References of "Majerus, Steve"
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See detailRole of phonological discrimination and inhibition in a short-term memory precision task in young and older adults
Gregoire, Coline ULiege; Bouffier, Marion ULiege; Fay, Séverine et al

Poster (2018, June 15)

Short-term memory (STM) precision is defined as the resolution at which items are stored in STM. It has to be distinguished from STM capacity which is characterized by a binary dimension: items are ... [more ▼]

Short-term memory (STM) precision is defined as the resolution at which items are stored in STM. It has to be distinguished from STM capacity which is characterized by a binary dimension: items are recalled or forgotten. STM precision refers to the notion that all items are available in memory, but their representation varies in terms of accuracy. Few studies have considered verbal STM precision and none of them has investigated STM precision from a lifespan perspective neither its links with inhibition capacity. The present study assessed young and elderly adults’ sensitivity to gradients of phonological similarity between target and probe items in a short-term recognition task. Moreover, executive tests (Stroop, Plus Minus, N-Back) and a discrimination task using the same items as the main STM precision task were administered. Using ANOVA, we observed strong evidence for a graded influence of phonological similarity on STM probe recognition. No age effect was observed, which suggest that phonological precision assessed in an auditory recognition task is stable across adulthood. We further investigate if executive functions and auditory discrimination explain performances when target and probe items are phonologically close. Using Multiple Linear Regression, results indicated that auditory discrimination and inhibition appeared to be the main predictors of incorrect recognition when probe items are phonologically highly similar to target items. This study suggests that phonological similarity is a useful variable for the investigation of the concept of precision in verbal STM. It further indicates that the precision of verbal STM coding could be preserved in aging, at least at the phonological level. This study rises interrogations on the role of inhibition in STM precision. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat did I just hear? Phonological similarity as an index of short-term memory precision for words and nonwords
Bouffier, Marion ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege

Conference (2018, May 18)

The concept of short-term memory (STM) precision has been defined as the resolution at which items are maintained and represented in STM (Joseph et al., 2015). It has to be distinguished from STM capacity ... [more ▼]

The concept of short-term memory (STM) precision has been defined as the resolution at which items are maintained and represented in STM (Joseph et al., 2015). It has to be distinguished from STM capacity, which refers to the number of items that are recalled in a STM task. So far, the concept of STM precision has received very little interest in the verbal STM domain. In two studies, we assessed the sensitivity to different degrees of phonological similarity between memory and probe items as a potential index of verbal STM precision at a lexical and sublexical level. In Study 1, 60 young adults had to maintain auditory lists of 6 words. In Study 2, 20 young adults had to maintain single four-syllable nonwords. After a delay, a probe stimulus was presented, and participants had to decide whether it matched one of stimuli in the list (Study 1), or whether it matched the stimulus to-be-maintained (Study 2). For each study, negative probes showed different degrees of phonological proximity with the target. Using Bayesian ANOVA, we observed robust evidence for an influence of phonological proximity on probe recognition performance: the more similar the negative probes to the target item, the higher the rate of false recognition and the slower the response times. Critically, we observed significant interindividual variability in sensitivity to phonological proximity. Overall, the variation of target-probe phonological similarity along a continuum may be a promising experimental procedure for studying the concept of STM precision in the verbal domain. [less ▲]

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See detailLe rôle de la mémoire dans les apprentissages : Focus sur la mémoire de travail
Majerus, Steve ULiege

Conference (2018, April 28)

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See detailCortico-Cerebellar Pathways for Understanding Language Coordination
Dumitru, Magdalena ULiege; Van Calster, Laurens ULiege; Bouffier, Marion ULiege et al

Poster (2018, March 25)

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See detailLes troubles de la mémoire de travail : Evaluation & Intervention
Majerus, Steve ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, January 26)

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See detailWorking memory for serial order and numerical cognition: What kind of association?
Majerus, Steve ULiege; Attout, Lucie ULiege

in Henik, Avishai; Fias, Wim (Eds.) Heterogeneity of Function in Numerical Cognition (2018)

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See detailTemporal grouping effects in musical short-term memory
Gorin, Simon ULiege; Mengal, Pierre; Majerus, Steve ULiege

in Memory (2018), 26(6), 831-843

Recent theoretical accounts of verbal and visuo-spatial short-term memory (STM) have proposed the existence of domain-general mechanisms for the maintenance of serial order information. These accounts are ... [more ▼]

Recent theoretical accounts of verbal and visuo-spatial short-term memory (STM) have proposed the existence of domain-general mechanisms for the maintenance of serial order information. These accounts are based on the observation of similar behavioural effects across several modalities, such as temporal grouping effects. Across two experiments, the present study aimed at extending these findings, by exploring a STM modality that has received little interest so far, STM for musical information. Given its inherent rhythmic, temporal and serial organisation, the musical domain is of interest for investigating serial order STM processes such as temporal grouping. In Experiment 1, the data did not allow to determine the presence or the absence of temporal grouping effects. In Experiment 2, we observed that temporal grouping of tone sequences during encoding improves short-term recognition for serially presented probe tones. Furthermore, the serial position curves included micro-primacy and micro-recency effects, which are the hallmark characteristic of temporal grouping. Our results suggest that the encoding of serial order information in musical STM may be supported by temporal positional coding mechanisms similar to those reported in the verbal domain. [less ▲]

