References of "Von Hoffmann, Viktoria"
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See detailGeschmackssinn
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

in Enzyklopädie der Neuzeit online (in press)

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See detailLe goût : l’esthétique et la cuisine. Invention d’un discours
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

Article for general public (in press)

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See detailArt of Taste and Aesthetics of Cooking
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

in Anker, Susan; Flach, Sabine (Eds.) Molecular cuisine: The Politics of Taste (in press)

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See detailThe Sense of Touch in Italian Renaissance anatomy
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

Scientific conference (2019, March 04)

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See detailHistorico-Futuristic Perspective of the City of Liège
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

Speech/Talk (2018)

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See detailLe Sensible et le Culinaire. Les Prémisses d’une artification au XVIIIe siècle
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

in Desbuissons, Frédérique; Csergo, Julia (Eds.) Le Cuisinier et l’art. Art du cuisinier et cuisine d'artiste (XVIIIe-XXIe siècles) (2018)

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See detailWrap up (conclusions)
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

Conference (2017, November 18)

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See detailHistoire du goût. La naissance d'une passion
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

in 303 arts, recherches, créations (2017), 148

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See detailIngenious Hands? Touch and Technique in Renaissance Practices of Anatomy
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

Conference (2017, May 11)

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See detailSensations of the Shallow Body: Surgery, Dissections, and Technologies of Touch in Renaissance Italy
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

Conference (2017, March 09)

My contribution is part of a new work in progress exploring the sense of touch in Italian Renaissance anatomy. Through regular experiences of surgery and dissections, anatomists/surgeons refined their ... [more ▼]

My contribution is part of a new work in progress exploring the sense of touch in Italian Renaissance anatomy. Through regular experiences of surgery and dissections, anatomists/surgeons refined their sense of touch and developed a particularly acute ability to feel and act upon bodily parts and substances. By looking at the dissecting body—the hand, fingers, and skin of anatomists/surgeons—this paper will examine the body dissected—especially its bones, muscles, and surfaces—highlighting the multiple layers of the sense of touch in the Renaissance. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Sense of Taste in Eighteenth-Century France. Flavours of Silence and Words of Perception
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

in Achttiende Eeuw: Documentatieblad van de Werkgroep Achttiende Eeuw (2017), 48(1-2), 13-27

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See detailReview of W. Wall, Recipes for Thought. Knowledge and Taste in the Early Modern English Kitchen
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

in Reformation (2016), 21(2), 146-147

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See detailThe Anatomy of Touch. Anatomical Knowledge and Technologies of Touch in the Renaissance
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

Scientific conference (2016, September 09)

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See detailLearning to Dissect. The Technologies of Touch in the Renaissance
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

Conference (2016, August)

The aim of this paper is to examine the part played by the sense of touch in anatomical practices and discourses in Renaissance Italy. As dissections became widespread in the sixteenth century, a sensory ... [more ▼]

The aim of this paper is to examine the part played by the sense of touch in anatomical practices and discourses in Renaissance Italy. As dissections became widespread in the sixteenth century, a sensory approach to the inside of the dead body (anatomia sensibilis), through the anatomist’s eye and touch, was thought to be the surest way of uncovering truths about the living body. Carlino, Kusukawa, Mandressi, Park, and Sawday have convincingly emphasized the importance of sight and visual experience in the production and communication of anatomical knowledge, through the emergence of an “autoptic vision” (Sawday) and more broadly of a new “visual argument” (Kusukawa) for the early modern scientific study of Nature. Yet the practice of anatomy engages haptic as much as visual experience: when dissecting, the anatomist cuts through the skin and touches the inside of the dead body, with his scalpel and his hands, in order to enhance his knowledge of the living body. Manual skills thus became a source of insight as they helped to unveil the real state of the body’s inside. Many medical students were therefore eager not only to attend but also to perform dissections, in order to get a better grasp of the functioning of the human body. Using records from anatomical demonstrations and notes from medical students, this paper seeks to explore the technologies of touch that were displayed when medical students were learning to dissect. What was the part played by the sense of touch in educational practices, as well as in the production and communication of anatomical knowledge? How did the students cope with the disgust which would arise from the tactile contact with blood and other bodily fluids? How was the dissecting hand of the anatomist presented by students in their descriptions of anatomical lessons? What was the importance of the practitioner’s touch in the process of reading the body’s inner reality? Was the sense of touch used as a rhetorical strategy to express authority and claim expertise? In a word: did Vesalian anatomy and the new anatomy theatre involve a new relationship with touch (as well as observation, as has been argued)? Did a new ‘tactile argument’ also arise in this context? [less ▲]

