References of "Pastoret, Paul-Pierre"
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See detailIntroduction: New developments in major vector-borne diseases
Zientara, Stéphan T.; Verwoerd, Daniel W.; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege

in Revue Scientifique et Technique. Office International des Epizooties (2015), 34(1), 17-27

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See detailData protection regulation and the promotion of health research : getting the balance right.
Fears, R.; Brand, H.; Frackowiak, R. et al

in QJM: Monthly Journal of the Association of Physicians (2014), 107(1), 3-5

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See detailEradicating rabies at source
Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege; Van Gucht, S.; Brochier, Bernard

in Revue Scientifique et Technique. Office International des Epizooties (2014), 33(2), 497-519

Along with zoonotic influenza and antimicrobial resistance, rabies has been identified as a key One Health issue by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), World Health Organization (WHO) and Food ... [more ▼]

Along with zoonotic influenza and antimicrobial resistance, rabies has been identified as a key One Health issue by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), World Health Organization (WHO) and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). It provides an excellent example of a disease that has an impact on public, animal and environmental health, and therefore benefits from a One Health approach to management. Regrettably, this zoonotic disease is still neglected despite the fact that, annually, it kills as many as 70,000 people worldwide (chiefly children in Asia and Africa), millions of dogs suffer and die, and the disease threatens some populations of endangered wildlife. This is particularly unfortunate, given that effective means of prevention exist. As Her Royal Highness Princess Haya of Jordan pointed out in a video to mark World Rabies Day on 28 September 2013, rabies is a serious world public health problem that is all too often underestimated and even neglected. Yet we know it can be eliminated. By combatting rabies at its source in animals and vaccinating 70% of dogs, we can eradicate it. [less ▲]

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See detailMultidisciplinary and Evidence-based Method for Prioritizing Diseases of Food-producing Animals and Zoonoses
Humblet, Marie-France ULiege; Vandeputte, Sébastien ULiege; Albert, Adelin ULiege et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2012), 18(4),

To prioritize 100 animal diseases and zoonoses in Europe, we used a multicriteria decision-making procedure based on opinions of experts and evidence-based data. Forty international experts performed ... [more ▼]

To prioritize 100 animal diseases and zoonoses in Europe, we used a multicriteria decision-making procedure based on opinions of experts and evidence-based data. Forty international experts performed intracategory and intercategory weighting of 57 prioritization criteria. Two methods (deterministic with mean of each weight and probabilistic with distribution functions of weights by using Monte Carlo simulation) were used to calculate a score for each disease. Consecutive ranking was established. Few differences were observed between each method. Compared with previous prioritization methods, our procedure is evidence based, includes a range of fields and criteria while considering uncertainty, and will be useful for analyzing diseases that affect public health [less ▲]

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See detailLa place de la vaccination en santé animale
Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege

in Bulletin de l'Académie Nationale de Médecine (2012), 196(3), 589-590

According to the IFAH, veterinary vaccines currently account for 26% of the global market in veterinary medicines, reflecting the importance of vaccines in animal health, as well as the number of wild and ... [more ▼]

According to the IFAH, veterinary vaccines currently account for 26% of the global market in veterinary medicines, reflecting the importance of vaccines in animal health, as well as the number of wild and domesticated target species, and the monospecific nature of most vaccines. Multispecies vaccines include tetanus and rabies. In 2010, the number of food-producing animals was estimated to be roughly 20 billion and is rising gradually. Fowl currently represent the main food species. Veterinary vaccination has allowed the eradication of rinderpest, as officially declared last year (2011), jointly by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO). Rinderpest was a real scourge, and was only the second viral disease to be totally eradicated (after human smallpox). One characteristic of veterinary vaccination is the DIVA approach, "differentiating infected from vaccinated animals". The DIVA strategy is especially interesting for regulated control of diseases like foot-and-mouth disease, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, pseudorabies, and classical swine fever. DIVA vaccination requires prior serological testing. Vaccination is also used for wild animals such as foxes (rabies) and wild boars (classical swine fever). "In ovo" vaccination of fowl on day 18 of the incubation period is used to prevent Marek's disease for instance, and double vaccination (vector and insert) to prevent both Marek's disease and Gumboro's disease in fowl. Animal vaccination can also help to protect human health, as illustrated by fowl vaccination against salmonellosis. [less ▲]

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See detailReducing hazards for animals from humans
Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege

in Italian Journal of Public Health (2012), 9(2), 25-28

If animals may be a source of hazards for humans, the reverse is equally true. The main sources of hazards from humans to animals, are the impact of human introduction of transboundary animal diseases ... [more ▼]