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See detailLetter from the new Editor (Editorial Letter).
Majerus, Steve ULiege

in Psychologica Belgica (2018), 58

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See detailShort-and long-term memory determinants of novel word form learning
Ordonez Magro, Laura; Attout, Lucie ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege et al

in Cognitive Development (2018), 47

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See detailRééducation des fonctions cognitives supérieures : revue critique des outils existants
Majerus, Steve ULiege

in Seguin, Charlotte (Ed.) Neurosciences et rééducation cognitive chez l’enfant (2018)

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See detailLes troubles de la mémoire de travail chez l’enfant. Comment les évaluer ? Comment les rééduquer ?
Majerus, Steve ULiege

in Roy, Arnaud; Guillery-Girard, Bérengère; Aubin, Ghislaine (Eds.) et al Neuropsychologie de l’enfant: Approches cliniques, modélisations théoriques et méthodes (2018)

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See detailHow flexible is the use of egocentric versus allocentric frame of reference in the Williams syndrome population?
Heiz, Julie; Majerus, Steve ULiege; Barisnikov, Koviljka

in Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology (2018), 33

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See detailSerial order working memory and numerical ordinal processing share common processes and predict arithmetic abilities
Attout, Lucie ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege

in British Journal of Developmental Psychology (2018), 36

Recent studies have demonstrated that both ordinal number processing and serial order working memory (WM) abilities predict calculation achievement. This raises the question of shared ordinal processes ... [more ▼]

Recent studies have demonstrated that both ordinal number processing and serial order working memory (WM) abilities predict calculation achievement. This raises the question of shared ordinal processes operating in both numerical and WM domains. We explored this question by assessing the interrelations between numerical ordinal, serial order WM, and arithmetic abilities in 102 7- to 9-year-old children. We replicated previous studies showing that ordinal numerical judgement and serial order WM predict arithmetic abilities. Furthermore, we showed that ordinal numerical judgement abilities predict arithmetic abilities after controlling for serial order WM abilities while the relationship between serial order WM and arithmetic abilities was mediated by numerical ordinal judgement performance. We discuss these results in the light of recent theoretical frameworks considering that numerical ordinal codes support the coding of order information in verbal WM. [less ▲]

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See detailThe non-strategic nature of linguistic long-term memory effects in verbal short-term memory
Kowialiewski, Benjamin ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege

in Journal of Memory and Language (2018), 101

The contribution of lexical and semantic knowledge to verbal short-term memory (vSTM) span is explained by language-based models, assuming that vSTM is deeply grounded within the linguistic system with to ... [more ▼]

The contribution of lexical and semantic knowledge to verbal short-term memory (vSTM) span is explained by language-based models, assuming that vSTM is deeply grounded within the linguistic system with to-be-remembered items being activated in a non-strategic and automatic manner. However, direct evidence for a non-strategic account of lexical and semantic contributions to vSTM span is scarce. In this study, we assessed the influence of several types of long-term linguistic knowledge (lexicality, lexical frequency, semantic similarity and imageability) on vSTM using a fast encoding running span procedure preventing any strategic processes during encoding. We observed reliable effects of lexicality (words vs. nonwords, Experiment 1), lexical frequency (high vs. low frequency words, Experiment 2) and semantic similarity (related vs. unrelated lists, Experiment 3) on running span performance. However, word imageability (high vs. low imageability words, Experiment 4) did not consistently impact running span performance. Experiment 5 showed that the imageability effect only appears in standard immediate serial recall conditions which do not prevent list-strategic encoding. This study provides novel evidence for linguistic accounts of vSTM by demonstrating a robust impact of lexical and surface-level semantic knowledge on vSTM in non-strategic, fast-encoding conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailTesting the redintegration hypothesis by a single probe recognition paradigm
Kowialiewski, Benjamin ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege

in Memory (2018), 26

The lexicality effect in verbal short-term memory (STM), in which word lists are better recalled than nonword lists, is considered to reflect the influence of linguistic long-term memory (LTM) knowledge ... [more ▼]

The lexicality effect in verbal short-term memory (STM), in which word lists are better recalled than nonword lists, is considered to reflect the influence of linguistic long-term memory (LTM) knowledge on verbal STM performance. The locus of this effect remains however a matter of debate. The redintegrative account considers that degrading phonological traces of memoranda are reconstructed at recall by selecting lexical LTM representations that match the phonological traces. According to a strong version of this account, redintegrative processes should be strongly reduced in recognition paradigms, leading to reduced LTM effects. We tested this prediction by contrasting word and nonword memoranda in a fast encoding probe recognition paradigm. We observed a very strong lexicality effect, with better and faster recognition performance for words as compared to nonwords. These results do not support a strong version of the redintegrative account of LTM effects in STM which considers that these LTM effects would be the exclusive product of reconstruction mechanisms. If redintegration processes intervene in STM recognition tasks, they must be very fast, which at the same time provides support for models considering direct activation of lexico-semantic knowledge during verbal STM tasks. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical sub-categorization of minimally conscious state according to resting functional connectivity
Aubinet, Charlène ULiege; Larroque, Stephen Karl ULiege; Heine, Lizette et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2018), 39

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