References of "Zickgraf, Caroline"
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See detailSlow onset events related to climate change and human mobility: Synthesizing current knowledge
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

in Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability (in press)

The breadth of emerging case studies and empirical evidence linking slow onset events and human mobility (migration and displacement) is difficult to succinctly summarize, owing to the wide range of slow ... [more ▼]

The breadth of emerging case studies and empirical evidence linking slow onset events and human mobility (migration and displacement) is difficult to succinctly summarize, owing to the wide range of slow onset hazards, their impacts, their varied interactions with other drivers of population movement, and the specificity of local contexts. Nevertheless, the growing literature demonstrates that the effects of slow onset processes interact with social, political, economic, environmental, and demographic factors to drive both human migration and displacement. One of the major impacts of slow onset events evident in the literature is the disruption of local livelihoods, particularly for those people dependent on natural resources, e.g. farmers, fishers, and pastoralists. Commonly, this underpins empirical case studies related to economic, more ‘voluntary’ migration patterns, yet these events may also contribute to displacement by decreasing ecosystem services and overwhelming populations’ capacity to withstand both slow- and rapid-onset events. The combination of these impacts can lead local communities to reach climatic and social tipping points, at which the socio-ecological capacity to cope in situ is exceeded, leading to displacement. This synthesis article, therefore, distinguishes between displacement and more voluntary forms of migration in slow onset contexts related to climate change, while acknowledging that a clear distinction between migration and displacement is often blurred in the context of slow-onset events such as sea-level rise, desertification and land and forest degradation. It recognizes that slow-onset events may in many situations interact or exacerbate rapid-onset events in multi-risk scenarios, increasing the risk of loss and damage. The article assesses the state of knowledge on human mobility related to slow onset events by distilling academic and ‘grey’ literature across geographical regions, with particular attention given to developing country contexts. It will draw from various secondary and bibliographic resources including the CLIMIG database. This contribution identifies commonalities as well as gaps and tensions in the field at different spatial scales, in order to provide scientific information that can support and inform national planning and policymaking processes in assessing and addressing the mobility impacts and risks associated with slow onset events. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Romanian white-collar immigrants in Brussels: a transnational community under construction
Nicola, Sanda-Elena; Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege; Schmitz, Serge ULiege

in Belgeo (2021), 2021(1),

Focusing on a population of white-collar immigrants who chose to move from Romania to Brussels-Capital Region between 2014 and 2019, this article signals the formation of a third wave of Romanian ... [more ▼]

Focusing on a population of white-collar immigrants who chose to move from Romania to Brussels-Capital Region between 2014 and 2019, this article signals the formation of a third wave of Romanian migration. The participants in the study are Romanians residing in Brussels, corresponding to the features of the European Man (Homo Europaeus) and they belong to the "middle class" leaving Romania at an accelerated pace motivated by the desire to achieve a transnational lifestyle and an improvement of subjective well-being. We draw our findings from both quantitative data on mobility in the EU and qualitative research that reveals what are the elements that push, attract, and retain RWCIs to Brussels. It is also an opportunity to reflect upon the notion of sense of place experienced by a population that, despite having only recently moved to Brussels, already shows a high degree of attachment. [less ▲]

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See detailMigration and Environmental Change in Morocco: In search for Linkages Between Migration Aspirations and (Perceived) Environmental Changes
Van Praag, Lore; Ou-Salah, Loubna; Hut, Elodie ULiege et al

Book published by Springer (2021)

This open access book studies the migration aspirations and trajectories of people living in two regions in Morocco that are highly affected by environmental change or emigration, namely Tangier and ... [more ▼]

This open access book studies the migration aspirations and trajectories of people living in two regions in Morocco that are highly affected by environmental change or emigration, namely Tangier and Tinghir, as well as the migration trajectories of immigrants coming from these regions currently living in Belgium. This book departs from the development of a new theoretical framework on the relationship between environmental changes and migration that can be applied to the Moroccan case. Qualitative research conducted in both countries demonstrate how the interplay between migration and environmental factors is not as straightforward as it seems, due to its wider social, political, economic, demographic and environmental context. Findings show how existing cultures of migration, remittances, views on nature and discourses on climate change create distinct abilities, capacities and aspirations to migrate due to environmental changes. The results illustrate how migration and environmental factors evolve gradually and mutually influence each other. In doing so, this book offers new insights in the ways migration can be seen as an adaptation strategy to deal with environmental change in Morocco. [less ▲]

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See detailThe State of Environmental Migration 2020: A Review of 2019
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege; Castillo Betancourt, Tatiana ULiege; Hut, Elodie ULiege

Book published by Presses universitaires de Liège (2021)

Edited by The Hugo Observatory of the University of Liège, this volume is the tenth in the annual series and the fifth of its kind published with the Presses Universitaires de Liège. The State of ... [more ▼]

