼]

The optimization of nanoparticles (NP) for drug delivery, in particular to target the BBB, imposes to verify their hemocompatibility both for toxicological and efficiency of targeting perspectives. Indeed the large surface they are able to expose to the biological environment promotes their interaction with various biochemicals, in particular proteins which can after adsorption elicit the activation of biological cascades either responsible from NP clearance or/and harmful body reaction (inflammatory / coagulation). In the frame of the European Integrated Project : “Nanobiopharmaceutics”, we have the opportunity to compare the hemoreactivity of about 145 different NP samples differing in core and surface chemistry and classified according to their expected difference in hydrophobicity based on the nature of their core materials. According to this classification, PLGA nanoparticles, polyglycidol-polyethyethylene oxide nanoparticles, polyglycidol thyolated or polyacrylamide nanogels, and polyelectrolyte complexes either based on polyamidoamine or poly(N,N-dimethylamino-2-ethylmethacrylate) have been evaluated within a concentration ranging from 0.3 to 1000 =g/mL. These in vitro tests have been realized for screening purpose adopting normal human bloods and according to Iso 10993. As a summary of this extensive study, our results clearly highlight that most of the polymeric nanoparticles evaluated give rise to some alterations of the blood components. In particular the platelets, intrinsic pathway of coagulation and complement activation are the most reactive biological parameters in the presence of these nanostuctures. Although not strictly related to the surface chemistry our classification has also allowed us to derive some clear correlations between nanomaterial properties and their hemoreactivity. Within the class of polyelectrolyte electrolyte complexes, the modifications brought in the surface chemistry has drastically improved their hemoreactivity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (6 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNew alginate-chitosan hydrogel to repair cartilage
Henrotin, Yves ULiege

Conference (2012, April 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailL'enfermement des mineurs: pour ou contre?
Mormont, Christian ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailClostridium difficile in farm and slaughter animals in Belgium: detection and characterization
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULiege; Taminiau, Bernard ULiege; Van Broeck, Johan et al

Poster (2012, April 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (2 ULiège)
See detailPsychrotrophic and psychrophylic Clostridium responsible for meat spoilage
Rodrigues, A.; Taminiau, Bernard ULiege; Daube, Georges ULiege

Poster (2012, April 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULiège)
See detailEtudes des systèmes de défenses antitoxiques chez l’amphipode Gammarus roeseli : Effets du parasitisme et d’une exposition au cadmium.
Gismondi, Eric ULiege

Doctoral thesis (2012)

Pour faire face à des perturbations environnementales, les organismes ont développé des défenses antitoxiques couramment utilisés comme biomarqueurs dans l’évaluation de la qualité des milieux. Cependant ... [more ▼]

Pour faire face à des perturbations environnementales, les organismes ont développé des défenses antitoxiques couramment utilisés comme biomarqueurs dans l’évaluation de la qualité des milieux. Cependant, de nombreux facteurs confondants comme la température ou le genre, influencent la réponse de ces biomarqueurs. Il est ainsi nécessaire de connaitre les effets de ces facteurs afin d’imputer correctement la réponse biologique mesurée à la présence de polluants. Dans ce contexte, nous avons choisi d’étudier l’influence d’un parasite acanthocéphale, Polymorphus minutus, transmis horizontalement et de microsporidies à transmission verticale, sur les réponses physiologiques de leur hôte, Gammarus roeseli, un crustacé amphipode d’eau douce d’intérêt écotoxicologique. Pour cela, nous avons choisi d’étudier le glutathion, tripeptide jouant un rôle central dans les systèmes antitoxiques, sa synthèse (i.e. activité γ-glutamylcystéine ligase), les réserves énergétiques (i.e. lipides, glycogène, protéines) et un biomarqueur d’effets toxiques, le malondialdéhyde. L’influence du parasitisme a été appréhendé dans différents cas d’études: (i) chez G. roeseli infecté par P. minutus, (ii) chez G. roeseli infecté par des microsporidies (Dictyocoela roeselum essentiellement) et (iii) chez G. roeseli co-infecté par ces deux types de parasite. Chaque cas d’étude a été réalisé en absence de stress et lors d’une exposition au cadmium. Nous avons mis en évidence qu’en absence de contamination, la présence de P. minutus et une co-infection par P. minutus et D. roeselum affectent les biomarqueurs de G. roeseli. Après exposition au cadmium, la présence de parasites (i.e. infection simple ou co-infection) modifie la mobilisation des défenses antitoxiques et accentue les effets toxiques subits par l’hôte. Les résultats obtenus au cours de ce travail mettent en avant le caractère confondant du parasitisme en écotoxicologie et souligne l’importance de prendre en compte ce paramètre lors de l’évaluation de la qualité des milieux. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (5 ULiège)