References of "Wannez, Sarah"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPCI & Auditory ERPs for the diagnosis of disorders of consciousness: a EEG-based methods comparison study
Blandiaux, Séverine ULiege; Raimondo, Federico ULiege; Wolff, Audrey ULiege et al

in European Journal of Neurology (2018, June), 25(S2),

INTRODUCTION Diagnosing the level of consciousness in patients suffering from severe brain lesions is still a major challenge. EEG-based systems can help discriminate conscious from unconscious patients ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION Diagnosing the level of consciousness in patients suffering from severe brain lesions is still a major challenge. EEG-based systems can help discriminate conscious from unconscious patients. This study aims to confront the results from two of the most reliable methods: the Perturbational Complexity Index (PCI) which is based on Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS-EEG), and a recent machine learning approach using EEG-extracted markers from a standardized oddball auditory stimulation paradigm (EEG-ERP). METHODS Patients presenting either an unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS), a minimally conscious state (MCS) or an emergence of MCS (EMCS) underwent both TMS-EEG and EEG-ERP. We computed PCI value by compressing the spatiotemporal pattern of cortical responses to the perturbation of the cortex with TMS. For EEG-ERP, we extracted 60 markers corresponding to quantification of power spectrum and complexity in individual EEG sensors and information sharing between them. Using machine-learning, we predicted the individual probability of being (minimally) conscious. RESULTS PCI and EEG markers, when considered categorically (i.e. UWS vs MCS), were consistent for all UWS and EMCS patients, whereas the results for MCS patients showed less consistency. Nevertheless, we found a significant correlation between PCI values and the probability of being conscious with the multivariate classifier. CONCLUSION PCI correlated positively with the combination of EEG markers in severely brain-injured patients. These findings imply that EEG signatures of consciousness can be reliably extracted from different contexts and combined into coherent predictive models, encouraging future efforts in large-scale data-driven clinical neuroscience. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (11 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRandomized controlled trial of home-based 4-week tDCS in chronic minimally conscious state
Martens, Géraldine ULiege; Lejeune, Nicolas ULiege; O'Brien, Anthony et al

in Brain Stimulation (2018)

Background Patients with chronic disorders of consciousness face a significant lack of treatment options. Objective We aimed at investigating the feasibility and the behavioral effects of home-based ... [more ▼]

Background Patients with chronic disorders of consciousness face a significant lack of treatment options. Objective We aimed at investigating the feasibility and the behavioral effects of home-based transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), applied by relatives or caregivers, in chronic patients in minimally conscious state (MCS). Methods Each participant received, in a randomized order, 20 sessions of active and 20 sessions of sham tDCS applied over the prefrontal cortex for 4 weeks; separated by 8 weeks of washout. Level of consciousness was assessed using the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised before the first stimulation (baseline), after the end of the 20 tDCS sessions (direct effects) and 8 weeks after the end of each stimulation period (long-term effects). Reported adverse events and data relative to the adherence (i.e., amount of sessions effectively received) were collected as well. Results Twenty-seven patients completed the study and 22 patients received at least 80% of the stimulation sessions. All patients tolerated tDCS well, no severe adverse events were noticed after real stimulation and the overall adherence (i.e., total duration of stimulation) was good. A moderate effect size (0.47 and 0.53, for modified intention to treat and per protocol analysis, respectively) was observed at the end of the 4 weeks of tDCS in favor of the active treatment. Conclusions We demonstrated that home-based tDCS can be used adequately outside a research facility or hospital by patients’ relatives or caregivers. In addition, 4 weeks of tDCS moderately improved the recovery of signs of consciousness in chronic MCS patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 148 (14 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGlobal structural integrity and effective connectivity in patients with disorders of consciousness
BODART, Olivier ULiege; Amico, Enrico; Gomez, Francisco et al

in Brain Stimulation (2018)

Background Previous studies have separately reported impaired functional, structural, and effective connectivity in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). The perturbational complexity index (PCI ... [more ▼]