Edited by The Hugo Observatory of the University of Liège, this volume is the tenth in the annual series and the fifth of its kind published with the Presses Universitaires de Liège. The State of Environmental Migration aims to provide its readership with the most updated assessments on recent events and evolving dynamics of environmental migration throughout the world. Each year, the editors select the best graduate student work from the course “Environment and Migration” taught by Caroline Zickgraf at the Paris School of International Affairs (PSIA) of Sciences Po. This year’s authors focus primarily on sudden-onset displacement events, including the Australian megafires, the dam failure in Brumadinho (Brazil), the floods in Budrio (Italy), the Kerala floods (India), and cyclones Idai and Fani in Mozambique and India. The relationship between drought and conflict-related internal displacement in Somalia’s Bay Region, as well as the importance of populations’ perceptions of environmental risk on (im)mobility outcomes during acqua alta in Venice are analysed and discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailHandbook on Climate Change and Human Mobility
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege; Gemenne, François ULiege

Book published by Edward Elgar (2021)

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See detailTransformative climate action in cities
Gemenne, François ULiege; Depoux, Annelise ULiege; Pettinotti, Laetitia et al

in Forced Migration Review (2020), 63

A critical, but understudied, issue of concern is how climate change will affect migrant populations living in cities, and how local governance and actions to combat the effects of climate change will ... [more ▼]

A critical, but understudied, issue of concern is how climate change will affect migrant populations living in cities, and how local governance and actions to combat the effects of climate change will address displaced people’s vulnerability and support their integration. This article is based on desk research, interviews with experts in a variety ofdomains, and representatives of mayoral and municipal offices in North American, European, African, and Asian cities. [less ▲]

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See detailClimate Change and Migration: Myths and Realities
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Article for general public (2020)

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See detailThe State of Environmental Migration 2019: A Review of 2018
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege; Castillo Betancourt, Tatiana ULiege; Hut, Elodie ULiege

Book published by Presses universitaires de Liège (2020)

Edited by The Hugo Observatory of the University of Liège, this volume is the ninth in the annual series and the fourth of its kind published with the Presses Universitaires de Liège. The State of ... [more ▼]

Edited by The Hugo Observatory of the University of Liège, this volume is the ninth in the annual series and the fourth of its kind published with the Presses Universitaires de Liège. The State of Environmental Migration aims to provide its readership with the most updated assessments on recent events and evolving dynamics of environmental migration throughout the world. Each year, the editors select the best graduate student work from the course “Environment and Migration” taught by Caroline Zickgraf at the Paris School of International Affairs (PSIA) of Sciences Po. In this edition, the effects on migration and displacement of some of the most dramatic disasters of 2018 are studied, including the Sulawesi earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia, Hurricane Florence and Camp Fire (which was the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California’s history) in the United States, and the Volcán de Fuego eruption in Guatemala. The relationship between progressive environmental changes and migration in the Nepalese Hindu Kush Himalayas, and the effects of armed conflicts on the prevention and management of disaster-induced displacement in Afghanistan are also analysed and discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailCOVID-19, Climate Change and Migration: Constructing Crises, Reinforcing Borders
Hut, Elodie ULiege; Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege; Gemenne, François ULiege et al

Article for general public (2020)

Migration, climate change and public health are three key policy challenges of this early 21st century. Far from being isolated, these challenges are linked with one another, both directly and indirectly ... [more ▼]

Migration, climate change and public health are three key policy challenges of this early 21st century. Far from being isolated, these challenges are linked with one another, both directly and indirectly. The connections between them have never been as apparent as in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic: borders and immobility played a central role in the response, and COVID-19 has been tied to climate change, for instance, with regards to the temporary positive impact of lockdown measures on CO2 emissions. In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, many have suggested that similar measures should be replicated in the fight against climate change, while others have deemed this as misguided and pointed to the potentially counterproductive effects of such claims. Lastly, physical distancing requirements are expected to further complicate responses to climate-related displacement (as recently confirmed in East India and Bangladesh, where Cyclone Amphan struck). In addition to such relationships, a uniting feature of these three phenomena is the way they each have been labelled, perceived, and reacted to from a crisis perspective. Crisis framing is not just about how each topic is covered in the media or discussed in the public eye: crisis narratives translate into, and justify, short-term, ad-hoc responses instead of preemptive, integrated approaches that may be more appropriate given the global and systemic nature of these phenomena. The opposite is equally true: emergency measures (e.g. evacuations, lockdowns, state-of-emergency declarations) can also play a role in creating and exacerbating crises. Moreover, measures in each crisis, whether health, climate or migration-related, have resulted in calls for, or the actual, restriction of migration and mobility, whether to contain the spread of a virus, to lower carbon emissions, or to restrict incoming migration flows deemed massive and/or sudden. [less ▲]