If animals may be a source of hazards for humans, the reverse is equally true. The main sources of hazards from humans to animals, are the impact of human introduction of transboundary animal diseases, climate change, globalisation, introduction of invasive species and reduction of biodiversity. There is also a trend toward reducing genetic diversity in domestic animals, such as cattle; there are presently around 700 different breeds of cattle many of which at the verge of extinction (less than 100 reproductive females). The impact of humans is also indirect through detrimental effects on the environment. It is therefore urgent to implement the new concept of "one health". [less ▲]

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See detailThe long journey: a brief review of the eradication of rinderpest.
Njeumi, Félix; Taylor, William; Diallo, Adama et al

in Revue Scientifique et Technique. Office International des Epizooties (2012), 31(3), 729-46

In 2011, the 79th General Session of the World Assembly of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the 37th Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAD) Conference adopted a ... [more ▼]

In 2011, the 79th General Session of the World Assembly of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the 37th Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAD) Conference adopted a resolution declaring the world free from rinderpest and recommending follow-up measures to preserve the benefits of this new and hard-won situation. Eradication is an achievable objective for any livestock disease, provided that the epidemiology is uncomplicated and the necessary tools, resources and policies are available. Eradication at a national level inevitably reflects national priorities, whereas global eradication requires a level of international initiative and leadership to integrate these tools into a global framework, aimed first at suppressing transmission across all infected areas and concluding with a demonstration thatthis has been achieved. With a simple transmission chain and the environmental fragility of the virus, rinderpest has always been open to control and even eradication within a zoosanitary approach. However, in the post-1945 drive for more productive agriculture, national and global vaccination programmes became increasingly relevant and important. As rinderpest frequently spread from one region to another through trade-related livestock movements, the key to global eradication was to ensure that such vaccination programmes were carried out in a synchronised manner across all regions where the disease was endemic - an objective to which the European Union, the United States Agency for International Development, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the African Union-Interafrican Bureau of Animal Resources, FA0 and OIE fully subscribed. This article provides a review of rinderpest eradication, from the seminal work carried out by Giovanni Lancisi in the early 18th Century to the global declaration in 2011. [less ▲]

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See detailAntimicrobial resistance in animal and public health: introduction and classification of antimicrobial agents.
Acar, Jacques; Moulin, Gérard; Page, Stephen et al

in Revue Scientifique et Technique. Office International des Epizooties (2012), 31(1), 15-21

Bacteria have a remarkable ability to adapt, evolve and survive by developing resistance to therapeutic compounds. This ability is also shared by other pathogenic agents such as viruses, fungi, and ... [more ▼]

Bacteria have a remarkable ability to adapt, evolve and survive by developing resistance to therapeutic compounds. This ability is also shared by other pathogenic agents such as viruses, fungi, and parasites. Even when focusing on bacterial resistance only, this phenomenon is quite complex to analyse due to the diversity of animal species, the diversity of rearing environment, the number of antimicrobial classes available and the diversity of pathogenic bacteria involved. This introductory paper includes developments on the place of antiviral compounds in veterinary medicine and a classification of antimicrobials used in food-producing animals. [less ▲]

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See detailApplication d’une méthodologie fondée sur la multidisciplinarité et la médecine factuelle pour ordonnancer et classer les maladies des animaux producteurs de denrées alimentaires et les zoonoses
Humblet, Marie-France ULiege; Vandeputte, Sébastien ULiege; Albert, Adelin ULiege et al

in Épidémiologie et Santé Animale (2012), 62

Le processus de hiérarchisation présenté dans ce travail repose sur une prise de décision multicritères qui inclut les opinions d’experts multidisciplinaires et des données de médecine factuelle. Cent ... [more ▼]

Le processus de hiérarchisation présenté dans ce travail repose sur une prise de décision multicritères qui inclut les opinions d’experts multidisciplinaires et des données de médecine factuelle. Cent maladies animales et zoonotiques ont été considérées dans l’exercice et cinq catégories regroupant 57 critères ont été prises en compte. Des experts internationaux ont réalisé une pondération intra-catégorie et inter-catégories des critères. L’information correspondant à chaque critère/maladie a été collectée sur base de la médecine factuelle. Un score global pondéré a été calculé pour chaque maladie sur base de deux approches, déterministe et probabiliste. Un classement consécutif des maladies a été établi. Un arbre de classification et de régression a permis de classer les maladies en quatre sous-groupes. Peu de différences ont été observées entre les méthodes déterministe et probabiliste. Cet outil générique et prédictif pourrait être appliqué dans différents contextes et à des maladies affectant d’autres espèces animales [less ▲]