Background Previous studies have separately reported impaired functional, structural, and effective connectivity in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). The perturbational complexity index (PCI) is a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) derived marker of effective connectivity. The global fractional anisotropy (FA) is a marker of structural integrity. Little is known about how these parameters are related to each other. Objective We aimed at testing the relationship between structural integrity and effective connectivity. Methods We assessed 23 patients with severe brain injury more than 4 weeks post-onset, leading to DOC or locked-in syndrome, and 14 healthy subjects. We calculated PCI using repeated single pulse TMS coupled with high-density electroencephalography, and used it as a surrogate of effective connectivity. Structural integrity was measured using the global FA, derived from diffusion weighted imaging. We used linear regression modelling to test our hypothesis, and computed the correlation between PCI and FA in different groups. Results Global FA could predict 74% of PCI variance in the whole sample and 56% in the patients' group. No other predictors (age, gender, time since onset, behavioural score) improved the models. FA and PCI were correlated in the whole population (r = 0.86, p < 0.0001), the patients, and the healthy subjects subgroups. Conclusion We here demonstrated that effective connectivity correlates with structural integrity in brain-injured patients. Increased structural damage level decreases effective connectivity, which could prevent the emergence of consciousness. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (15 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrevalence of coma-recovery scale-revised signs of consciousness in patients in minimally conscious state
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege; Azzolini, Deborah et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2018), 28(8), 1350-1359

Different behavioural signs of consciousness can distinguish patients with an unresponsive wakefulness syndrome from patients in minimally conscious state (MCS). The Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) is ... [more ▼]

Different behavioural signs of consciousness can distinguish patients with an unresponsive wakefulness syndrome from patients in minimally conscious state (MCS). The Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) is the most sensitive scale to differentiate the different altered states of consciousness and eleven items detect the MCS. The aim of this study is to document the prevalence of these items. We analysed behavioural assessments of 282 patients diagnosed in MCS based on the CRS-R. Results showed that some items are particularly frequent among patients in MCS, namely fixation, visual pursuit, and reproducible movement to command, which were observed in more than 50% of patients. These responses were also the most probably observed items when the patients only showed one sign of consciousness. On the other hand, some items were rarely or never observed alone, e.g., object localisation (reaching), object manipulation, intelligible verbalisation, and object recognition. The results also showed that limiting the CRS-R assessment to the five most frequently observed items (i.e., fixation, visual pursuit, reproducible movement to command, automatic motor response and localisation to noxious stimulation) detected 99% of the patients in MCS. If clinicians have only limited time to assess patients with disorders of consciousness, we suggest to evaluate at least these five items of the CRS-R. © 2017, © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 110 (43 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDiagnosis, prognosis and treatment in disorders of consciousness
Cassol, Helena ULiege; Aubinet, Charlène ULiege; Thibaut, Aurore ULiege et al

in NPG. Neurologie - Psychiatrie - Gériatrie (2018), 18

Advances in medicine and intensive care have led to an increase in the number of patients surviving a severe brain injury. Although some patients recover quickly, others remain in a state of altered ... [more ▼]

Advances in medicine and intensive care have led to an increase in the number of patients surviving a severe brain injury. Although some patients recover quickly, others remain in a state of altered consciousness. These patients can progress from a coma to a vegetative state or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) and later to a minimally conscious state (MCS). In this review, we first describe the different behavioral and neuroimaging methods used in the diagnosis of patients in an altered state of consciousness. We then describe the factors that can influence the prognosis and recovery of these patients, as well as the treatment and therapeutic management that can be proposed in order to improve their state of consciousness. Finally, we conclude this review by highlighting ethical considerations and end-of-life issues. © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 124 (6 ULiège)
See detailMultimodal imaging analysis in Charles Bonnet Syndrome: a case report
Martial, Charlotte ULiege; Di Perri, Carol ULiege; Larroque, Stephen Karl ULiege et al

Poster (2017, June)

Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a rare condition characterized by visual impairment associated with complex visual hallucinations in psychologically normal elderly people. Previous studies have suggested ... [more ▼]

Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a rare condition characterized by visual impairment associated with complex visual hallucinations in psychologically normal elderly people. Previous studies have suggested that visual hallucinations may be caused by brain damage in the visual system. However, in the case of CBS, specific brain regions in the occipital cortex have not been clearly determined and functional neuroimaging remains relatively unexplored. To our knowledge, functional connectivity by means of resting-state magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has never been investigated in patients with CBS. We here aimed to investigate structural imaging, brain metabolism and functional connectivity in a patient with CBS. Resting-state functional and structural MRI were acquired in an 85-year-old patient with CBS and 12 age- and gender-matched normally sighted controls. Cognitive functioning was measured by behavioral assessment. A seed-based resting state fMRI was performed to investigate the default mode network (DMN), the executive control network and the visual networks connectivity. A voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis was employed to investigate the grey matter volume. Cortical and subcortical grey matter thickness were further investigated. Finally, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was also acquired to observe regional glucose uptake by comparing standard uptake values (SUVs). Increased functional connectivity was found between the DMN and the temporo-occipital fusiform cortex, as well as between the secondary visual cortex and the left frontal cortex, in the CBS patient compared to controls. The patient also demonstrated increased functional connectivity between the primary visual cortex and the left supramarginal gyrus and between the associative visual cortex and the superior temporal gyrus/angular gyrus, as compared to controls. Decreased grey matter volume was observed in the lateral occipital cortex/angular gyrus in our patient as compared to controls. Diminished grey matter thickness values were observed in the lateral geniculate nucleus compared to healthy controls. FDG-PET results confirmed previous work and showed bilateral hypometabolism in the occipital cortex (mean SUV reduction of 5.36%, p<0.001). Our results suggest that structural alterations in visual system in CBS are associated with compensatory/adaptive changes in functional connectivity that involve regions known to support hallucinations of faces in CBS patients. We suggest that this functional connectivity reorganization following visual structural damage may contribute to visual hallucinations. These findings might shed light on the pathophysiology underlining this rare condition. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (12 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs oral feeding compatible with an unresponsive wakefulness syndrome?
MELOTTE, Evelyne ULiege; MAUDOUX, Audrey ULiege; DELHALLE, Sabrina ULiege et al

Conference (2017, May)

INTRODUCTION AND AIMS Vegetative state/Unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) is defined by the presence of eye-opening and the absence of awareness and voluntary movement (Laureys et al., 2010). VS ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION AND AIMS Vegetative state/Unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) is defined by the presence of eye-opening and the absence of awareness and voluntary movement (Laureys et al., 2010). VS/UWS patients classically receive hydration and nutrition through an enteral feeding tube. We present the cases of two patients that were diagnosed as VS/UWS but were able to resume oral feeding. It is however unclear if the presence of oral feeding is compatible with the diagnosis of VS/UWS or if this observation should lead to a modification of the diagnosis. METHODS AND RESULTS We retrospectively reviewed the clinical information of 65 VS/UWS patients (aged 45±12; range 16-85 years) evaluated at the CHU hospital of Liege searching for mention of oral feeding. VS/UWS diagnosis was made after repeated behavioral assessments using the standardized Coma Recovery Scale–Revised (CRS-R, (Teasdale & Jennet, 1974)) in association with complementary evaluations using neuroimaging techniques. Of the 65 VS/UWS patients, two could resume oral feeding (3%). One could achieve full oral feeding (mixed texture and liquid) and the other had oral feeding (liquid and semi-liquid) in addition to gastrostomy feeding. Neuroimaging evaluations showed in both patients a massive decrease in the spontaneous brain activity and its functional connectivity (using functional magnetic resonance imaging), bilateral cerebral cortex hypometabolism (fronto- parietal associative areas, posterior parietal areas, cingulate cortices, precuneus) and preserved metabolism in the brainstem and cerebellum (using positron emission tomography). CONCLUSIONS Oral feeding is rare in VS/UWS patients (3% in our cohort). Based on neuroimaging results, this behaviour does not seem to be incompatible with the diagnosis of VS/UWS but the neuromecanistic root, which allows this behavior, still needs to be elucidate. This study also emphasizes the importance of systematic swallowing evaluation in patients with altered state of consciousness regardless of their level of consciousness. Moreover, tactile oro-facial stimulation, manual therapy, taste stimulation and therapeutic feeding can be another “gateway” to interact with these patients and improve their quality of life. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (20 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail2 Years outcome of patients in unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state and minimally conscious state
Cassol, Helena ULiege; LEDOUX, Didier ULiege; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie et al

Poster (2017, March)