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See detailThe Anatomy of Touch: Nature, Knowledge, and Technologies of Touch in the Renaissance
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

Scientific conference (2016, May 23)

In the last few decades, promising new approaches to the study of the senses and to the body have shed new light on how people in the past experienced their lives, as much as on the ways in which ... [more ▼]

In the last few decades, promising new approaches to the study of the senses and to the body have shed new light on how people in the past experienced their lives, as much as on the ways in which knowledge about self and the world was being shaped, negotiated and transformed. Although all the senses could contribute to these discussions, scholars have predominantly focused on sight and visual cultures, leaving other potentially fruitful avenues unexplored. Touch, especially, has received little attention in historical research, where it has been reduced to a history of sexuality, leaving its other dimensions unexamined. Yet this sense, considered the defining sense of human nature, raises important questions regarding the part played by the lower senses in knowledge production, as well as in society and culture at large. Sources concerning Renaissance anatomy provide a significant lens through which to examine the part played by touch in the early modern study of Nature, as evidenced by the practice of dissections, which engaged the body, the skin and the hand of the anatomists, in their attempt to unveil the truths hidden inside the body. Using theoretical writings (anatomical textbooks) as well as sources more closely linked to daily practices (such as university notes of medical students), this paper seeks to explore the technologies of touch that were displayed in 16th-century anatomical practices and discourses, with the aim of highlighting the epistemological value of the sense of touch in early modern inquiries about Nature and the human body. [less ▲]

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See detailLa viande, questions de vies et de morts ?
Clinquart, Antoine ULiege; Vandenheede, Marc ULiege; Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

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See detailLa distinction par le goût
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

in Papilles (2016), 46

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See detailThe Taste of the Eye and the Sight of the Tongue. The Relations Between Sight and Taste in Early Modern Europe
Von Hoffmann, Viktoria ULiege

in Senses and Society (2016), 11 (2016)(2), 83-113

This article examines the articulation between the senses of taste and sight through the representations of their organs, the tongue and the eye, in early modern Europe. The relationship between taste and ... [more ▼]

This article examines the articulation between the senses of taste and sight through the representations of their organs, the tongue and the eye, in early modern Europe. The relationship between taste and sight first brings to mind gastronomical aesthetics, and the part played by the eye in the relish of beautifully presented dishes. The first part of this article is therefore devoted to exploring the taste of the eye (or the foretaste of sight) and highlights the harmony of taste and sight in early modern cuisine. However, the forms of reciprocity between taste and sight cannot be reduced to the sole figure of culinary aesthetics, which tends to blur the other multiple modalities that this sensorial association could reveal. The second part, the sight of the tongue (or the invisibility of taste), thus examines more complex layers of the relationship between the sense of sight and the taste organ, through a study of the representations of the tongue and of the gaping mouth in early modern visual culture. Drawing on early modern textual and iconographic resources and exploring: cookbooks; physiognomic works; conduct books; and also engravings and paintings related to the culinary arts, the seven deadly sins, and representations of madness and the fool in early modern visual culture, this essay argues that examining the representations of the sense organs is a suggestive way to explore the relationship between the senses. [less ▲]

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