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See detailThe importance of governance and reliable veterinary certification.
Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege; Chaisemartin, D.

in Revue Scientifique et Technique. Office International des Epizooties (2011), 30(1), 339-45347-52

Good veterinary certification is possible only if a country's veterinary governance complies with the quality standards of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). The standards in the OIE ... [more ▼]

Good veterinary certification is possible only if a country's veterinary governance complies with the quality standards of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). The standards in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code stipulate that the main prerequisite for good veterinary governance is for Veterinary Services to be independent, that is to say they are able to carry out their mandate while remaining autonomous and free from any commercial, financial, hierarchical or political pressures that could lead them to make technical decisions that were contrary to OIE standards. Veterinary Services should include, in particular, a veterinary administration with nationwide jurisdiction for implementing the animal health measures and veterinary certification procedures recommended by the OIE and for overseeing or auditing their implementation. They should also include veterinary authorities and persons authorised by the veterinary statutory body to perform tasks under the responsibility and supervision of a veterinarian (veterinary paraprofessionals). This veterinary governance must be sustainable over time in order to administer long-term animal health policies. Good governance relies on appropriate legislation that is in compliance with OIE guidelines and on the requisite human and financial resources for ensuring its enforcement. The evaluation of this governance, either by an importing country in the context of international trade, as authorised by OIE standards, or by the country itself (self-evaluation or an evaluation requested from the OIE [using the OIE Tool for the Evaluation of Performance of Veterinary Services]), helps to facilitate the proper operation of Veterinary Services and to ensure the reliability of any certification granted under the authority of the veterinary administration. [less ▲]

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See detailL'importance de la gouvernance ef de la fiabilité de la certification vétérinaire
Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege; Chaisemartin, D.

in Revue Scientifique et Technique. Office International des Epizooties (2011), 30(1), 339-352

Good veterinary certification is possible only if a country's veterinary governance complies with the quality standards of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). The standards in the OIE ... [more ▼]

Good veterinary certification is possible only if a country's veterinary governance complies with the quality standards of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). The standards in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code stipulate that the main prerequisite for good veterinary governance is for Veterinary Services to be independent, that is to say they are able to carry out their mandate while remaining autonomous and free from any commercial, financial, hierarchical or political pressures that could lead them to make technical decisions that were contrary to OIE standards. Veterinary Services should include, in particular, a veterinary administration with nationwide jurisdiction for implementing the animal health measures and veterinary certification procedures recommended by the OIE and for overseeing or auditing their implementation. They should also include veterinary authorities and persons authorised by the veterinary statutory body to perform tasks under the responsibility and supervision of a veterinarian (veterinary paraprofessionals). This veterinary governance must be sustainable over time in order to administer long-term animal health policies. Good governance relies on appropriate legislation that is in compliance with OIE guidelines and on the requisite human and financial resources for ensuring its enforcement. The evaluation of this governance, either by an importing country in the context of international trade, as authorised by OIE standards, or by the country itself (self-evaluation or an evaluation requested from the OIE [using the OIE Tool for the Evaluation of Performance of Veterinary Services]), helps to facilitate the proper operation of Veterinary Services and to ensure the reliability of any certification granted under the authority of the veterinary administration. [less ▲]

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See detailA survey of the transmission of infectious diseases/infections between wild and domestic ungulates in Europe
Martin, C.; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege; Brochier, B. et al

in Veterinary Research (2011)

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See detailIt's all about memory !
Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege

in Journal of Comparative Pathology (2010), 142(Suppl 1), 3

This short overview introduces the fundamental scientific concepts of immunological memory, vaccination, and the effects of ageing on these parameters, which were the focus of the second Merial European ... [more ▼]

This short overview introduces the fundamental scientific concepts of immunological memory, vaccination, and the effects of ageing on these parameters, which were the focus of the second Merial European Comparative Vaccinology Symposium (MECVS) held in Prague from 13th-15th May, 2009. Significant differences in the way that ageing impacts on different domestic animal species are reviewed. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman and animal vaccine contaminations
Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege

in Biologicals (2010), 38(3), 332-334

Vaccination is one of the most important public health accomplishments. However, since vaccine preparation involves the use of materials of biological origin, vaccines are subject to contamination by ... [more ▼]