INTRODUCTION: Following severe acute brain damage, patients typically evolve from coma to an unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state (UWS/VS; wakefulness without awareness) and later to a ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Following severe acute brain damage, patients typically evolve from coma to an unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state (UWS/VS; wakefulness without awareness) and later to a minimally conscious state (MCS; fluctuating but consistent nonreflex behaviors). MCS is subcategorized in MCS+ (i.e., command following) and MCS- (i.e., visual pursuit, localization of noxious stimulation or contingent behaviours). Reliable and consistent interactive communication and/or functional use of objects indicate the next boundary – emergence from MCS (EMCS). To date, there is still no reliable predictive model of recovery from the UWS/VS and the MCS. A better understanding of patients' outcome would help in decisions regarding patients’ care and rehabilitation, as well as end-of-life decisions. METHODS: We collected demographic information, acute care history and longitudinal follow-up of patients in UWS/VS and MCS admitted in 15 expert centers in Belgium (via the Belgian Federal Public Service Health). Patients were evaluated at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months post injury with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised and the diagnosis was based on internationally accepted criteria of UWS/VS, MCS or EMCS. Results were considered significant at p<0.001. RESULTS: 24 months follow-up was available for 476 patients including 261 diagnosed in UWS/VS (88 traumatic, 173 non-traumatic) and 215 diagnosed in MCS (80 traumatic, 135 non-traumatic) one month after the injury. Patients who were in MCS one month after the insult were more likely to recover functional communication or object use after 24 months than patients in UWS/VS. Moreover, functional recovery occurred more often in MCS+ (79%) as compared to MCS- (29%), and mortality rate was more important in MCS- patients (68%) as compared to MCS+ (21%). Comparisons within UWS/VS and MCS groups based on etiology showed that traumatic patients had a better outcome at 24 months than non-traumatic patients. Among non-traumatic patients, no difference was found between anoxic patients and patients with other etiologies regarding functional recovery. CONCLUSION: Our study highlights that the outcome is significantly better for patients who are in MCS one month post-injury as compared to patients who remain in UWS/VS at that time. Concerning MCS patients, the outcome is significantly better for patients who are MCS+ one month post-injury as compared to patients who are MCS- at that time. This study also confirms that patients with traumatic etiology have better prognosis than patients with non-traumatic causes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 246 (13 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailEvaluation comportementale chez les patients en état de conscience altérée: que nous dit la recherche?
Wannez, Sarah ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (4 ULiège)
See detailQuelle conscience dans le coma et les états de conscience altérée?
Wannez, Sarah ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailControlled clinical trial of repeated prefrontal tDCS in patients with chronic minimally conscious state.
Thibaut, Aurore ULiege; Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Donneau, Anne-Françoise ULiege et al

in Brain Injury (2017), 31(4), 466-474

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of repeated transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) sessions on the level of consciousness in chronic patients in minimally conscious state (MCS). METHODS: In this ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of repeated transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) sessions on the level of consciousness in chronic patients in minimally conscious state (MCS). METHODS: In this randomized double-blind sham-controlled crossover study, we enrolled 16 patients in chronic MCS. For 5 consecutive days, each patient received active or sham tDCS over the left prefrontal cortex (2 mA during 20 min). Consciousness was assessed with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) before the first stimulation (baseline), after each stimulation (day 1-day 5) and 1 week after the end of each session (day 12). RESULTS: A treatment effect (p = 0.013; effect size = 0.43) was observed at the end of the active tDCS session (day 5) as well as 1 week after the end of the active tDCS session (day 12; p = 0.002; effect size = 0.57). A longitudinal increase of the CRS-R total scores was identified for the active tDCS session (p < 0.001), while no change was found for the sham session (p = 0.64). Nine patients were identified as responders (56%). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that repeated (5 days) left prefrontal tDCS improves the recovery of consciousness in some chronic patients in MCS, up to 1 week after the end of the stimulations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe repetition of behavioral assessments in diagnosis of disorders of consciousness.
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Heine, Lizette ULiege; Thonnard, Marie et al

in Annals of Neurology (2017), 81(6), 883-889

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether repeated examinations using the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) have an impact on diagnostic accuracy of patients with disorders of consciousness and to provide ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether repeated examinations using the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) have an impact on diagnostic accuracy of patients with disorders of consciousness and to provide guidelines regarding the number of assessments required for obtaining a reliable diagnosis. METHODS: One hundred twenty-three adult patients with chronic disorders of consciousness were referred to our tertiary center. They were assessed at least six times with the CRS-R within a 10-day period. Clinical diagnoses based on one, two, three, four, and five Coma Recovery Scale-Revised assessments were compared with a reference diagnosis (ie, the highest behavioral diagnosis obtained after six evaluations) using nonparametric statistics. Results were considered significant at p < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons. RESULTS: The number of assessments had a significant effect on the clinical diagnosis. Up to the fourth examination, the diagnosis was still statistically different from the reference diagnosis based on six CRS-R assessments. Compared to this reference diagnosis, the first evaluation led to 36% of misdiagnoses. INTERPRETATION: The number of CRS-R assessments has an impact on the clinical diagnosis of patients with chronic disorders of consciousness. Up to the fourth examinations, behavioral fluctuations may still impact the diagnostic accuracy. We here suggest performing at least five assessments in each patient with disorders of consciousness within a short time interval (eg, 2 weeks) to reduce misdiagnosis. Ann Neurol 2017;81:883-889 Ann Neurol 2017;81:883-889. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (13 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBrain networks predict metabolism, diagnosis and prognosis at the bedside in disorders of consciousness.
Chennu, Srivas; Annen, Jitka ULiege; Wannez, Sarah ULiege et al