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See detailScoping analysis on the nexus between climate change and migration in cities
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege; Gemenne, François ULiege; Depoux, Annelise ULiege

Report (2020)

Report prepared for C40 – Cities Climate Leadership Group and The Mayors’ Migration Council (MMC)

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (7 ULiège)
See detailMigration and Security
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Speech/Talk (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (1 ULiège)
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See detailClimate migration myths
Boas, Ingrid; Farbotko, Carol; Adams, Helen et al

in Nature Climate Change (2019), 9

Misleading claims about mass migration induced by climate change continue to surface in both academia and policy. This requires a new research agenda on ‘climate mobilities’ that moves beyond simplistic ... [more ▼]

Misleading claims about mass migration induced by climate change continue to surface in both academia and policy. This requires a new research agenda on ‘climate mobilities’ that moves beyond simplistic assumptions and more accurately advances knowledge of the nexus between human mobility and climate change. [less ▲]

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See detailClimate Change and Human Mobility
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Speech/Talk (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (2 ULiège)
See detailClimate Change and Migration in Africa
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (2 ULiège)
See detailHuman Rights and Displacement :The Adverse Effects of Climate Change
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (1 ULiège)
See detailMigration into and within Europe and Security Issues
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege; Hut, Elodie ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 ULiège)
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See detail(Im)mobilities & climate Change: Locating environmental immobility in theory and in practice
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference (2019, June 06)

Thus far, most research on the human impacts of climate change has focused on the people displaced, who have come to incarnate the human faces of global warming (Gemenne 2011). However, the people who ... [more ▼]

Thus far, most research on the human impacts of climate change has focused on the people displaced, who have come to incarnate the human faces of global warming (Gemenne 2011). However, the people who face the same adverse conditions, but who stay in communities of origin have been relegated to the academic and political backburner. Only recently have scholars noted that ‘in the decades ahead millions of people will be unable to move away from locations in which they are extremely vulnerable to environmental change’, becoming trapped populations (Foresight 2011). While those ‘trapped’ or who choose to stay in areas affected by climate change represent a substantial policy issue, there is little empirical work specifically targeting such populations. The scant attention that is afforded to immobility emphasises financial constraints as drivers of immobility (Zickgraf 2018). In other words, it is frequently assumed that people facing climate change yet who do not leave simply cannot afford to move. As an essential part of the mobility spectrum, the complexity of immobility in crisis, including its social and political dimensions, warrants thorough investigation. In response to these research gaps, from 2015 to 2018, the IMMOBILE project asked why people become (or remain) immobile in the face of climatic and environmental change and then articulated the relationship between migration, on one hand, and immobility, on the other. This contribution locates environmental immobility within mobilities studies, its conceptual complexities, and, finally, illustrates these issues with the findings of the IMMOBILE project. The findings are based on 160 semi-structured interviews conducted in three developing countries experiencing environmental degradation (including but not limited to the impacts of climate change): Senegal, Comoros, and Viet Nam. The presentation delves into the nature of (im)mobility patterns and outcomes as they interact with social, political, economic, environmental and demographic forces. In political spaces that are dominated by a desire to limit human mobility and reinforce sedentary biases, we underline the effects of these discourses, policies, and programmes on people’s aspirations and abilities to migrate out of harm’s way. [less ▲]

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See detailThe State of Environmental Migration
Zickgraf, Caroline ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

Invited Speaker to International Resource Panel (IRP) Internal Scoping Workshop on Environmental Displacement and Migration

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See detailChapter 4: Cross-Cutting Issues
McMullen, Catherine; McLain, Shana; Abiodun, Babatunde Joseph et al

in Gupta, Joyeeta; Boileau, Pierre; Ekins, Paul (Eds.) UN ENvironment Global Environment Outlook: GEO-6 (2019)

Stage78444.1IntroductionAs understanding of the interdependence between a healthy planet and healthy people becomes more developed, complex issues that thread through systems and societies gain new ... [more ▼]

Stage78444.1IntroductionAs understanding of the interdependence between a healthy planet and healthy people becomes more developed, complex issues that thread through systems and societies gain new importance. Beyond the traditional Global Environment Outlook (GEO) themes addressing air, biodiversity, oceans, land and fresh water, this GEO-6 assessment addresses cross-cutting issues worthy of further examination. Using a systems approach, these cross-cutting issues offer entry points allowing another dimension for analysing GEO-6 themes as well as understanding the network of interconnections throughout earth and human systems. These cross-cutting issues are grouped according to shared characteristics: health, environmental disasters, gender, education and urbanization are grouped as ‘people and livelihoods’; climate change, polar and mountain regions, chemicals and waste and wastewater are grouped as ‘changing environments’; and resource use, energy and food systems are considered as ‘resources and materials’. While each issue provides useful entry points into GEO-6 themes, it is important to discuss the state of the environment and policy context for each one. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (1 ULiège)