Vaccination is one of the most important public health accomplishments. However, since vaccine preparation involves the use of materials of biological origin, vaccines are subject to contamination by micro-organisms. In fact, vaccine contamination has occurred; a historical example of vaccine contamination, for example, can be found in the early days of development of the smallpox vaccine. The introduction of new techniques of vaccine virus production on cell cultures has lead to safer vaccines, but has not completely removed the risk of virus contamination. There are several examples of vaccine contamination, for example, contamination of human vaccines against poliomyelitis by SV40 virus from the use of monkey primary renal cells. Several veterinary vaccines have been contaminated by pestiviruses from foetal calf serum. These incidents have lead industry to change certain practices and regulatory authorities to develop more stringent and detailed requirements. But the increasing number of target species for vaccines, the diversity of the origin of biological materials and the extremely high number of known and unknown viruses and their constant evolution represent a challenge to vaccine producers and regulatory authorities. [less ▲]

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See detailViral safety and extraneous agents testing for veterinary vaccines
Dodet, Betty; Hesselink, Wim; Jungback, Carmen et al

in Biologicals (2010), 38(3), 326-331

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See detailIntroduction: Invasive species Part 1: General aspects and biodiversity Part 2: Concrete examples
Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege; Moutou, F.

in Revue Scientifique et Technique. Office International des Epizooties (2010), 29(1), 15-26

The problem of invasive species is of interest to researchers in a variety of different fields, including biology, epidemiology, agriculture, public health and even human sciences. It is an issue that ... [more ▼]

The problem of invasive species is of interest to researchers in a variety of different fields, including biology, epidemiology, agriculture, public health and even human sciences. It is an issue that affects all regions of the world to a greater or lesser extent. It can also have detrimental effects on animal health and biodiversity. For example, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) reported that 625 (51%) of known endangered species are threatened because of invasive (alien) species. [less ▲]

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See detailInvasive species. Part 1: General aspects and biodiversity. Part 2: Concrete examples.
Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege; Moutou, François

in Revue Scientifique et Technique. Office International des Epizooties (2010), 29(2), 419-20421-2423-4

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See detailWhy own an exotic pet ?
Moutou, François; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege

in Revue Scientifique et Technique. Office International des Epizooties (2010), 29(2), 359-65351-8

Even though people have owned a wide variety of companion animals since times of old, the modern craze for increasingly exotic and little-known species raises a number of questions, including some of an ... [more ▼]

Even though people have owned a wide variety of companion animals since times of old, the modern craze for increasingly exotic and little-known species raises a number of questions, including some of an ethical nature. While trade in exotic animals is certainly profitable for these who practise it, it poses great risks of varying types: ecological risks, threats to biodiversity conservation and health risks. Several introduced animal populations have gone on to establish a line in their new host country. We are just starting to measure the adverse impact this has had, in some cases on a very large scale. The veterinary profession doubtless has a major role to play in endeavouring to reform this trade in living creatures that unfortunately results in many losses. [less ▲]

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See detailInvasive reptiles and amphibians
Moutou, François; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege

in Revue Scientifique et Technique. Office International des Epizooties (2010), 29(2), 227-233235-40

Although they are frequently lumped together, reptiles and amphibians belong to two very different zoological groups. Nevertheless, one fact is clear: while numerous reptile and amphibian species on Earth ... [more ▼]

Although they are frequently lumped together, reptiles and amphibians belong to two very different zoological groups. Nevertheless, one fact is clear: while numerous reptile and amphibian species on Earth are in decline, others have taken advantage of trade or human movements to become established in new lands, adopting different, and sometimes unusual, strategies. The authors have taken a few examples from these two zoological groups that illustrate the majority of cases. A brief analysis of the causes and effects of their introductions into new areas reveals connections with economic interests, trade in companion animals, medical research and public health. [less ▲]

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See detailInvasive mammals.
Moutou, François; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULiege

in Revue Scientifique et Technique. Office International des Epizooties (2010), 29(2), 209-16201-8

Every region of the world is concerned by potential mammal invasions, as humans are already present on all the world's land masses. All these invasions are a result of species introductions by humans for ... [more ▼]

Every region of the world is concerned by potential mammal invasions, as humans are already present on all the world's land masses. All these invasions are a result of species introductions by humans for one reason or another. The authors briefly review the known movements and observed consequences of mammal-related invasions. They take examples from all five continents, as well as from a few island systems. The ancient introduction of game species, and later of domestic species, has been followed more recently by movements of commercial species. We are now seeing the emergence of what are known as entertainment species. In a number of cases, such introductions have led to the establishment of new epidemiological cycles that previously might never have been thought possible. According to current indicators, this phenomenon is not on the wane. [less ▲]

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