in Brain: a Journal of Neurology (2017), 140(8), 2120-2132

Recent advances in functional neuroimaging have demonstrated novel potential for informing diagnosis and prognosis in the unresponsive wakeful syndrome and minimally conscious states. However, these ... [more ▼]

Recent advances in functional neuroimaging have demonstrated novel potential for informing diagnosis and prognosis in the unresponsive wakeful syndrome and minimally conscious states. However, these technologies come with considerable expense and difficulty, limiting the possibility of wider clinical application in patients. Here, we show that high density electroencephalography, collected from 104 patients measured at rest, can provide valuable information about brain connectivity that correlates with behaviour and functional neuroimaging. Using graph theory, we visualize and quantify spectral connectivity estimated from electroencephalography as a dense brain network. Our findings demonstrate that key quantitative metrics of these networks correlate with the continuum of behavioural recovery in patients, ranging from those diagnosed as unresponsive, through those who have emerged from minimally conscious, to the fully conscious locked-in syndrome. In particular, a network metric indexing the presence of densely interconnected central hubs of connectivity discriminated behavioural consciousness with accuracy comparable to that achieved by expert assessment with positron emission tomography. We also show that this metric correlates strongly with brain metabolism. Further, with classification analysis, we predict the behavioural diagnosis, brain metabolism and 1-year clinical outcome of individual patients. Finally, we demonstrate that assessments of brain networks show robust connectivity in patients diagnosed as unresponsive by clinical consensus, but later rediagnosed as minimally conscious with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised. Classification analysis of their brain network identified each of these misdiagnosed patients as minimally conscious, corroborating their behavioural diagnoses. If deployed at the bedside in the clinical context, such network measurements could complement systematic behavioural assessment and help reduce the high misdiagnosis rate reported in these patients. These metrics could also identify patients in whom further assessment is warranted using neuroimaging or conventional clinical evaluation. Finally, by providing objective characterization of states of consciousness, repeated assessments of network metrics could help track individual patients longitudinally, and also assess their neural responses to therapeutic and pharmacological interventions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMirror efficiency in the assessment of visual pursuit in patients in minimally conscious state.
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege; Laureys, Steven ULiege et al

in Brain Injury (2017)

OBJECTIVE: Visual pursuit should be tested with a mirror in patients with disorders of consciousness. This stimulus was indeed more efficient than a person or an object, and the auto-referential aspect ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Visual pursuit should be tested with a mirror in patients with disorders of consciousness. This stimulus was indeed more efficient than a person or an object, and the auto-referential aspect was supposed to be the key feature. The present study tested the hypothesis that the mirror was more efficient because of its self-aspect. METHODS: The mirror was compared (1) to the patient's picture and to the picture of a famous face, in 22 patients in minimally conscious state and (2) to the patient's picture and a fake mirror, which had dynamical and bright aspects of the mirror, without reflecting the face, in 26 other patients in minimally conscious state. RESULTS: The mirror was more efficient than the patient's picture, which was not statistically different from the famous face. The second part of the study confirmed the statistical difference between the mirror and the picture. However, the fake mirror was neither statistically different from the mirror nor from the picture. CONCLUSIONS: Although our results suggest that the hypothesis proposed by previous studies was partly wrong, they confirm that the mirror is the best stimulus to use when assessing visual pursuit. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (24 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailObjective assessment of visual pursuit in patients with disorders of consciousness: an exploratory study.
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Hoyoux, Thomas; Langohr, Thomas et al

in Journal of Neurology (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (17 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFunction–structure connectivity in patients with severe brain injury as measured by MRI-DWI and FDG-PET
Annen, Jitka ULiege; Heine, Lizette ULiege; Ziegler, Erik et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2016), 37(11), 3707-3720

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (36 ULiège)
See detailDisorders of Consciousness
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Martens, Géraldine ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailQuelle conscience dans le coma?
Wannez, Sarah ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (2 ULiège)